Skip to content
 

   

 

AARP Coronavirus Tele-Town Halls Jan. 28

Expert answers on COVID-19 prevention and care

Listen to AARP's Coronavirus Q&A Sessions

Listen to replays of the events below.

Tele-Town Hall 012821 – 1 PM Vaccines Distribution & Protecting Yourself -

Bill Walsh: Hello, I am AARP Vice President Bill Walsh, and I want to welcome you to this important discussion about the coronavirus. Before we begin, if you'd like to hear this telephone town hall in Spanish, press *0 on your telephone keypad now. AARP, a nonprofit, nonpartisan member organization has been working to promote the health and well-being of older Americans for more than 60 years. In the face of the global coronavirus pandemic, AARP is providing information and resources to help older adults and those caring for them. As many of you have seen as we close out the first month of the new year, the pandemic is continuing to show signs of worsening. Yet we continue to see major challenges in distributing the vaccine. Consumers are frustrated by confusing systems for signing up for a shot, and local governments are struggling to keep up with demand. And, unfortunately, where the need is greatest in nursing homes and long-term care facilities, millions are still unvaccinated. We'll address these issues and more with our expert panel and take your questions.

If you've participated in one of our tele-town halls in the past, you know this is similar to a radio talk show, and you have the opportunity to ask questions live. For those of you joining us on the phone, if you'd like to ask a question, press *3 on your telephone keypad to be connected with an AARP staff member who will note your name and question and place you in a queue to ask that question live. If you're joining on Facebook or YouTube, you can post your question in the comments section.

Joining us today are Steven C. Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Anschutz Medical Campus Multidisciplinary Center on Aging. Also Lori Smetanka, executive director of the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, which is the leading national nonprofit advocacy organization representing consumers receiving long-term care services. And finally, Mr. Clarence Anthony, chief executive officer of the National League of Cities representing America's cities. We'll also be joined by my AARP colleague Jean Setzfand, who will help facilitate your calls today.

This event is being recorded, and you can access that recording at aarp.org/coronavirus 24 hours after we wrap up. 

Now I'd like to bring in our guests, each of whom have joined us for tele-town hall events before. So I'm delighted to welcome them back. First, we have Steven C. Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Anschutz Medical Campus Multidisciplinary Center on Aging. Dr. Johnson serves on the National Institutes of Health panel on the management of COVID-19. Thanks for being here again, Dr. Johnson.

Steven Johnson: Thank you, Bill. Glad to be here.

Bill Walsh: All right, delighted to have you. We also have Lori Smetanka. She is the executive director of the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care. That organization is the leading national nonprofit advocacy organization representing consumers who receive long-term care and services in nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and home and community-based settings. She is responsible for the strategic direction of the organization. Welcome back, Lori.

Lori Smetanka: Thanks so much for having me again. Glad to be here.

Bill Walsh: All right. Thank you. And Clarence Anthony is the chief executive officer of the National League of Cities, the voice of America's cities, towns and villages, representing more than 200 million people. Clarence began his career in public service as the mayor of South Bay, Florida. Thanks for joining us, Clarence.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, thank you so much for having me. It's a joy to be back here again today.

Bill Walsh: All right. Thanks for being with us. Let's go ahead and get started with our discussion. Dr. Johnson, let's start with you. We've heard the Biden administration's goal of a hundred million vaccine doses in the first hundred days. Is that doable in your opinion? And what's being done to make that goal a reality?

Steven Johnson: Well, thanks for that question. First of all, I think it is doable. And in fact, there have been a couple of days where the number of vaccines distributed have been close to a million, so I think it is achievable. You know, I think it starts with, of course, the supply of vaccine itself, and so the degree to which the two authorized vaccines can be produced and distributed is important. Certainly, if some of the other vaccines that are under study become available under an emergency use authorization, and the supply is increased, that would be great. There are some issues, I think, at the state level. I think we've recognized that there's a difference between the number of vaccines that have been received versus the number that had been administered. And part of that has been related to state practices of holding back doses so that they're assured that the second dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are available. But I think we need to work on logistics in terms of distribution. And then I think we need to work on methods to increase administration at the state and local level, which may involve large vaccine events; it may involve, military assistance, things like that. I think the goal is achievable, but it would be ideal to have a higher goal because one million a day for a population of 331 million, it still would take a long time to roll out the vaccine.

Bill Walsh: Sure, well thank you for that. Let me switch gears a little bit. We're hearing news about a more contagious COVID-19 variant. What do we know about that? And how will the current preventative steps such as mask-wearing and the social distancing work against new variants? And do we know anything about the vaccines’ effectiveness against those variants?

Steven Johnson: Well, I'd start with a few basic points, and that is that viruses do mutate, they change. You know, a good example of that is the influenza virus where we have to reengineer a vaccine each year based on the changes in the strain, but coronaviruses also mutate, and we've recognized new strains since the beginning of the pandemic. But there are some new strains that are concerning. You likely have heard of strains from the United Kingdom, from South Africa and Brazil. What we seem to know most about right now is that they're more transmissible. And of course, viruses that are more transmissible mean more people will get infected, and then, you know, the consequences of that. We know less about how the virus affects individuals once they're infected. There is some preliminary data from the United Kingdom that these variants could be more dangerous than the original circulating coronavirus.

Now in terms of whether the vaccines will be effective, I think the conventional wisdom right now is that they will remain effective. The companies and researchers have been testing the antibody responses to these vaccines. And, in most cases, the vaccines seem to work, although you may have heard about somewhere where maybe they're somewhat less effective. But the vaccines induce a very broad response from your body's immune system. So our hope is that these vaccines will work. I think it's quite possible that down the line a year from now or two years from now, we may have to engineer kind of new vaccines that better reflect the common strain that's circulating.

Bill Walsh: Hmm. That's a sobering comment to think that this will be with us for another two years.

Steven Johnson: Bill, let me just make one more point though, is this really underscores the importance of these other measures that we've come to rely on in terms of masking and social distancing and so on. It's really doubly important while we learn about these variants that people don't let down their guard in terms of these other preventive measures.

Bill Walsh: And I assume that applies also to people who have gotten the vaccine.

Steven Johnson: Well, we're learning more about individuals who have gotten the vaccine. Our current advice is for those individuals to continue to use the same practices that everyone else is to avoid the possibility of exposure and reinfection, which is possible, and again, when we give a vaccine that's 95 percent effective, that still means that 1 out of 20 individuals may not have responded to the vaccine. And right now we don't know who that five percent are.

Bill Walsh: Hmm. OK. Thanks for that, Dr. Johnson. Lori Smetanka, I'd like to bring you in here. Why have we seen delays in getting vaccines to residents of nursing homes and assisted-living facilities? These folks are arguably the most vulnerable — 40 percent of the COVID deaths have occurred in those settings. How does it differ from programs available to the public?

Lori Smetanka: Well, there have been a number of factors that we think are affecting getting the vaccines to residents of these facilities, including some of the processes being used to distribute the vaccines in each state. The varying numbers of facilities and residents that need to be vaccinated and even things like the need to obtain advanced consent for issuing the vaccine for some of the residents who aren't able to consent themselves. There needs to be outreach to legal representatives or others who were able to give some of that consent. So those are some of the factors that have been affecting this. Many states have entered into partnerships with pharmacies, as you know, to vaccinate residents, and they're relying on clinics or different processes that are being set up by those pharmacies, so they're having to arrange those and have people from the pharmacies go into the facilities to organize those clinics, and then arrange for the vaccines for the residents and the staff. And each facility is scheduling multiple clinics. So it's taking some time there. But we do know that the nursing homes continue to be top priority for vaccine distribution and that it be offered to every resident and staff person who's willing to accept it. And we're hopeful that with some of the new pieces put into place by President Biden over the last week, like for example, increasing production through Defense Production Act, connecting with different entities to assist in distribution, we're hopeful that the necessary doses will be headed to all long-term care facilities as soon as possible.

Bill Walsh: Right. OK. Well, let me ask you a very practical question. You know, throughout this process families have struggled to get regular and accurate information from nursing facilities. What questions should family members ask about the vaccine program at their loved one's nursing home, and what recourse do they have if they don't get adequate answers?

Lori Smetanka: Yeah, it's important for residents and families to stay as involved and stay as informed as they can. And that the facilities be providing timely and accurate information to them about what's happening, not just related to vaccines, but also with respect to COVID. So, with the vaccines, we are encouraging people to ask a lot of questions of their facility and some things they can ask, for example, are when will the vaccinations be given, what's the process that's been put into place and what's the schedule? And if, for some reason, the resident can't make that time, you know, people go out for doctor's visits, for example, or some people have been hospitalized, will there be alternative days and times that are available for the resident to get vaccinated? How will the nursing home get consent for those people who aren't able to give it themselves? And can that be arranged in advance as far as possible before the clinics that are being set up. Ask about the vaccination rates in the facility, so far, and what happens if a resident chooses not to get vaccinated? Will it be offered at a future time if they change their mind and they can get vaccinated at some point in the future? And also be asking what kind of processes and protections will be in place to protect all residents, recognizing that some residents and staff are declining right now to get the vaccine. So we need to make sure that people are going to be protected. And if they don't get satisfactory answers to the questions, we encourage people to certainly talk to the administration in the facility, but they should also contact their long-term care ombudsman program for help. And they can find an ombudsman who's an advocate for residents in long-term care facilities. They can find one in their area by going to our website at theconsumervoice.org, all one word, and they can get their local ombudsman contact information there.

Bill Walsh: Very good. And that's a really important point for our listeners. There are ombudsmen across the country, and they are there to help advocate on your behalf with long-term care facilities. That web address that Lori just provided was theconsumervoice.org. There's also a hotline for the eldercare locator. That number is (800) 677-1116. Again, if you're having challenges with the facilities where your loved ones are, call that number, ask to get engaged with the ombudsman, and they should help you out. OK, well, thank you for that, Lori. Clarence, let's turn to you. You know, we've heard a lot of consumer complaints about not being able to get a vaccine or even how to sign up for one in some cases. What are the challenges that local governments are facing in distributing the vaccine? And what's being done to address them? And what local resources do governments need to help out?

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, well, thank you again for having me. I think one of the biggest challenges for local governments and most municipal officials is that we're not directly responsible for the distribution in most cities in America because we don't have our own health department. But usually, we work collaboratively with our county officials to get the information out to our residents. And the one thing that we are encouraging our members to do, and they are doing it, they're advocating on their behalf. I mean, Lori talked about ways in which they can get access, and they also, if they don't get the information that they need, where can they go? Well most often the most trusted level of government is the local government and cities, towns and villages throughout America. And what we're deeply concerned that, you know, that responsibility that we have as trusted leaders are at risk because we have not been able to get the money directly into the hands of city leaders, town leaders, to be able to help them get access to the vaccine. My mayors and council members are really concerned at the most at risk who suffer disproportionately from COVID infections, the sickness and the deaths, especially in the Black, indigenous and people of color populations. And many of those have not had access to the vaccine because of a number of reasons. But I can tell you that the health care system and that access and this distrust on a day-to-day basis is causing our residents not to get as connected and get the shot that we know is essential to having a healthy long-term life. There's no question that there's a huge disconnect between supply and demand and a lack of understanding. So what we're trying to do is making sure that we sit down with those health care workers, and that we sit down with the health departments and the state leaders, and we share the concerns of our communities, our residents so that that they can understand those variables, and then they can overcome those. Clearly, I'll tell you that technology gap in access is a big challenge to the first round of aged population in America. So we're on the front line, we're taking it serious, we're showing up and that's the important thing. But we've got to partner with the public health systems in our counties and our states.

Bill Walsh: Well thanks for that, Clarence. And as most of our listeners may know, each state is handling its vaccine distribution program a little bit differently. One resource AARP has created to help people understand what's happening where they live is on our website. We've created state-by-state guides. You can check those out at aarp.org/coronavirus. You just pick your state, and you'll get a pretty easy to read summary of the distribution plans at your state and helpful phone numbers, and also questions to ask your health care professionals. So thanks for that, all of our guests. And as a reminder to all of our listeners ... oh, go ahead.

Clarence Anthony: I think that's very important to have that kind of information. And I will tell you, there are cities like Dallas who have registration fields, that people are coming in, that they don't have technology and they have language barriers. So city leaders are working with AARP, which AARP is a great partner to have to get the information out.

Bill Walsh: OK, well, thank you for that. As a reminder to our listeners, to ask your question, please press *3. And we're going to get to those questions very soon. But before we do, I wanted to bring in AARP's Executive Vice President and Chief Advocacy and Engagement Officer Nancy LeaMond. Welcome Nancy.

Nancy LeaMond: Thanks Bill. Thanks for having me.

Bill Walsh: Nancy, what is AARP doing to fight for the 50-plus as the vaccines are being rolled out and make sure they know how to get the vaccines in their states?

Nancy LeaMond: Well, for months, and it seems like years actually, but for months, AARP has called for action to improve the health and economic security of older Americans and all Americans during the pandemic. As the death toll, hospitalization rates, case numbers and the economic impact of the pandemic continue to rise, it's a critical time for all of us. And while we're seeing tremendous demand for COVID vaccines, we know that many of you are incredibly frustrated that you haven't been able to get the vaccine, or simply get clear information about when you will be able to do so. And when looking for information, [it can’t] just be online. We need 1-800 call centers in every state where you can talk to someone and get your questions answered. This is the most important task facing the new administration. There is no time for delay or roadblocks. AARP is redoubling our efforts to provide people 50-plus with trusted information about vaccines. In fact, as you just mentioned, we just published online guides for every state explaining how to get vaccines where you live, and we'll be updating them as we get more information. We are continuing to fight for older Americans to be prioritized in getting COVID-19 vaccines because the science has clearly shown that older people are at higher risk of death. There have been 420,000 deaths from COVID-19 and 95 percent of those have been people 50-plus. Forty percent of COVID deaths have also been people who live and work in nursing homes, despite being only 1 percent of the population. Now at the federal level, we were pleased to see the Biden administration's focus on vaccine distribution, including protecting long-term care residents and staff who have been devastated by this pandemic. And we are also urging that vaccinations be made available through mobile vaccine centers for those who are caught in their homes. We are also thankful to see proposals for new economic stimulus payments, additional funds for nutrition assistance, paid sick and family leave to keep families healthy and aid to state and local governments who have been so hard hit by this crisis. We urge quick federal action on these policies. AARP has also been very active at the state level. Our state and committed volunteers from 16 AARP state offices are participating in formal work groups led by their governors and state health departments. This includes Idaho, North Carolina, Tennessee, California and many others. And AARP advocates in every single state are urging governors and state legislators to improve information and coordination on the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. Meanwhile, we're advocating to protect programs like aging services, home and community-based care, low-income energy assistance and unemployment and job assistance programs. None of this work, fighting for our nearly 38 million members, would be possible without the dedication and passion of AARP staff and volunteers and grassroots advocates nationwide. And we know many of them are on this call today. To stay up to date on all of these efforts and find summaries of state plans for vaccination distribution, please visit aarp.org/coronavirus. Thanks so much, thanks Bill and thanks to all of our expert panelists.

Bill Walsh: OK, thanks so much for that update, Nancy. It's now time to address your questions about the coronavirus with Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka and Clarence Anthony. Now I'd like to bring in my AARP colleague, Jean Setzfand, to help facilitate your calls today. Welcome, Jean.

Jean Setzfand: Thanks so much, Bill. I'm delighted to be here for this important conversation.

Bill Walsh: All right, who is first on the line?

Jean Setzfand: Our first caller is the Celestine from Michigan.

Bill Walsh: Hi, Celestine. Welcome to the program. Go ahead with your call.

Celestine: I wanted to ask a question. I'm 75 years old, and I've been trying to figure out when will I be able to get that vaccine?

Bill Walsh: When you'll be able to get the vaccine.

Celestine: Yeah, I stay in Michigan (inaudible).

Bill Walsh: OK. Very good. Dr. Johnson, do you want to address that?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, happy to address it. Thanks for your question. I'm more familiar with my home state of Colorado. Certainly age 75 fits into one of the priorities for the CDC guidance on who should get immunized, vaccinated. And we're certainly doing that for people age 70 and over. Other states are actually doing it for age 65 and over. So you should certainly qualify for an early vaccine. Part of the question, and Bill maybe AARP has some resources for Michigan, is kind of the method there. So, for example, in Colorado, we have a vaccine hotline that people can call so that they can be matched up with providers that are providing the vaccine. I will mention, just in our health care system here, we have a hundred thousand people over age 70, so even people that are a priority, it may take several weeks. But you certainly need to kind of get on a list for a vaccine. And I don't know if any of our other experts can kind of provide some more local advice for how to handle that in Michigan.

Bill Walsh: Clarence, do you have any recommendations for Celestine for local resources she could reach out to?

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, I was actually going back to your recommendation. First of all, it does include one of the barriers, and that is trying to go back and look at the state website to identify where she can access the vaccine. The other thing is, again it gets back to that technology use, being able to do simple things like asking your kids or a neighbor or a family member to help you to get in line to get the vaccine, because most often you have to register to get an appointment, which again, can be a barrier to some. And I think the other thing is to access some of the county health department information and see if they can help you by getting you registered. What Celestine is raising up is clearly a coordination and information issue because there's no question that she should be in that first level of priority. So I'm hopeful that she has that support system around her.

Bill Walsh: Right (inaudible) ... go ahead. I'm sorry.

Steven Johnson: Yeah, Bill, I was just going to say another resource would be your local physician. I certainly provide that role to all of my patients who call me, and I can direct them to how they can access, get on the list and so on. And so, for example, the vaccine hotline. So if Celestine has a primary care physician, I imagine that would be a source of advice.

Bill Walsh: That's a very good suggestion. And while we've been talking, our excellent staff here at AARP has pulled up the guidelines for Michigan. And I've got a couple of tips for you, Celestine. You can call the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. They have a toll-free number to find out if you're eligible and how to book an appointment. That number is (888) 535-6136. Or you can send them an email at COVID-19@michigan.gov. We also see here that in Michigan, folks 65 and older are eligible to be vaccinated first. And so that's sounds like good news for you Celestine. So, Jean who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Miriam from Pennsylvania.

Bill Walsh: Hey, Miriam, go ahead with your question.

Miriam: Now that I'm listening to all of this information, I'm kind of eerie about wanting to go into a home. We're both elderly, my husband and I, we're in our 90s, and we gotta get out of our home and get into a health home. So the question is, how am I supposed to get into a home, a senior home, if all of this is taking place?

Bill Walsh: That's a terrific question. Lori, can you address that for Miriam and others who might be interested?

Lori Smetanka: Sure, I know that that's been a big concern for people throughout this pandemic, thinking about if you need some additional assistance or are looking to move into either an assisted-living or a senior residence where you can get some additional services. And I think that you need to be asking questions before you go into a facility that could help you determine, number one, if you could maybe get some services in your own home. So maybe your local area agency on aging can work with you on helping to assess if you can actually get people to come into your own home and provide some additional supports for you. But if you do think that you're thinking about moving into another residence where you can get some additional services, ask them questions about how they're handling the COVID crisis. Ask them what protections they're putting into place for their residents there and how they're making sure that they and the staff are being protected. Do they have enough people on hand to provide services? Do they have enough protective equipment and masks for everyone, for example, and what are the vaccination rates that are there so that you know whether or not other residents and staff are being vaccinated. And also ask about any outbreaks related to COVID. You may find that some of the places that you're looking at have not had outbreaks, and you might be more likely to direct your attention to those than others. But asking questions, I think, is a really good idea.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you very much for that, Lori. And thanks Miriam for that question. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Karen from Wisconsin.

Bill Walsh: Hey Karen, go ahead with your question.

Karen: Yes. My question is in regarding to the vaccine itself. If someone in your household has received the vaccine, is it possible for them in the few days after they've received it to transmit the virus to others in the household?

Bill Walsh: Interesting question. Dr. Johnson, can you answer that question from Karen?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, that's an excellent question. All of the vaccines, the two vaccines that are available, and really, the other three or four vaccines that are in advanced states of development; none of them are live vaccines. So there is no risk of somebody who's getting the vaccine transmitting the virus to others. However, there is a question about whether the vaccine fully protects against infection or whether it prevents more from people getting ill. So one of the unanswered questions is if somebody gets a vaccine, and then a month from now is exposed to COVID-19, could they still acquire maybe a milder infection and then transmit it. But in terms of the immediate aftermath of vaccine, there is no risk of anything in the vaccine being transmitted to others.

Bill Walsh: I suppose though it speaks to the point you were making earlier about the need for continued social distancing and mask-wearing, even once you've taken the vaccine.

Steven Johnson: Yes. I think that's the primary advice. There is kind of a recent communication from the CDC about health care workers, not necessarily needing to quarantine a full two weeks if they've gotten the vaccine. That's one bit of information that's a little bit different. But I think until we know more, we would like the measures that everyone has taken to prevent acquisition of COVID-19 so far to continue exactly in the same way after their vaccines until we know more.

Bill Walsh: And I know the science is still a bit light on this, Dr. Johnson, but do we have a sense of how much protection that first dose gives you? Obviously, the FDA is recommending people get two doses of these first two vaccines. How much protection do people have if they've just gotten the one?

Steven Johnson: So, we do think that one dose provide some protection and in the initial studies of the Pfizer vaccine, individuals who were 10 days out from their first dose, seemed to be at low risk for developing an infection. But we don't know the degree to which that first dose protects and also how long it protects. Oftentimes a booster dose is meant to not only strengthen the immune system, but lead to a longer period of time of protection. And if you follow the news, the country of Israel has been very aggressive in rolling out vaccine. And they've actually reported that they think some of their individuals who have gotten one dose of the vaccine have acquired COVID-19 in-between the two doses. And so I would want people to kind of view that first dose as important, but also view the second dose as essential.

Bill Walsh: Very good. Well, thanks for that. And Miriam, I don't know if you are still on the line, but I wanted to call out a resource for you and others who had questions about COVID and nursing homes and assisted-living facilities. AARP has created an online resource so you can see details of every facility, or at least most of them around the country. And that's aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. A little snapshot of each of the facilities around the country, or at least those that are reporting data. And it might give you a high-level sense of infection rates in various facilities and precautions that they are taking. OK, Jean. Let's go back to the phones. Who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Dorothy from Massachusetts.

Bill Walsh: Hey, Dorothy, welcome to the program.

Dorothy: Yes.

Bill Walsh: Go ahead with your question.

Dorothy: My question is, is there are many of us that do not have a computer, I'm a senior, I'm 87, my husband's 90. And we are both handicapped, and nobody has even discussed what to do about the people that cannot leave their homes. There's many of us that still live at home and there's been no consideration about sending someone to take care of us because we're unable to go and sit for two or three hours. We barely can stand. And that's the big problem for I think the seniors, and there's been no question about it. Thank you.

Bill Walsh: Let me ask you, Dorothy. Have you gotten any outreach about the vaccine? Have you signed up on any list yet?

Dorothy: No, we can't. No, I have not.

Bill Walsh: OK.

Dorothy: We couldn't even get out and be tested because the lines were too long, three or four hours in the car was just impossible.

Bill Walsh: Right. No, I hear you. Clarence, can you address that question from Dorothy? I think it's a question a lot of people have.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah. I agree with Dorothy. That is one of the barriers that we are seeing with the health department's websites, the access to technology. I do think the important thing is to pick up the phone and call your local health department and to make sure that they know that you qualify, and that they have programs where they would actually help you get the vaccine, or put you in line to be able to get it. I think, you know, cities like New York City and that's not a common-size city in a way, but they have a "Vaccine for All" transportation program, which assists people 65 and older to be able to get them to the vaccine sites and get them not to have to wait, but to move them right through the program site. The city of Tallahassee, Florida, provides buses to and from the vaccine sites. And those kinds of things are really helpful. But I do think there are special cases that we are going to have to look at, and that is those that are not able to stand in line. They're not able to go out there for two hours. And a lot of the health departments and states are starting to look at those programs. But right now, I think that that's the biggest barrier that we're seeing nationally.

Bill Walsh: Right, OK, thank you for that, Clarence. And Dorothy I wanted to, while Clarence was talking, our excellent AARP staff was looking up some information on Massachusetts and found out a couple of things. The first thing is that starting February 1, people 75 and older in Massachusetts will be able to make an appointment to get the vaccine. We also have a number for you to call there. It's the Massachusetts Health Department. That number is (617) 624-6000. They should be able to give you information on where to go and how to sign up for the vaccine in Massachusetts. OK, Jean. Who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Eileen from California.

Bill Walsh: Hi, Eileen. Welcome to the program. Go ahead with your question. Eileen, are you with us?

Eileen: Hi, I'm 95, and I have like a 17 different medicines that I'm allergic to, and I was wondering if I should get that shot or not.

Bill Walsh: That's a very good question. Dr. Johnson, can you address that for Eileen and others who have allergies to medicines?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, thank you for your question. And that actually has been well studied so far. Fortunately, with both the Pfizer and the Moderna vaccine, the risk of an allergic reaction is very low. In saying that, there have been some allergic reactions, and one of the risks for an allergic reaction is individuals that have a history of a number of allergies. But the only real contraindication to the vaccine is if you are allergic to components of the vaccine. And the vaccine, in addition to the genetic material of the virus, the messenger RNA, there are some fats that we call lipids, and there's a few other chemicals, and so on. We have been routinely vaccinating individuals at our center that have a history of allergies, and the only kind of, I think, additional precaution is that individuals with allergies are monitored in the clinic a bit longer. Most individuals, once they've got the vaccine are allowed to leave after 15 minutes, but the recommendation is for people that have multiple allergies, that they wait for 30 minutes. An allergic reaction is something we can handle, and I still feel the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccine far outweigh the risks.

Bill Walsh: So, for Eileen, would you recommend that she sign up to get the vaccine and tell whoever's giving her the shot, ‘Hey, I'm allergic to these 17 medicines’ to kind of put them on notice so they can watch her?

Steven Johnson: I think that's a great idea. And I actually think that would happen anyways. When you come for your vaccine, one of the routine parts of counseling is looking at your list of allergies. And if there's anything on that allergy list that raises a concern, that should be detected by the health care personnel. But I think you can help by making sure that your list of allergies is complete and to let the health care provider administering the vaccine know about those allergies.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you for that, Dr. Johnson. Jean, let's take another call.

Jean Setzfand: Sounds good. We've gotten a lot of calls, but we also have a lot of YouTube questions that I've been putting off. So let me go there. So Linda from YouTube is asking a similar question, "I've heard one should not take anti-inflammatory medicines, like aspirin, Advil, Motrin prior to taking the vaccine. Can you clarify? And if so, how soon after taking the vaccine, can you take those meds?"

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, thank you for that question. I want to make sure that we answer this correctly. There was, this is a teeny bit off topic, but there was concern at one point that anti-inflammatory agents might have an adverse outcome in individuals when they develop COVID-19, and that's really been disproven. In terms of anti-inflammatory agents around the vaccine, you know, if it's not necessary to take those additional medications, I think it's reasonable to not take them. The anti-inflammatory medications that we'd be most concerned about would be steroid type of medications, because steroids can weaken your immune system and consequently then can lessen your response to the vaccine. So those might be medications like prednisone or hydrocortisone, other steroids, and so on. The other issue that comes up is can you use anti-inflammatories or pain medications after the vaccine, just because there are some side effects that can occur including arm pain and fever and so on. You know, my advice is for people not to be miserable, but in general, I advise people to use a medication like Acetaminophen or something like that, to deal with vaccine related side effects. But the major anti-inflammatory issue prior to the vaccine would be steroid medications.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you for that. Jean, let's take another question.

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Frank from Pennsylvania.

Bill Walsh: Hey Frank, go ahead with your question.

Frank: My mom is 90-some years old. I know they're going to be going into the nursing homes to give the senior citizens the vaccines. If she refuses to take the vaccine, and I have power of attorney, can I override that and force them to take the vaccine? And what happens if after the fact, they go in, and how do we go about getting the vaccine to her? By after the fact, I'm saying they go in, and give the patients the vaccine, and she hasn't got that. How do we go about taking care of that?

Bill Walsh: OK, Frank. Lori, do you want to tackle that question?

Lori Smetanka: Sure. So I think if there's concern from your mother about the vaccine, I think we should try to get her information about the safety of it, and why it's a good idea for her to take it. If she's competent and able to make her own decisions, then certainly she should be able to do that. And we know that for many people, if they are hesitant to take the vaccine, oftentimes doing some education has been the factor to encourage them to reconsider and actually to take that. So, if you are concerned about her willingness to take it, I would have some good conversation with her and ask the staff to talk with her, or her doctor to talk with her, about why it's important that she take it. For people who may refuse the first time that the clinics are being held, or the pharmacies, or whatever the process is in the nursing home, there should be opportunities at later dates for people to get the vaccine. And that's something that we would encourage you to talk to the facility administration about, on how they're going to ensure that people who maybe later on change their mind, or want to take the vaccine, or even for new people coming in, that they will take it. So, have some conversation with your mother, talk to the administrator and her doctor about what the processes can be and how to make sure that she can get it if she needs it.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you for that, Lori. And thanks for all those great questions. We're going to take more of your questions soon. I'd like to turn to our experts. Clarence, you've heard in a lot of the calls we've gotten so far, people are having trouble figuring out where to start to sign up for the vaccine. What's your advice? What's the first point of contact people should be thinking about in their communities if they want to reach out and find out about how to get the vaccine. And let's assume they may not have internet access.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, I think that's a challenge that we are seeing right now all over America. My first point of recommendation and Dr. Johnson sort of shared that as well, I like the idea of talking to your physician or your doctor to see if they have information or they can, while you're there, access where you can find that information. I'll go back again to say that your city hall, your county health department is a place that they are there to direct you and provide that information to you. What we are seeing in terms of our mayors and council members all over America, is that they're partnering with their neighborhood groups, their associate, you know, their nonprofits. The YMCA has a great program and, of course, AARP has a great program to educate all the communities. The one community, again, that is still, it's lopsided for me, is that the greater need are some of the poorest and people of color communities, but the vaccine sites are not there. We have got to focus, and we have got to manage that type of access because people of color are contracting it three and four times higher, as well as, dying, because they don't have access. So our mayors and council members, city leaders, are partnering with everybody to try to get information there.

Bill Walsh: Well that's a very interesting point. I was going to touch on that next. How much are you seeing in terms of outreach to those communities around the country, and are we seeing much resistance to taking the vaccines? I know in some communities of color, there's some historical reluctance to trust the medical establishment.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, well, the National League of Cities is working on an initiative with the CEO of AARP, Ms. Jenkins, that we are going out, and we're starting to talk about education about the vaccine. Now we're not talking about you should or should not, because I do think those historical experiences that Black Americans have had with so many things, not just historical, but even looking at today, that we're shining a light on the inequities. And there is a lack of trust there at this time. So what our goal here is just to tell the vaccine facts and to share if you have certain health issues, this may not impact you. You still should get the vaccine as Dr. Johnson has indicated. So, I think that that's the first step, but we also must recognize the transportation limitations. And again, when we're talking about 65 and older population, there is a lot of education that we must do. And I think it's going to take all of us, the medical community and every part of our community to get people to trust that this vaccine is safe, and that if you want to live a quality life, that it's important that you get it.

Bill Walsh: Yeah. Well, thanks for that, Clarence. And as you referenced, AARP is doing what it can to get the facts out about the vaccine. If you want to find out how to get the vaccine near where you live, check out aarp.org/coronavirus. We have a tool there where you can just choose your state and see what your local state guidelines are. If you don't have access to the internet, I think Clarence provides some really good advice there. Call your doctor. That's a great first step. Call your local or state health department. Or call your local elected officials. That's why we elect them to help serve us and make sure in times of crisis; we get the answers that we all need. Let me turn to you again, Dr. Johnson. As Clarence referenced, COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on adults, older adults and people of color. What's being done to protect those most at risk in the pandemic? Are they being prioritized in the vaccine distribution?

Steven Johnson: Well, let me start with age. I think individuals above a certain age have been a really great priority. You know, health care workers were part of the initial phase. Nursing home residents and staff, but really, right after that has been individuals above a certain age. As I alluded to, different states are using different age cutoffs. In Colorado, we're using age 70 right now. What we've learned is that this group over 70 is really a very large group. So even though you prioritize individuals, it may take weeks with the current vaccine infrastructure and supply to get this population fully vaccinated. So that's been a big priority. I think it's a harder set of issues regarding people of color. And I would like my kind of colleagues to weigh in on this as well, because I think this is a multifactorial issue. On one hand, certain people of color may be at greater risk for being exposed to COVID-19, based on living conditions, based on work circumstances and so on. But that's a group that also may have less access to medical care, and may have some issues of trust, may have more vaccine hesitancy. So, I think we've seen lower rates of vaccination. I do know that our state and local governments in Colorado are recognizing this as an issue, that is, despite having guidelines based on age, certain people of color are not getting vaccinated as rapidly as others.

Bill Walsh: Hmm. OK. Let me ask you a quick follow-up to that. We've all been hearing so much about the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines that are being distributed now. What do we know about the other ones coming down the pike, like the AstraZeneca and the Johnson & Johnson candidates? Are they going to help ensure enough supply? And what do we know about their effectiveness?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, so, the remarkable thing about the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccines is, not only are they very effective, but the results are very similar, and they're so similar that we feel comfortable recommending to individuals that if they're offered one or the other, they should take either one because the effectiveness rate is roughly 95 percent. The side effect potential is similar and so on. It gets a bit different when we talk about other vaccines. We already know quite a bit about the AstraZeneca vaccine, which is not a live vaccine, but it's a different technology than the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. And there are more mixed results in terms of its effectiveness. There are certain subgroups that have a higher rate of success than others, and so it isn't quite as clean as the data with the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccine. As some of you may know, the AstraZeneca vaccine is being used in other countries, including the United Kingdom. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a very similar technology to the AstraZeneca vaccine. Again, it's not a live vaccine. The exciting thing about that vaccine is it's a single dose. And if that's successful, of course, that will be much more efficient than a two-dose series. We really expect to hear those results at any time. I think I joked to Bill that we might hear during the hour here. It's amazing how fast results come out with COVID-19. But we should hear about that soon. And once we know the results, we'll kind of know the impact that will have on the supply chain. One other vaccine that we're part of here at the University of Colorado is the Novavax vaccine, which is yet a different technology. So I'm encouraged by the number of vaccine candidates and hopefully these subsequent candidates will be as successful as the two vaccines we're currently using.

Bill Walsh: We sure hope so, and if a one of those vaccines gets approval or we see some data on that during the call, we will announce it here to our listeners live. Listen, for our listeners, I want to mention something. We're seeing a couple inquiries from folks saying, I'm waiting for my doctor to call me about the vaccine. This is not a time to wait for your doctor to call you. This is a time to advocate for yourself. Don't wait for the phone to ring. You need to be reaching out to get in line. If you're a caregiver, reach out on behalf of your loved ones. This is a time to advocate for yourself and for your loved ones because we know that these local governments are struggling with outreach and information. So take it upon yourself to get the information that you need.

OK, Lori, I wanted to ask you about nursing homes and assisted-living facilities. We've heard enormous frustration from our membership about not being able to see their loved ones, to be in contact with them. At what point do you think those facilities may begin easing restrictions that they've put in place? And do you think that some of those precautions are going to be permanent?

Lori Smetanka: Yeah, these are really great questions and ones that we hear a lot from our members as well, and questions we've been raising ourselves. We are still trying to get complete answers to this question from the government agencies that have put the visitation restrictions in place and have been talking with the federal agency that oversees nursing homes, the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, and they've indicated that they're going to be reviewing the visitation guidance and possibly reviewing it now that the vaccines are being distributed. But we don't know when or what that's going to look like. So we are continuing to advocate with the federal government, with the legislators, and are working with partners like AARP to establish safe visitation and facilities as soon as possible, because we do know that residents and families are extremely frustrated by the ongoing ban. They want to be reunited with their loved ones. And we also know that families provide a lot of support and care for their resident family members living in long-term care facilities, because too many facilities don't have enough staff available on a daily basis to provide care. So that's been a really big factor. But in the meantime, right now, long-term care facilities should be doing whatever they can to ensure proper infection control practices are in place, that they're continuing to continually assessing how they can offer safe visits, even right now, between residents and families, and they need to be working to meet the needs of each resident. Many families are qualifying for essential caregiving visits or compassionate care visits, and the goal is to get as many family members back in as soon as possible and to get the restrictions lifted as soon as possible.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you for that, Lori. And again, listeners, don't be shy about reaching out to the nursing homes and assisted-living facilities where your loved ones reside and asking them the tough questions. I want to repeat a terrific resource AARP created about what's happening inside of nursing homes. That's aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Go there to find out information about infection rates in nursing homes where your loved ones reside, precautions that are being taken. But by all means, if you have questions, pick up the phone and call them and advocate for your loved ones. Thank you so much, Lori, for that, and thanks to all our guests. We're going to get to more listener questions shortly, but I wanted to give a quick AARP Fraud Watch Alert Update. As the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine continues, scammers are looking for ways to take advantage. They are calling, sending emails and texts and placing fake ads to convince people they can jump to the front of the vaccine lines for a fee or by providing their Social Security number or other sensitive personal information. Know that any offer to skip the vaccine line is a scam. Always turn to trusted resource resources, such as your doctor or local health department for guidance regarding distribution of the vaccine. Visit aarp.org/fraudwatchnetwork to learn more about these and other scams, or you can call our Fraud Watch Network Helpline at 877-908-3360. Now it's time to address more of your questions with Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka and Clarence Anthony. Jean, who do we have on the line right now?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Paul from Pennsylvania.

Bill Walsh: Hey Paul, go ahead with your question.

Paul: Why thank you. Yes, and thank you for taking my call. I'm 71 years old. I have not yet been vaccinated, but I'm certainly looking forward to it. And I was wondering that after vaccination will I still need to wear a mask, and will I still need to avoid gatherings like family gatherings, even if all the attendees have been vaccinated or have had COVID?

Bill Walsh: OK. Dr. Johnson, I think we've touched on this before. Could you reiterate your guidance for Paul and for others who are wondering about that?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, thank you for your question, Paul. We don't know precisely who the subset are that don't get protected with the vaccine, number one. Number two, we're not sure how long the protection lasts, and number three, we're not sure whether the vaccine prevents disease and still allowing infection. So I think the advice that I would recommend, I actually heard Dr. Fauci last night on the TV talking about it, is that the availability of the vaccine and getting the vaccine at the current time should not alter the other preventive measures that you are taking. So I would not loosen up any of the strategies that you've used so far to avoid COVID-19. Now six months from now, or 12 months from now, when we know quite a bit more about the vaccine effects and know the state of the pandemic, we might have different advice, but we certainly want to err on the side of caution that people use the same measures.

Bill Walsh: OK, and Clarence from the National League of Cities, I wonder if you're seeing examples of mayors around the country who are setting that example of social distancing and mask-wearing to folks who live in their jurisdictions.

Clarence Anthony: (inaudible) campaign, if you will, for the last 10, 11 months. And there is this recognition that's important to have your mask and practice social distance and washing your hands. And I think that some have been caught not doing that, having family gatherings and going out to dinner. And what has been positive is that the feedback from the community is that you're saying that we should do that, but you're not. So I think that local leaders are saying, we're not traveling because we've asked you not to travel. We've asked you to wear your mask. And I think that that has been a positive behavior change and modeling that with their residents. You know, one of the things I want to also mention in here as the callers listen, our rural communities, those that are 20,000 smaller communities, is an area that I think we are very concerned about making sure that information and vaccine distribution gets to those cities. And I would venture to say that many of the callers, you're from those areas, and I would encourage you to go to your health department, call your doctor, be an advocate for yourself because sometimes we think about the Washington, D.C.’s, the Chicago’s, and other major cities. But I think that one of the things that I want to lift up is that we know that you're there in the smaller rural cities, and AARP, National League of Cities and others, we want to work with you to get you this information. So, I want to just make that point as well.

Bill Walsh: All right, thank you for that, Clarence. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Anne from Ohio.

Bill Walsh: Hey Anne, go ahead with your question.

Anne: Hello. While I was listening, you addressed my question regarding the nursing homes and how soon we would be able to get back in there. So I'm going to bow out, and let someone else take the next question.

Bill Walsh: OK, all right. Thanks very much for that. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller, I'm actually going to pull one from YouTube. And we have a question from Uda, I'm sorry if I'm pronouncing that incorrectly, but Uda's asking, "How long does the vaccine last?"

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson, do you have any insight on that? I'm not sure we have the data to tell us that.

Steven Johnson: Yeah, I think maybe a three-word answer, I don't know, would suffice. These vaccine trials, these Phase 3 vaccine trials were started in July of 2020, so we're just about six months into it. And individuals who have been part of these vaccine trials, many of them are continuing on the trials for up to two years or more. And so that's one of the issues that we need to learn about. How long is protection? Will a booster be necessary? If a booster is necessary, what is the timing? So I think we'll learn more about that, but we don't know right now. I mean I think the conventional wisdom is that there would be months of protection, but how that would translate into years, we'll just have to figure it out when we get there.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you very much. Jean, who is next on the line?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Jill from New Jersey.

Bill Walsh: Hey, Jill, welcome to the program, and go ahead with your question.

Jill: Hi, well most of my question was answered, but I'm worried about my uncle who is 82 years old. He has an appointment for April 5 that he made in the beginning of January. So as the supply increases, will they be, the elderly who are not in nursing homes or assisted-living or whatever, will the other people be moved up in the queue, I would assume.

Bill Walsh: In priority. Yeah. So, your uncle was not in a facility at this point.

Jill: No, but he has a lot of medical issues, and I'm just worried about him.

Bill Walsh: Sure, no, I understand. Dr. Johnson, I wonder if you can talk a little bit about prioritization. Her uncle is 82. I'm a little surprised to hear that he's going to have to wait until April 5 to get an appointment.

Steven Johnson: Yeah, I alluded to the fact that even when you use an age cutoff, there still are many people above that age, and of course, we're viewing this as a universal vaccine. You know, we want to get the whole world vaccinated essentially. So in our situation here in Colorado, it's going to take a number of weeks to actually get individuals over 70 vaccinated. In saying that, April does seem farther out than I would have predicted. I'm certainly hoping that here in Colorado we get the over 70 individuals immunized sooner. I think, hopefully by the end of February. So I think it's worth maybe talking with his physician and kind of find out what the story is there. In terms of the other part of the question, certainly if there are successes in ramping up production of the current vaccines, if there is the authorization of either the AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson vaccine, the supply increases, and we improve kind of the logistics of administering the vaccines, I would presume that people within a certain priority would get sooner vaccine appointments. That would be the ethical approach.

Bill Walsh: Right, and while Dr. Johnson was talking, Jill, our staff pulled up some information on New Jersey, and in New Jersey people 65 and older are eligible for the vaccine. One thing you might do is check out the COVID-19 vaccine page in New Jersey or call this toll-free number. It is 855-568-0545, and that's just for New Jersey, but maybe they can give you some information about how to get your uncle in sooner. He certainly seems to be eligible. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: We have another question coming in from Facebook. And I think this alludes to what Clarence talked about earlier about rural communities. (inaudible) is saying, "One problem I'm encountering is that aged individuals, people have to travel far, long distances to wait a long time to get a vaccine. Is there anything that can be done to fix this?"

Bill Walsh: Clarence, do you want to address that? I mean, this is a huge issue, I think, particularly in rural areas, but not just in urban areas, in rural areas. Getting on a vaccine list is one thing. Getting to the vaccine is quite another for people.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, I think that's right. And a lot of my answers may sound, as if they're scientific or professional, but it's just my feeling that we got to think about this logically. And one of the things I'm seeing is that the drug stores and the grocery stores that are being used, oftentimes we deal with rural communities that don't have those drugstores, don't have that named, high quality, drugstore. And so what we have to do is not create outcomes or create plans that don't accommodate the real people in the rural parts or in the neighborhoods that are food deserts, that don't have those kinds of facilities, even in urban communities. So what we're working with our mayors to do is to work with the health department and to advocate at the state level to put vaccine sites in those churches perhaps, if we can package them and refrigerate them, of course, appropriately, community centers, and if they have a grocery store. It doesn't have to be a Harris Teeter, or in Florida where I'm from, a Publix. It could be another unnamed grocery store. We just have to think about the people in our strategies. And I think our mayors and council members are advocating on behalf of their residents, and they're listening. And so that's what I think we need to do is to create real plans that are affective, because right now we have a shortage, and when you have a shortage, I don't think you're going to really think about those that are in those kinds of rural communities. And we must.

Bill Walsh: And I love your suggestion about churches, community centers, grocery stores, as being spots where vaccines can be administered. What about mobile clinics? Are you hearing much about those? I mean, that seems like one way to reach folks in rural areas.

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, we have heard, that not only mobile clinics, but mobile libraries, because again, some of those communities don't have those in their area. And we've been advocating for those as well. And I'm hoping that we will be able to get it to them. Again, I think, there are states, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and others, Florida, that's having a shortage, and we've just got to figure out a way to get it to those that are more challenged because I think right now, that's what we're concerned about.

Bill Walsh: Sure. OK, thank you for that Clarence. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Grace from New York.

Bill Walsh: Hey Grace, welcome to the program. Go ahead with your question.

Grace: Thank you. My question is, I was sick with apparently the virus in April, and at that time they were telling people to stay at home if you had a fever, which I did. I had a fever for about a week or so. I was sick. I ended up staying home for the whole month. So at the time I didn't get the PCR test. After that, I had the PCR test in May, and it was negative. In June, I had the serology test, and that was positive saying that I was exposed. I've been tested with the PCR test a couple of times since then because of prerequisites for some medical tests — all negative. And I was tested for the antibody on Saturday, Jan. 23, and it says that I'm still positive for antibodies. And so, I think that's the result that we want to get from the vaccine. Does anyone have any knowledge that's through a doctor, and I will contact my doctors, but does anyone know about if somebody is positive for the antibodies should they get the vaccine?

Bill Walsh: OK. Dr. Johnson, can you handle that question?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, that's a great question. First of all, I think the test results that you have told me, indicate that you probably did have COVID-19. And it seems likely that that illness that you had was related, of course you can't be for sure. Certainly individuals who have blood test evidence of prior COVID-19 are candidates for the vaccine, and, in fact, of some of those individuals were actually included in the vaccine trials. And even individuals who had blood tests that were positive for COVID-19 had enhanced protection by getting the vaccine. So one of the concerns is that COVID-19, the infection itself, doesn't necessarily prevent against reinfection. We do think from studies of health care workers and so on that there probably is some protection after infection that lasts several months or so, but the CDC has revised its guidelines and really says that individuals who developed COVID-19, as long as their symptoms have resolved and they're out of the quarantine period, they should be candidates for the vaccine. There is only one kind of precaution and that is, if, as part of your treatment, you received these antibody therapies that we call either monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, then it's recommended that you wait 90 days because the concern is those antibodies may interfere with the vaccine performance. But based on what you've told me, I would sign up for the vaccine, and I would get the vaccine as soon as it's available for you.

Bill Walsh: OK, Dr. Johnson. Thanks for that answer. And Grace, thanks for that call. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Arvin from New Jersey.

Bill Walsh: Hey, Arvin, go ahead with your question.

Arvin: My question is like the people who get the first vaccine, and they cannot get the second vaccine because it's not available, and do they have to go back to that first vaccine again to get a second?

Bill Walsh: That's an interesting question. Dr. Johnson, can you address that? I wonder if this is becoming a common occurrence around the country. People have gotten the first vaccine, but because of shortages or whatever, they haven't gotten the second one. I guess there are two questions here — one is at what point should you go back and get, I guess, a first dose again? And second, do you have to get the same vaccine or can you get a different one?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, this has been a developing story. You know, the Centers for Disease Control has a committee called the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and that really is the kind of national body that provides vaccine recommendations. And certainly early on there were recommendations that you should not interchange the vaccines, and you should get the vaccines at the exact intervals that are recommended, which is three weeks apart for the Pfizer vaccine and four weeks apart for the Moderna vaccine. There has been a little bit of loosening up in the latest guidance from this vaccine body that the second dose can be given as late as six weeks after the first dose, and that if the second dose from the one manufacturer is not available, that you can give the second dose from the other manufacturer. So, there is a little more flexibility. I think it's really important in terms of our nationwide vaccine distribution to kind of minimize these types of situations. But those are a couple accommodations that the vaccine recommendations have listed so that people can get that second dose and get that protection.

Bill Walsh: Now if you're outside that six-week window, to Arvin's question, what should you do? I mean, should you look at it as if that initial dose is no longer valid and get back in line to get a first dose?

Steven Johnson: Well, that's a question that I don't know the answer to because I don't think that there is really, in the current kind of vaccine triage that we're in, I think that the likelihood of kind of getting three doses of vaccine in the foreseeable future seems unlikely. So I think we're probably going to have some situations where somebody actually gets a second dose of vaccine outside of the window that we recommend. And I think the CDC acknowledges that. So I do think a second dose at any time is probably going to be acknowledged as a second dose. As kind of a related phenomenon, we need to kind of learn about how we know that people are actually protected. Are there blood tests that we can do? So, especially for individuals who get the vaccine in an unorthodox schedule, or individuals whose immune system is weakened, how we can kind of determine that they've developed an adequate response to the vaccines. But I suspect this guidance is going to evolve further as more and more people get involved in this type of situation.

Bill Walsh: OK, Dr. Johnson. Thanks so much for that. Jean, who is our next caller?

Jean Setzfand: We have another question coming in from Facebook, from Nanae, and she's asking, "There's so many rumors about what's in the vaccine and it causing death. How can I be sure that I'm not in danger of this?"

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson, what about misinformation out there about what's in the vaccine and what harm it could cause?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, I think some of the concern is the fact that the two vaccines that are available are a relatively new technology, this messenger RNA, which is a new type of vaccine. But really these vaccines have been under study for many years. And the safety profile looks great at this point. And it's actually unusual in the history of vaccines for there to be some side effect of a vaccine that's not discovered until years later. And if you think about the fact that hundreds of thousands and now millions of individuals have received the vaccine, every day we're getting another million days of exposure and so on. So, I'm comfortable as a health care provider. I got the vaccine and had no hesitation and so on. And, of course, when we do anything in medicine, we always look at the benefits of doing something versus the risks of not doing something. And the risk of not getting the vaccine and then developing COVID-19 is really a great concern.

Bill Walsh: Lori, I wonder if you could weigh in, in this as well. I mean, maybe from the family caregiver point of view, if you're hearing different information or claims about the vaccines, are there good sources you would point people to get the facts?

Lori Smetanka: We've been directing people to the CDC, for sure, for the most up-to-date information about the vaccines. And they have been updating and revising their guidance on a regular basis. And I think that they have a good set of resources for not only professionals, but also for family members, for consumers, and for the average person who may need good information about the vaccine and questions that may be relating to it. So, we have been encouraging people to go to the CDC website at cdc.gov.

Bill Walsh: OK. And Clarence, what about at the local level? What is the, you talked about this a little bit earlier, but can you reiterate the best sources of information about both COVID and the vaccines at the local level?

Clarence Anthony: Yeah, I'm going to second, Dr. Johnson's recommendation on the first, and that is, go to your doctor if you have access to a doctor, your county health department, and then your city hall, your mayors and your leaders on the local level, they really do have a lot of information, and using different techniques to try to get you that information and to get you access. And this is so important that you, again, advocate on behalf of yourself here because if you are qualified to get the vaccine, you should be able to get access to that vaccine because this is about your health and this is about your life and your quality of life. So we want to be helpful. So reach out to your local leaders.

Bill Walsh: Thank you so much for that, Clarence, and all of our ... oh, go ahead, Dr. Johnson.

Steven Johnson: Yeah, I was reading the CDC guidance, and there is a mention that if individuals get a second dose beyond six weeks after the first dose, there was no need to restart the series. So the advice is that get that second dose, and unfortunately, if it's delayed beyond some certain point, it's still counted as a second dose. So there's no restarting the vaccine at this time.

Bill Walsh: OK, thanks that clarification. And thank you to all of our guests. We're near the bottom of the hour, and I wanted to ask each of our three experts for any closing thoughts or recommendations that our listeners should take away from our discussion today. Dr. Johnson, would you like to go first?

Steven Johnson: Yeah, I would just say trust the science, trust the vaccines, get the vaccines as soon as possible, but continue to use the other safety measures that we know help to prevent you from getting COVID-19.

Bill Walsh: OK, thank you very much. Lori Smetanka, do you have any closing thoughts or recommendations?

Lori Smetanka: Yes, absolutely. For you and your loved ones in long-term care facilities, stay informed about what's happening in the facility. Ask a lot of questions of the administrator about what's happening, and if you need help, contact your long-term care ombudsman program for assistance.

Bill Walsh: OK, and Clarence Anthony, I'll give you the last word.

Clarence Anthony: Well, the only thing I'll say is thanks to AARP for this opportunity to uplift this important conversation about the challenges and the questions that residents are having about the access to the vaccine. And I want to just say, as Dr. Johnson, believe in the science and advocate for yourself, and make sure you get access to the vaccine, because this is about the quality of life that you'd like to have. And your mayors and council members and your cities are partners. And thank you again for having us.

Bill Walsh: OK. And thanks to each of our guests for being on the panel today. It's been a really informative discussion and thank you, our AARP members and volunteers and listeners for participating today. AARP, a nonprofit, nonpartisan member organization has been working to promote the health and well-being of older Americans for more than 60 years. In the face of this crisis, we're providing information and resources to help older adults and those caring for them protect themselves from the virus, prevent its spread to others while taking care of themselves. All of the resources we referenced today, including a recording of today's Q&A event, can be found at aarp.org/coronavirus beginning tomorrow, Jan. 29. Go there if your question was not addressed, and you'll find the latest updates, as well as information created specifically for older adults and family caregivers. We hope you learned something that can help keep you and your loved ones healthy. Please tune in tonight at 7 p.m. ET for a special live event, "A Virtual World Awaits," where we'll explore resources to help you learn, grow and develop new skills to take care of your mind, body and health during the pandemic. Thank you, and have a good day. This concludes our call.

Tele-Town Hall 012821 1 PM Transcript With Timestamps

Bill Walsh:  Hello, I am AARP Vice President Bill Walsh, and I want to welcome you to this important discussion about the coronavirus. Before we begin, if you'd like to hear this telephone town hall in Spanish, press *0 on your telephone keypad now. AARP, a nonprofit, nonpartisan member organization has been working to promote the health and well-being of older Americans for more than 60 years. In the face of the global coronavirus pandemic, AARP is providing information and resources to help older adults and those caring for them. As many of you have seen as we close out the first month of the new year, the pandemic is continuing to show signs of worsening. Yet we continue to see major challenges in distributing the vaccine. Consumers are frustrated by confusing systems for signing up for a shot, and local governments are struggling to keep up with demand. And, unfortunately, where the need is greatest in nursing homes and long-term care facilities, millions are still unvaccinated. We'll address these issues and more with our expert panel and take your questions.

[00:01:14] If you've participated in one of our tele-town halls in the past, you know this is similar to a radio talk show, and you have the opportunity to ask questions live. For those of you joining us on the phone, if you'd like to ask a question, press *3 on your telephone keypad to be connected with an AARP staff member who will note your name and question and place you in a queue to ask that question live. If you're joining on Facebook or YouTube, you can post your question in the comments section.

[00:02:10] Joining us today are Steven C. Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Anschutz Medical Campus Multidisciplinary Center on Aging. Also Lori Smetanka, executive director of the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, which is the leading national nonprofit advocacy organization representing consumers receiving long-term care services. And finally, Mr. Clarence Anthony, chief executive officer of the National League of Cities representing America's cities. We'll also be joined by my AARP colleague Jean Setzfand, who will help facilitate your calls today.

[00:02:56] This event is being recorded, and you can access that recording at aarp.org/coronavirus 24 hours after we wrap up.

[00:03:21] Now I'd like to bring in our guests, each of whom have joined us for tele-town hall events before. So I'm delighted to welcome them back. First, we have Steven C. Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Anschutz Medical Campus Multidisciplinary Center on Aging. Dr. Johnson serves on the National Institutes of Health panel on the management of COVID-19. Thanks for being here again, Dr. Johnson.

[00:03:50]Steven Johnson:  Thank you, Bill. Glad to be here.

[00:03:52]Bill Walsh:  All right, delighted to have you. We also have Lori Smetanka. She is the executive director of the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care. That organization is the leading national nonprofit advocacy organization representing consumers who receive long-term care and services in nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and home and community-based settings. She is responsible for the strategic direction of the organization. Welcome back, Lori.

[00:03:59]Lori Smetanka:  Thanks so much for having me again. Glad to be here.

[00:03:59]Bill Walsh:  All right. Thank you. And Clarence Anthony is the chief executive officer of the National League of Cities, the voice of America's cities, towns and villages, representing more than 200 million people. Clarence began his career in public service as the mayor of South Bay, Florida. Thanks for joining us, Clarence.

[00:04:47]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, thank you so much for having me. It's a joy to be back here again today.

[00:04:51]Bill Walsh:  All right. Thanks for being with us. Let's go ahead and get started with our discussion. Dr. Johnson, let's start with you. We've heard the Biden administration's goal of a hundred million vaccine doses in the first hundred days. Is that doable in your opinion? And what's being done to make that goal a reality?

[00:05:23]Steven Johnson:  Well, thanks for that question. First of all, I think it is doable. And in fact, there have been a couple of days where the number of vaccines distributed have been close to a million, so I think it is achievable. You know, I think it starts with, of course, the supply of vaccine itself, and so the degree to which the two authorized vaccines can be produced and distributed is important. Certainly, if some of the other vaccines that are under study become available under an emergency use authorization, and the supply is increased, that would be great. There are some issues, I think, at the state level. I think we've recognized that there's a difference between the number of vaccines that have been received versus the number that had been administered. And part of that has been related to state practices of holding back doses so that they're assured that the second dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are available. But I think we need to work on logistics in terms of distribution. And then I think we need to work on methods to increase administration at the state and local level, which may involve large vaccine events; it may involve, military assistance, things like that. I think the goal is achievable, but it would be ideal to have a higher goal because one million a day for a population of 331 million, it still would take a long time to roll out the vaccine.

[00:07:00]Bill Walsh:  Sure, well thank you for that. Let me switch gears a little bit. We're hearing news about a more contagious COVID-19 variant. What do we know about that? And how will the current preventative steps such as mask-wearing and the social distancing work against new variants? And do we know anything about the vaccines’ effectiveness against those variants?

[00:07:24]Steven Johnson:  Well, I'd start with a few basic points, and that is that viruses do mutate, they change. You know, a good example of that is the influenza virus where we have to reengineer a vaccine each year based on the changes in the strain, but coronaviruses also mutate, and we've recognized new strains since the beginning of the pandemic. But there are some new strains that are concerning. You likely have heard of strains from the United Kingdom, from South Africa and Brazil. What we seem to know most about right now is that they're more transmissible. And of course, viruses that are more transmissible mean more people will get infected, and then, you know, the consequences of that. We know less about how the virus affects individuals once they're infected. There is some preliminary data from the United Kingdom that these variants could be more dangerous than the original circulating coronavirus.

[00:08:27] Now in terms of whether the vaccines will be effective, I think the conventional wisdom right now is that they will remain effective. The companies and researchers have been testing the antibody responses to these vaccines. And, in most cases, the vaccines seem to work, although you may have heard about somewhere where maybe they're somewhat less effective. But the vaccines induce a very broad response from your body's immune system. So our hope is that these vaccines will work. I think it's quite possible that down the line a year from now or two years from now, we may have to engineer kind of new vaccines that better reflect the common strain that's circulating.

[00:09:18]Bill Walsh:  Hmm. That's a sobering comment to think that this will be with us for another two years.

[00:09:25]Steven Johnson:  Bill, let me just make one more point though, is this really underscores the importance of these other measures that we've come to rely on in terms of masking and social distancing and so on. It's really doubly important while we learn about these variants that people don't let down their guard in terms of these other preventive measures.

[00:09:49]Bill Walsh:  And I assume that applies also to people who have gotten the vaccine.

[00:09:53]Steven Johnson:  Well, we're learning more about individuals who have gotten the vaccine. Our current advice is for those individuals to continue to use the same practices that everyone else is to avoid the possibility of exposure and reinfection, which is possible, and again, when we give a vaccine that's 95 percent effective, that still means that 1 out of 20 individuals may not have responded to the vaccine. And right now we don't know who that five percent are.

[00:10:28]Bill Walsh:  Hmm. OK. Thanks for that, Dr. Johnson. Lori Smetanka, I'd like to bring you in here. Why have we seen delays in getting vaccines to residents of nursing homes and assisted-living facilities? These folks are arguably the most vulnerable — 40 percent of the COVID deaths have occurred in those settings. How does it differ from programs available to the public?

[00:10:52]Lori Smetanka:  Well, there have been a number of factors that we think are affecting getting the vaccines to residents of these facilities, including some of the processes being used to distribute the vaccines in each state. The varying numbers of facilities and residents that need to be vaccinated and even things like the need to obtain advanced consent for issuing the vaccine for some of the residents who aren't able to consent themselves. There needs to be outreach to legal representatives or others who were able to give some of that consent. So those are some of the factors that have been affecting this. Many states have entered into partnerships with pharmacies, as you know, to vaccinate residents, and they're relying on clinics or different processes that are being set up by those pharmacies, so they're having to arrange those and have people from the pharmacies go into the facilities to organize those clinics, and then arrange for the vaccines for the residents and the staff. And each facility is scheduling multiple clinics. So it's taking some time there. But we do know that the nursing homes continue to be top priority for vaccine distribution and that it be offered to every resident and staff person who's willing to accept it. And we're hopeful that with some of the new pieces put into place by President Biden over the last week, like for example, increasing production through Defense Production Act, connecting with different entities to assist in distribution, we're hopeful that the necessary doses will be headed to all long-term care facilities as soon as possible.

[00:12:32]Bill Walsh:  Right. OK. Well, let me ask you a very practical question. You know, throughout this process families have struggled to get regular and accurate information from nursing facilities. What questions should family members ask about the vaccine program at their loved one's nursing home, and what recourse do they have if they don't get adequate answers?

[00:12:53]Lori Smetanka:  Yeah, it's important for residents and families to stay as involved and stay as informed as they can. And that the facilities be providing timely and accurate information to them about what's happening, not just related to vaccines, but also with respect to COVID. So, with the vaccines, we are encouraging people to ask a lot of questions of their facility and some things they can ask, for example, are when will the vaccinations be given, what's the process that's been put into place and what's the schedule? And if, for some reason, the resident can't make that time, you know, people go out for doctor's visits, for example, or some people have been hospitalized, will there be alternative days and times that are available for the resident to get vaccinated? How will the nursing home get consent for those people who aren't able to give it themselves? And can that be arranged in advance as far as possible before the clinics that are being set up. Ask about the vaccination rates in the facility, so far, and what happens if a resident chooses not to get vaccinated? Will it be offered at a future time if they change their mind and they can get vaccinated at some point in the future? And also be asking what kind of processes and protections will be in place to protect all residents, recognizing that some residents and staff are declining right now to get the vaccine. So we need to make sure that people are going to be protected. And if they don't get satisfactory answers to the questions, we encourage people to certainly talk to the administration in the facility, but they should also contact their long-term care ombudsman program for help. And they can find an ombudsman who's an advocate for residents in long-term care facilities. They can find one in their area by going to our website at theconsumervoice.org, all one word, and they can get their local ombudsman contact information there.

[00:14:46]Bill Walsh:  Very good. And that's a really important point for our listeners. There are ombudsmen across the country, and they are there to help advocate on your behalf with long-term care facilities. That web address that Lori just provided was theconsumervoice.org. There's also a hotline for the eldercare locator. That number is [800] 677-1116. Again, if you're having challenges with the facilities where your loved ones are, call that number, ask to get engaged with the ombudsman, and they should help you out. OK, well, thank you for that, Lori. Clarence, let's turn to you. You know, we've heard a lot of consumer complaints about not being able to get a vaccine or even how to sign up for one in some cases. What are the challenges that local governments are facing in distributing the vaccine? And what's being done to address them? And what local resources do governments need to help out?

[00:16:03]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, well, thank you again for having me. I think one of the biggest challenges for local governments and most municipal officials is that we're not directly responsible for the distribution in most cities in America because we don't have our own health department. But usually, we work collaboratively with our county officials to get the information out to our residents. And the one thing that we are encouraging our members to do, and they are doing it, they're advocating on their behalf. I mean, Lori talked about ways in which they can get access, and they also, if they don't get the information that they need, where can they go? Well most often the most trusted level of government is the local government and cities, towns and villages throughout America. And what we're deeply concerned that, you know, that responsibility that we have as trusted leaders are at risk because we have not been able to get the money directly into the hands of city leaders, town leaders, to be able to help them get access to the vaccine. My mayors and council members are really concerned at the most at risk who suffer disproportionately from COVID infections, the sickness and the deaths, especially in the Black, indigenous and people of color populations. And many of those have not had access to the vaccine because of a number of reasons. But I can tell you that the health care system and that access and this distrust on a day-to-day basis is causing our residents not to get as connected and get the shot that we know is essential to having a healthy long-term life. There's no question that there's a huge disconnect between supply and demand and a lack of understanding. So what we're trying to do is making sure that we sit down with those health care workers, and that we sit down with the health departments and the state leaders, and we share the concerns of our communities, our residents so that that they can understand those variables, and then they can overcome those. Clearly, I'll tell you that technology gap in access is a big challenge to the first round of aged population in America. So we're on the front line, we're taking it serious, we're showing up and that's the important thing. But we've got to partner with the public health systems in our counties and our states.

[00:19:11]Bill Walsh:  Well thanks for that, Clarence. And as most of our listeners may know, each state is handling its vaccine distribution program a little bit differently. One resource AARP has created to help people understand what's happening where they live is on our website. We've created state-by-state guides. You can check those out at aarp.org/coronavirus. You just pick your state, and you'll get a pretty easy to read summary of the distribution plans at your state and helpful phone numbers, and also questions to ask your health care professionals. So thanks for that, all of our guests. And as a reminder to all of our listeners ... oh, go ahead.

[00:19:59]Clarence Anthony:  I think that's very important to have that kind of information. And I will tell you, there are cities like Dallas who have registration fields, that people are coming in, that they don't have technology and they have language barriers. So city leaders are working with AARP, which AARP is a great partner to have to get the information out.

[00:20:22]Bill Walsh:  OK, well, thank you for that. As a reminder to our listeners, to ask your question, please press *3. And we're going to get to those questions very soon. But before we do, I wanted to bring in AARP's Executive Vice President and Chief Advocacy and Engagement Officer Nancy LeaMond. Welcome Nancy.

[00:20:43]Nancy LeaMond:  Thanks Bill. Thanks for having me.

[00:20:45]Bill Walsh:  Nancy, what is AARP doing to fight for the 50-plus as the vaccines are being rolled out and make sure they know how to get the vaccines in their states?

[00:20:55]Nancy LeaMond:  Well, for months, and it seems like years actually, but for months, AARP has called for action to improve the health and economic security of older Americans and all Americans during the pandemic. As the death toll, hospitalization rates, case numbers and the economic impact of the pandemic continue to rise, it's a critical time for all of us. And while we're seeing tremendous demand for COVID vaccines, we know that many of you are incredibly frustrated that you haven't been able to get the vaccine, or simply get clear information about when you will be able to do so. And when looking for information, [it can’t] just be online. We need 1-800 call centers in every state where you can talk to someone and get your questions answered. This is the most important task facing the new administration. There is no time for delay or roadblocks. AARP is redoubling our efforts to provide people 50-plus with trusted information about vaccines. In fact, as you just mentioned, we just published online guides for every state explaining how to get vaccines where you live, and we'll be updating them as we get more information. We are continuing to fight for older Americans to be prioritized in getting COVID-19 vaccines because the science has clearly shown that older people are at higher risk of death. There have been 420,000 deaths from COVID-19 and 95 percent of those have been people 50-plus. Forty percent of COVID deaths have also been people who live and work in nursing homes, despite being only 1 percent of the population. Now at the federal level, we were pleased to see the Biden administration's focus on vaccine distribution, including protecting long-term care residents and staff who have been devastated by this pandemic. And we are also urging that vaccinations be made available through mobile vaccine centers for those who are caught in their homes. We are also thankful to see proposals for new economic stimulus payments, additional funds for nutrition assistance, paid sick and family leave to keep families healthy and aid to state and local governments who have been so hard hit by this crisis. We urge quick federal action on these policies. AARP has also been very active at the state level. Our state and committed volunteers from 16 AARP state offices are participating in formal work groups led by their governors and state health departments. This includes Idaho, North Carolina, Tennessee, California and many others. And AARP advocates in every single state are urging governors and state legislators to improve information and coordination on the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. Meanwhile, we're advocating to protect programs like aging services, home and community-based care, low-income energy assistance and unemployment and job assistance programs. None of this work, fighting for our nearly 38 million members, would be possible without the dedication and passion of AARP staff and volunteers and grassroots advocates nationwide. And we know many of them are on this call today. To stay up to date on all of these efforts and find summaries of state plans for vaccination distribution, please visit aarp.org/coronavirus. Thanks so much, thanks Bill and thanks to all of our expert panelists.

[00:24:47]Bill Walsh:  OK, thanks so much for that update, Nancy. It's now time to address your questions about the coronavirus with Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka and Clarence Anthony. Now I'd like to bring in my AARP colleague, Jean Setzfand, to help facilitate your calls today. Welcome, Jean.

[00:25:18]Jean Setzfand:  Thanks so much, Bill. I'm delighted to be here for this important conversation.

[00:25:21]Bill Walsh:  All right, who is first on the line?

[00:25:25]Jean Setzfand:  Our first caller is the Celestine from Michigan.

[00:25:28]Bill Walsh:  Hi, Celestine. Welcome to the program. Go ahead with your call.

[00:25:33]Celestine:  I wanted to ask a question. I'm 75 years old, and I've been trying to figure out when will I be able to get that vaccine?

[00:25:45]Bill Walsh:  When you'll be able to get the vaccine.

[00:25:47]Celestine:  Yeah, I stay in Michigan [inaudible].

[00:25:51]Bill Walsh:  OK. Very good. Dr. Johnson, do you want to address that?

[00:25:57]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, happy to address it. Thanks for your question. I'm more familiar with my home state of Colorado. Certainly age 75 fits into one of the priorities for the CDC guidance on who should get immunized, vaccinated. And we're certainly doing that for people age 70 and over. Other states are actually doing it for age 65 and over. So you should certainly qualify for an early vaccine. Part of the question, and Bill maybe AARP has some resources for Michigan, is kind of the method there. So, for example, in Colorado, we have a vaccine hotline that people can call so that they can be matched up with providers that are providing the vaccine. I will mention, just in our health care system here, we have a hundred thousand people over age 70, so even people that are a priority, it may take several weeks. But you certainly need to kind of get on a list for a vaccine. And I don't know if any of our other experts can kind of provide some more local advice for how to handle that in Michigan.

[00:27:12]Bill Walsh:  Clarence, do you have any recommendations for Celestine for local resources she could reach out to?

[00:27:20]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, I was actually going back to your recommendation. First of all, it does include one of the barriers, and that is trying to go back and look at the state website to identify where she can access the vaccine. The other thing is, again it gets back to that technology use, being able to do simple things like asking your kids or a neighbor or a family member to help you to get in line to get the vaccine, because most often you have to register to get an appointment, which again, can be a barrier to some. And I think the other thing is to access some of the county health department information and see if they can help you by getting you registered. What Celestine is raising up is clearly a coordination and information issue because there's no question that she should be in that first level of priority. So I'm hopeful that she has that support system around her.

[00:28:33]Bill Walsh:  Right [inaudible] ... go ahead. I'm sorry.

[00:28:36]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, Bill, I was just going to say another resource would be your local physician. I certainly provide that role to all of my patients who call me, and I can direct them to how they can access, get on the list and so on. And so, for example, the vaccine hotline. So if Celestine has a primary care physician, I imagine that would be a source of advice.

[00:29:00]Bill Walsh:  That's a very good suggestion. And while we've been talking, our excellent staff here at AARP has pulled up the guidelines for Michigan. And I've got a couple of tips for you, Celestine. You can call the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. They have a toll-free number to find out if you're eligible and how to book an appointment. That number is [888] 535-6136. Or you can send them an email at COVID-19@michigan.gov. We also see here that in Michigan, folks 65 and older are eligible to be vaccinated first. And so that's sounds like good news for you Celestine. So, Jean who is our next caller?

[00:29:57]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Miriam from Pennsylvania.

[00:30:00]Bill Walsh:  Hey, Miriam, go ahead with your question.

[00:30:05]Miriam:  Now that I'm listening to all of this information, I'm kind of eerie about wanting to go into a home. We're both elderly, my husband and I, we're in our 90s, and we gotta get out of our home and get into a health home. So the question is, how am I supposed to get into a home, a senior home, if all of this is taking place?

[00:30:41]Bill Walsh:  That's a terrific question. Lori, can you address that for Miriam and others who might be interested?

[00:30:46]Lori Smetanka:  Sure, I know that that's been a big concern for people throughout this pandemic, thinking about if you need some additional assistance or are looking to move into either an assisted-living or a senior residence where you can get some additional services. And I think that you need to be asking questions before you go into a facility that could help you determine, number one, if you could maybe get some services in your own home. So maybe your local area agency on aging can work with you on helping to assess if you can actually get people to come into your own home and provide some additional supports for you. But if you do think that you're thinking about moving into another residence where you can get some additional services, ask them questions about how they're handling the COVID crisis. Ask them what protections they're putting into place for their residents there and how they're making sure that they and the staff are being protected. Do they have enough people on hand to provide services? Do they have enough protective equipment and masks for everyone, for example, and what are the vaccination rates that are there so that you know whether or not other residents and staff are being vaccinated. And also ask about any outbreaks related to COVID. You may find that some of the places that you're looking at have not had outbreaks, and you might be more likely to direct your attention to those than others. But asking questions, I think, is a really good idea.

[00:32:29]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you very much for that, Lori. And thanks Miriam for that question. Jean, who is our next caller?

[00:32:35]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Karen from Wisconsin.

[00:32:38]Bill Walsh:  Hey Karen, go ahead with your question.

[00:32:41]Karen:  Yes. My question is in regarding to the vaccine itself. If someone in your household has received the vaccine, is it possible for them in the few days after they've received it to transmit the virus to others in the household?

[00:32:59]Bill Walsh:  Interesting question. Dr. Johnson, can you answer that question from Karen?

[00:33:03]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, that's an excellent question. All of the vaccines, the two vaccines that are available, and really, the other three or four vaccines that are in advanced states of development; none of them are live vaccines. So there is no risk of somebody who's getting the vaccine transmitting the virus to others. However, there is a question about whether the vaccine fully protects against infection or whether it prevents more from people getting ill. So one of the unanswered questions is if somebody gets a vaccine, and then a month from now is exposed to COVID-19, could they still acquire maybe a milder infection and then transmit it. But in terms of the immediate aftermath of vaccine, there is no risk of anything in the vaccine being transmitted to others.

[00:33:59]Bill Walsh:  I suppose though it speaks to the point you were making earlier about the need for continued social distancing and mask-wearing, even once you've taken the vaccine.

[00:34:10]Steven Johnson:  Yes. I think that's the primary advice. There is kind of a recent communication from the CDC about health care workers, not necessarily needing to quarantine a full two weeks if they've gotten the vaccine. That's one bit of information that's a little bit different. But I think until we know more, we would like the measures that everyone has taken to prevent acquisition of COVID-19 so far to continue exactly in the same way after their vaccines until we know more.

[00:34:48]Bill Walsh:  And I know the science is still a bit light on this, Dr. Johnson, but do we have a sense of how much protection that first dose gives you? Obviously, the FDA is recommending people get two doses of these first two vaccines. How much protection do people have if they've just gotten the one?

[00:35:08]Steven Johnson:  So, we do think that one dose provide some protection and in the initial studies of the Pfizer vaccine, individuals who were 10 days out from their first dose, seemed to be at low risk for developing an infection. But we don't know the degree to which that first dose protects and also how long it protects. Oftentimes a booster dose is meant to not only strengthen the immune system, but lead to a longer period of time of protection. And if you follow the news, the country of Israel has been very aggressive in rolling out vaccine. And they've actually reported that they think some of their individuals who have gotten one dose of the vaccine have acquired COVID-19 in-between the two doses. And so I would want people to kind of view that first dose as important, but also view the second dose as essential.

[00:36:09]Bill Walsh:  Very good. Well, thanks for that. And Miriam, I don't know if you are still on the line, but I wanted to call out a resource for you and others who had questions about COVID and nursing homes and assisted-living facilities. AARP has created an online resource so you can see details of every facility, or at least most of them around the country. And that's aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. A little snapshot of each of the facilities around the country, or at least those that are reporting data. And it might give you a high-level sense of infection rates in various facilities and precautions that they are taking. OK, Jean. Let's go back to the phones. Who is our next caller?

[00:37:04]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Dorothy from Massachusetts.

[00:37:06]Bill Walsh:  Hey, Dorothy, welcome to the program.

[00:37:10]Dorothy:  Yes.

[00:37:12]Bill Walsh:  Go ahead with your question.

[00:37:12]Dorothy:  My question is, is there are many of us that do not have a computer, I'm a senior, I'm 87, my husband's 90. And we are both handicapped, and nobody has even discussed what to do about the people that cannot leave their homes. There's many of us that still live at home and there's been no consideration about sending someone to take care of us because we're unable to go and sit for two or three hours. We barely can stand. And that's the big problem for I think the seniors, and there's been no question about it. Thank you.

[00:37:47]Bill Walsh:  Let me ask you, Dorothy. Have you gotten any outreach about the vaccine? Have you signed up on any list yet?

[00:37:54]Dorothy:  No, we can't. No, I have not.

[00:37:56]Bill Walsh:  OK.

[00:37:56]Dorothy:  We couldn't even get out and be tested because the lines were too long, three or four hours in the car was just impossible.

[00:38:03]Bill Walsh:  Right. No, I hear you. Clarence, can you address that question from Dorothy? I think it's a question a lot of people have.

[00:38:10]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah. I agree with Dorothy. That is one of the barriers that we are seeing with the health department's websites, the access to technology. I do think the important thing is to pick up the phone and call your local health department and to make sure that they know that you qualify, and that they have programs where they would actually help you get the vaccine, or put you in line to be able to get it. I think, you know, cities like New York City and that's not a common-size city in a way, but they have a "Vaccine for All" transportation program, which assists people 65 and older to be able to get them to the vaccine sites and get them not to have to wait, but to move them right through the program site. The city of Tallahassee, Florida, provides buses to and from the vaccine sites. And those kinds of things are really helpful. But I do think there are special cases that we are going to have to look at, and that is those that are not able to stand in line. They're not able to go out there for two hours. And a lot of the health departments and states are starting to look at those programs. But right now, I think that that's the biggest barrier that we're seeing nationally.

[00:39:52]Bill Walsh:  Right, OK, thank you for that, Clarence. And Dorothy I wanted to, while Clarence was talking, our excellent AARP staff was looking up some information on Massachusetts and found out a couple of things. The first thing is that starting February 1, people 75 and older in Massachusetts will be able to make an appointment to get the vaccine. We also have a number for you to call there. It's the Massachusetts Health Department. That number is [617] 624-6000. They should be able to give you information on where to go and how to sign up for the vaccine in Massachusetts. OK, Jean. Who is our next caller?

[00:40:40]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Eileen from California.

[00:40:43]Bill Walsh:  Hi, Eileen. Welcome to the program. Go ahead with your question. Eileen, are you with us?

[00:40:52]Eileen:  Hi, I'm 95, and I have like a 17 different medicines that I'm allergic to, and I was wondering if I should get that shot or not.

[00:41:07]Bill Walsh:  That's a very good question. Dr. Johnson, can you address that for Eileen and others who have allergies to medicines?

[00:41:16]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, thank you for your question. And that actually has been well studied so far. Fortunately, with both the Pfizer and the Moderna vaccine, the risk of an allergic reaction is very low. In saying that, there have been some allergic reactions, and one of the risks for an allergic reaction is individuals that have a history of a number of allergies. But the only real contraindication to the vaccine is if you are allergic to components of the vaccine. And the vaccine, in addition to the genetic material of the virus, the messenger RNA, there are some fats that we call lipids, and there's a few other chemicals, and so on. We have been routinely vaccinating individuals at our center that have a history of allergies, and the only kind of, I think, additional precaution is that individuals with allergies are monitored in the clinic a bit longer. Most individuals, once they've got the vaccine are allowed to leave after 15 minutes, but the recommendation is for people that have multiple allergies, that they wait for 30 minutes. An allergic reaction is something we can handle, and I still feel the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccine far outweigh the risks.

[00:42:47]Bill Walsh:  So, for Eileen, would you recommend that she sign up to get the vaccine and tell whoever's giving her the shot, ‘Hey, I'm allergic to these 17 medicines’ to kind of put them on notice so they can watch her?

[00:43:02]Steven Johnson:  I think that's a great idea. And I actually think that would happen anyways. When you come for your vaccine, one of the routine parts of counseling is looking at your list of allergies. And if there's anything on that allergy list that raises a concern, that should be detected by the health care personnel. But I think you can help by making sure that your list of allergies is complete and to let the health care provider administering the vaccine know about those allergies.

[00:43:33]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you for that, Dr. Johnson. Jean, let's take another call.

[00:43:37]Jean Setzfand:  Sounds good. We've gotten a lot of calls, but we also have a lot of YouTube questions that I've been putting off. So let me go there. So Linda from YouTube is asking a similar question, "I've heard one should not take anti-inflammatory medicines, like aspirin, Advil, Motrin prior to taking the vaccine. Can you clarify? And if so, how soon after taking the vaccine, can you take those meds?"

[00:44:01]Bill Walsh:  Dr. Johnson?

[00:44:01]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, thank you for that question. I want to make sure that we answer this correctly. There was, this is a teeny bit off topic, but there was concern at one point that anti-inflammatory agents might have an adverse outcome in individuals when they develop COVID-19, and that's really been disproven. In terms of anti-inflammatory agents around the vaccine, you know, if it's not necessary to take those additional medications, I think it's reasonable to not take them. The anti-inflammatory medications that we'd be most concerned about would be steroid type of medications, because steroids can weaken your immune system and consequently then can lessen your response to the vaccine. So those might be medications like prednisone or hydrocortisone, other steroids, and so on. The other issue that comes up is can you use anti-inflammatories or pain medications after the vaccine, just because there are some side effects that can occur including arm pain and fever and so on. You know, my advice is for people not to be miserable, but in general, I advise people to use a medication like Acetaminophen or something like that, to deal with vaccine related side effects. But the major anti-inflammatory issue prior to the vaccine would be steroid medications.

[00:45:37]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you for that. Jean, let's take another question.

[00:45:42]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Frank from Pennsylvania.

[00:45:46]Bill Walsh:  Hey Frank, go ahead with your question.

[00:45:48]Frank:  My mom is 90-some years old. I know they're going to be going into the nursing homes to give the senior citizens the vaccines. If she refuses to take the vaccine, and I have power of attorney, can I override that and force them to take the vaccine? And what happens if after the fact, they go in, and how do we go about getting the vaccine to her? By after the fact, I'm saying they go in, and give the patients the vaccine, and she hasn't got that. How do we go about taking care of that?

[00:46:28]Bill Walsh:  OK, Frank. Lori, do you want to tackle that question?

[00:46:32]Lori Smetanka:  Sure. So I think if there's concern from your mother about the vaccine, I think we should try to get her information about the safety of it, and why it's a good idea for her to take it. If she's competent and able to make her own decisions, then certainly she should be able to do that. And we know that for many people, if they are hesitant to take the vaccine, oftentimes doing some education has been the factor to encourage them to reconsider and actually to take that. So, if you are concerned about her willingness to take it, I would have some good conversation with her and ask the staff to talk with her, or her doctor to talk with her, about why it's important that she take it. For people who may refuse the first time that the clinics are being held, or the pharmacies, or whatever the process is in the nursing home, there should be opportunities at later dates for people to get the vaccine. And that's something that we would encourage you to talk to the facility administration about, on how they're going to ensure that people who maybe later on change their mind, or want to take the vaccine, or even for new people coming in, that they will take it. So, have some conversation with your mother, talk to the administrator and her doctor about what the processes can be and how to make sure that she can get it if she needs it.

[00:48:08]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you for that, Lori. And thanks for all those great questions. We're going to take more of your questions soon. I'd like to turn to our experts. Clarence, you've heard in a lot of the calls we've gotten so far, people are having trouble figuring out where to start to sign up for the vaccine. What's your advice? What's the first point of contact people should be thinking about in their communities if they want to reach out and find out about how to get the vaccine. And let's assume they may not have internet access.

[00:48:50]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, I think that's a challenge that we are seeing right now all over America. My first point of recommendation and Dr. Johnson sort of shared that as well, I like the idea of talking to your physician or your doctor to see if they have information or they can, while you're there, access where you can find that information. I'll go back again to say that your city hall, your county health department is a place that they are there to direct you and provide that information to you. What we are seeing in terms of our mayors and council members all over America, is that they're partnering with their neighborhood groups, their associate, you know, their nonprofits. The YMCA has a great program and, of course, AARP has a great program to educate all the communities. The one community, again, that is still, it's lopsided for me, is that the greater need are some of the poorest and people of color communities, but the vaccine sites are not there. We have got to focus, and we have got to manage that type of access because people of color are contracting it three and four times higher, as well as, dying, because they don't have access. So our mayors and council members, city leaders, are partnering with everybody to try to get information there.

[00:50:41]Bill Walsh:  Well that's a very interesting point. I was going to touch on that next. How much are you seeing in terms of outreach to those communities around the country, and are we seeing much resistance to taking the vaccines? I know in some communities of color, there's some historical reluctance to trust the medical establishment.

[00:51:04]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, well, the National League of Cities is working on an initiative with the CEO of AARP, Ms. Jenkins, that we are going out, and we're starting to talk about education about the vaccine. Now we're not talking about you should or should not, because I do think those historical experiences that Black Americans have had with so many things, not just historical, but even looking at today, that we're shining a light on the inequities. And there is a lack of trust there at this time. So what our goal here is just to tell the vaccine facts and to share if you have certain health issues, this may not impact you. You still should get the vaccine as Dr. Johnson has indicated. So, I think that that's the first step, but we also must recognize the transportation limitations. And again, when we're talking about 65 and older population, there is a lot of education that we must do. And I think it's going to take all of us, the medical community and every part of our community to get people to trust that this vaccine is safe, and that if you want to live a quality life, that it's important that you get it.

[00:52:41]Bill Walsh:  Yeah. Well, thanks for that, Clarence. And as you referenced, AARP is doing what it can to get the facts out about the vaccine. If you want to find out how to get the vaccine near where you live, check out aarp.org/coronavirus. We have a tool there where you can just choose your state and see what your local state guidelines are. If you don't have access to the internet, I think Clarence provides some really good advice there. Call your doctor. That's a great first step. Call your local or state health department. Or call your local elected officials. That's why we elect them to help serve us and make sure in times of crisis; we get the answers that we all need. Let me turn to you again, Dr. Johnson. As Clarence referenced, COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on adults, older adults and people of color. What's being done to protect those most at risk in the pandemic? Are they being prioritized in the vaccine distribution?

[00:53:49]Steven Johnson:  Well, let me start with age. I think individuals above a certain age have been a really great priority. You know, health care workers were part of the initial phase. Nursing home residents and staff, but really, right after that has been individuals above a certain age. As I alluded to, different states are using different age cutoffs. In Colorado, we're using age 70 right now. What we've learned is that this group over 70 is really a very large group. So even though you prioritize individuals, it may take weeks with the current vaccine infrastructure and supply to get this population fully vaccinated. So that's been a big priority. I think it's a harder set of issues regarding people of color. And I would like my kind of colleagues to weigh in on this as well, because I think this is a multifactorial issue. On one hand, certain people of color may be at greater risk for being exposed to COVID-19, based on living conditions, based on work circumstances and so on. But that's a group that also may have less access to medical care, and may have some issues of trust, may have more vaccine hesitancy. So, I think we've seen lower rates of vaccination. I do know that our state and local governments in Colorado are recognizing this as an issue, that is, despite having guidelines based on age, certain people of color are not getting vaccinated as rapidly as others.

[00:55:34]Bill Walsh:  Hmm. OK. Let me ask you a quick follow-up to that. We've all been hearing so much about the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines that are being distributed now. What do we know about the other ones coming down the pike, like the AstraZeneca and the Johnson & Johnson candidates? Are they going to help ensure enough supply? And what do we know about their effectiveness?

[00:55:59]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, so, the remarkable thing about the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccines is, not only are they very effective, but the results are very similar, and they're so similar that we feel comfortable recommending to individuals that if they're offered one or the other, they should take either one because the effectiveness rate is roughly 95 percent. The side effect potential is similar and so on. It gets a bit different when we talk about other vaccines. We already know quite a bit about the AstraZeneca vaccine, which is not a live vaccine, but it's a different technology than the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. And there are more mixed results in terms of its effectiveness. There are certain subgroups that have a higher rate of success than others, and so it isn't quite as clean as the data with the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccine. As some of you may know, the AstraZeneca vaccine is being used in other countries, including the United Kingdom. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a very similar technology to the AstraZeneca vaccine. Again, it's not a live vaccine. The exciting thing about that vaccine is it's a single dose. And if that's successful, of course, that will be much more efficient than a two-dose series. We really expect to hear those results at any time. I think I joked to Bill that we might hear during the hour here. It's amazing how fast results come out with COVID-19. But we should hear about that soon. And once we know the results, we'll kind of know the impact that will have on the supply chain. One other vaccine that we're part of here at the University of Colorado is the Novavax vaccine, which is yet a different technology. So I'm encouraged by the number of vaccine candidates and hopefully these subsequent candidates will be as successful as the two vaccines we're currently using.

[00:58:08]Bill Walsh:  We sure hope so, and if a one of those vaccines gets approval or we see some data on that during the call, we will announce it here to our listeners live. Listen, for our listeners, I want to mention something. We're seeing a couple inquiries from folks saying, I'm waiting for my doctor to call me about the vaccine. This is not a time to wait for your doctor to call you. This is a time to advocate for yourself. Don't wait for the phone to ring. You need to be reaching out to get in line. If you're a caregiver, reach out on behalf of your loved ones. This is a time to advocate for yourself and for your loved ones because we know that these local governments are struggling with outreach and information. So take it upon yourself to get the information that you need.

[00:58:57] OK, Lori, I wanted to ask you about nursing homes and assisted-living facilities. We've heard enormous frustration from our membership about not being able to see their loved ones, to be in contact with them. At what point do you think those facilities may begin easing restrictions that they've put in place? And do you think that some of those precautions are going to be permanent?

[00:59:21]Lori Smetanka:  Yeah, these are really great questions and ones that we hear a lot from our members as well, and questions we've been raising ourselves. We are still trying to get complete answers to this question from the government agencies that have put the visitation restrictions in place and have been talking with the federal agency that oversees nursing homes, the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, and they've indicated that they're going to be reviewing the visitation guidance and possibly reviewing it now that the vaccines are being distributed. But we don't know when or what that's going to look like. So we are continuing to advocate with the federal government, with the legislators, and are working with partners like AARP to establish safe visitation and facilities as soon as possible, because we do know that residents and families are extremely frustrated by the ongoing ban. They want to be reunited with their loved ones. And we also know that families provide a lot of support and care for their resident family members living in long-term care facilities, because too many facilities don't have enough staff available on a daily basis to provide care. So that's been a really big factor. But in the meantime, right now, long-term care facilities should be doing whatever they can to ensure proper infection control practices are in place, that they're continuing to continually assessing how they can offer safe visits, even right now, between residents and families, and they need to be working to meet the needs of each resident. Many families are qualifying for essential caregiving visits or compassionate care visits, and the goal is to get as many family members back in as soon as possible and to get the restrictions lifted as soon as possible.

[01:01:08]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you for that, Lori. And again, listeners, don't be shy about reaching out to the nursing homes and assisted-living facilities where your loved ones reside and asking them the tough questions. I want to repeat a terrific resource AARP created about what's happening inside of nursing homes. That's aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Go there to find out information about infection rates in nursing homes where your loved ones reside, precautions that are being taken. But by all means, if you have questions, pick up the phone and call them and advocate for your loved ones. Thank you so much, Lori, for that, and thanks to all our guests. We're going to get to more listener questions shortly, but I wanted to give a quick AARP Fraud Watch Alert Update. As the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine continues, scammers are looking for ways to take advantage. They are calling, sending emails and texts and placing fake ads to convince people they can jump to the front of the vaccine lines for a fee or by providing their Social Security number or other sensitive personal information. Know that any offer to skip the vaccine line is a scam. Always turn to trusted resource resources, such as your doctor or local health department for guidance regarding distribution of the vaccine. Visit aarp.org/fraudwatchnetwork to learn more about these and other scams, or you can call our Fraud Watch Network Helpline at 877-908-3360. Now it's time to address more of your questions with Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka and Clarence Anthony. Jean, who do we have on the line right now?

[01:03:19]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Paul from Pennsylvania.

[01:03:23]Bill Walsh:  Hey Paul, go ahead with your question.

[01:03:25]Paul:  Why thank you. Yes, and thank you for taking my call. I'm 71 years old. I have not yet been vaccinated, but I'm certainly looking forward to it. And I was wondering that after vaccination will I still need to wear a mask, and will I still need to avoid gatherings like family gatherings, even if all the attendees have been vaccinated or have had COVID?

[01:03:48]Bill Walsh:  OK. Dr. Johnson, I think we've touched on this before. Could you reiterate your guidance for Paul and for others who are wondering about that?

[01:03:58]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, thank you for your question, Paul. We don't know precisely who the subset are that don't get protected with the vaccine, number one. Number two, we're not sure how long the protection lasts, and number three, we're not sure whether the vaccine prevents disease and still allowing infection. So I think the advice that I would recommend, I actually heard Dr. Fauci last night on the TV talking about it, is that the availability of the vaccine and getting the vaccine at the current time should not alter the other preventive measures that you are taking. So I would not loosen up any of the strategies that you've used so far to avoid COVID-19. Now six months from now, or 12 months from now, when we know quite a bit more about the vaccine effects and know the state of the pandemic, we might have different advice, but we certainly want to err on the side of caution that people use the same measures.

[01:05:12]Bill Walsh:  OK, and Clarence from the National League of Cities, I wonder if you're seeing examples of mayors around the country who are setting that example of social distancing and mask-wearing to folks who live in their jurisdictions.

[01:05:31]Clarence Anthony:  [inaudible] campaign, if you will, for the last 10, 11 months. And there is this recognition that's important to have your mask and practice social distance and washing your hands. And I think that some have been caught not doing that, having family gatherings and going out to dinner. And what has been positive is that the feedback from the community is that you're saying that we should do that, but you're not. So I think that local leaders are saying, we're not traveling because we've asked you not to travel. We've asked you to wear your mask. And I think that that has been a positive behavior change and modeling that with their residents. You know, one of the things I want to also mention in here as the callers listen, our rural communities, those that are 20,000 smaller communities, is an area that I think we are very concerned about making sure that information and vaccine distribution gets to those cities. And I would venture to say that many of the callers, you're from those areas, and I would encourage you to go to your health department, call your doctor, be an advocate for yourself because sometimes we think about the Washington, D.C.’s, the Chicago’s, and other major cities. But I think that one of the things that I want to lift up is that we know that you're there in the smaller rural cities, and AARP, National League of Cities and others, we want to work with you to get you this information. So, I want to just make that point as well.

[01:07:33]Bill Walsh:  All right, thank you for that, Clarence. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:07:35]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Anne from Ohio.

[01:07:35]Bill Walsh:  Hey Anne, go ahead with your question.

[01:07:35]Anne:  Hello. While I was listening, you addressed my question regarding the nursing homes and how soon we would be able to get back in there. So I'm going to bow out, and let someone else take the next question.

[01:07:36]Bill Walsh:  OK, all right. Thanks very much for that. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:07:39]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller, I'm actually going to pull one from YouTube. And we have a question from Uda, I'm sorry if I'm pronouncing that incorrectly, but Uda's asking, "How long does the vaccine last?"

[01:08:20]Bill Walsh:  Dr. Johnson, do you have any insight on that? I'm not sure we have the data to tell us that.

[01:08:25]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, I think maybe a three-word answer, I don't know, would suffice. These vaccine trials, these Phase 3 vaccine trials were started in July of 2020, so we're just about six months into it. And individuals who have been part of these vaccine trials, many of them are continuing on the trials for up to two years or more. And so that's one of the issues that we need to learn about. How long is protection? Will a booster be necessary? If a booster is necessary, what is the timing? So I think we'll learn more about that, but we don't know right now. I mean I think the conventional wisdom is that there would be months of protection, but how that would translate into years, we'll just have to figure it out when we get there.

[01:09:20]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you very much. Jean, who is next on the line?

[01:09:24]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Jill from New Jersey.

[01:09:28]Bill Walsh:  Hey, Jill, welcome to the program, and go ahead with your question.

[01:09:33]Jill:  Hi, well most of my question was answered, but I'm worried about my uncle who is 82 years old. He has an appointment for April 5 that he made in the beginning of January. So as the supply increases, will they be, the elderly who are not in nursing homes or assisted-living or whatever, will the other people be moved up in the queue, I would assume.

[01:10:23]Bill Walsh:  In priority. Yeah. So, your uncle was not in a facility at this point.

[01:10:28]Jill:  No, but he has a lot of medical issues, and I'm just worried about him.

[01:10:37]Bill Walsh:  Sure, no, I understand. Dr. Johnson, I wonder if you can talk a little bit about prioritization. Her uncle is 82. I'm a little surprised to hear that he's going to have to wait until April 5 to get an appointment.

[01:10:50]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, I alluded to the fact that even when you use an age cutoff, there still are many people above that age, and of course, we're viewing this as a universal vaccine. You know, we want to get the whole world vaccinated essentially. So in our situation here in Colorado, it's going to take a number of weeks to actually get individuals over 70 vaccinated. In saying that, April does seem farther out than I would have predicted. I'm certainly hoping that here in Colorado we get the over 70 individuals immunized sooner. I think, hopefully by the end of February. So I think it's worth maybe talking with his physician and kind of find out what the story is there. In terms of the other part of the question, certainly if there are successes in ramping up production of the current vaccines, if there is the authorization of either the AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson vaccine, the supply increases, and we improve kind of the logistics of administering the vaccines, I would presume that people within a certain priority would get sooner vaccine appointments. That would be the ethical approach.

[01:12:20]Bill Walsh:  Right, and while Dr. Johnson was talking, Jill, our staff pulled up some information on New Jersey, and in New Jersey people 65 and older are eligible for the vaccine. One thing you might do is check out the COVID-19 vaccine page in New Jersey or call this toll-free number. It is 855-568-0545, and that's just for New Jersey, but maybe they can give you some information about how to get your uncle in sooner. He certainly seems to be eligible. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:13:06]Jean Setzfand:  We have another question coming in from Facebook. And I think this alludes to what Clarence talked about earlier about rural communities. [inaudible] is saying, "One problem I'm encountering is that aged individuals, people have to travel far, long distances to wait a long time to get a vaccine. Is there anything that can be done to fix this?"

[01:13:27]Bill Walsh:  Clarence, do you want to address that? I mean, this is a huge issue, I think, particularly in rural areas, but not just in urban areas, in rural areas. Getting on a vaccine list is one thing. Getting to the vaccine is quite another for people.

[01:13:43]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, I think that's right. And a lot of my answers may sound, as if they're scientific or professional, but it's just my feeling that we got to think about this logically. And one of the things I'm seeing is that the drug stores and the grocery stores that are being used, oftentimes we deal with rural communities that don't have those drugstores, don't have that named, high quality, drugstore. And so what we have to do is not create outcomes or create plans that don't accommodate the real people in the rural parts or in the neighborhoods that are food deserts, that don't have those kinds of facilities, even in urban communities. So what we're working with our mayors to do is to work with the health department and to advocate at the state level to put vaccine sites in those churches perhaps, if we can package them and refrigerate them, of course, appropriately, community centers, and if they have a grocery store. It doesn't have to be a Harris Teeter, or in Florida where I'm from, a Publix. It could be another unnamed grocery store. We just have to think about the people in our strategies. And I think our mayors and council members are advocating on behalf of their residents, and they're listening. And so that's what I think we need to do is to create real plans that are affective, because right now we have a shortage, and when you have a shortage, I don't think you're going to really think about those that are in those kinds of rural communities. And we must.

[01:15:51]Bill Walsh:  And I love your suggestion about churches, community centers, grocery stores, as being spots where vaccines can be administered. What about mobile clinics? Are you hearing much about those? I mean, that seems like one way to reach folks in rural areas.

[01:16:07]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, we have heard, that not only mobile clinics, but mobile libraries, because again, some of those communities don't have those in their area. And we've been advocating for those as well. And I'm hoping that we will be able to get it to them. Again, I think, there are states, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and others, Florida, that's having a shortage, and we've just got to figure out a way to get it to those that are more challenged because I think right now, that's what we're concerned about.

[01:16:47]Bill Walsh:  Sure. OK, thank you for that Clarence. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:16:53]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Grace from New York.

[01:16:56]Bill Walsh:  Hey Grace, welcome to the program. Go ahead with your question.

[01:16:59]Grace:  Thank you. My question is, I was sick with apparently the virus in April, and at that time they were telling people to stay at home if you had a fever, which I did. I had a fever for about a week or so. I was sick. I ended up staying home for the whole month. So at the time I didn't get the PCR test. After that, I had the PCR test in May, and it was negative. In June, I had the serology test, and that was positive saying that I was exposed. I've been tested with the PCR test a couple of times since then because of prerequisites for some medical tests — all negative. And I was tested for the antibody on Saturday, Jan. 23, and it says that I'm still positive for antibodies. And so, I think that's the result that we want to get from the vaccine. Does anyone have any knowledge that's through a doctor, and I will contact my doctors, but does anyone know about if somebody is positive for the antibodies should they get the vaccine?

[01:18:32]Bill Walsh:  OK. Dr. Johnson, can you handle that question?

[01:18:36]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, that's a great question. First of all, I think the test results that you have told me, indicate that you probably did have COVID-19. And it seems likely that that illness that you had was related, of course you can't be for sure. Certainly individuals who have blood test evidence of prior COVID-19 are candidates for the vaccine, and, in fact, of some of those individuals were actually included in the vaccine trials. And even individuals who had blood tests that were positive for COVID-19 had enhanced protection by getting the vaccine. So one of the concerns is that COVID-19, the infection itself, doesn't necessarily prevent against reinfection. We do think from studies of health care workers and so on that there probably is some protection after infection that lasts several months or so, but the CDC has revised its guidelines and really says that individuals who developed COVID-19, as long as their symptoms have resolved and they're out of the quarantine period, they should be candidates for the vaccine. There is only one kind of precaution and that is, if, as part of your treatment, you received these antibody therapies that we call either monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, then it's recommended that you wait 90 days because the concern is those antibodies may interfere with the vaccine performance. But based on what you've told me, I would sign up for the vaccine, and I would get the vaccine as soon as it's available for you.

[01:20:25]Bill Walsh:  OK, Dr. Johnson. Thanks for that answer. And Grace, thanks for that call. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:20:41]Jean Setzfand:  Our next caller is Arvin from New Jersey.

[01:20:44]Bill Walsh:  Hey, Arvin, go ahead with your question.

[01:20:48]Arvin:  My question is like the people who get the first vaccine, and they cannot get the second vaccine because it's not available, and do they have to go back to that first vaccine again to get a second?

[01:21:02]Bill Walsh:  That's an interesting question. Dr. Johnson, can you address that? I wonder if this is becoming a common occurrence around the country. People have gotten the first vaccine, but because of shortages or whatever, they haven't gotten the second one. I guess there are two questions here — one is at what point should you go back and get, I guess, a first dose again? And second, do you have to get the same vaccine or can you get a different one?

[01:21:29]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, this has been a developing story. You know, the Centers for Disease Control has a committee called the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and that really is the kind of national body that provides vaccine recommendations. And certainly early on there were recommendations that you should not interchange the vaccines, and you should get the vaccines at the exact intervals that are recommended, which is three weeks apart for the Pfizer vaccine and four weeks apart for the Moderna vaccine. There has been a little bit of loosening up in the latest guidance from this vaccine body that the second dose can be given as late as six weeks after the first dose, and that if the second dose from the one manufacturer is not available, that you can give the second dose from the other manufacturer. So, there is a little more flexibility. I think it's really important in terms of our nationwide vaccine distribution to kind of minimize these types of situations. But those are a couple accommodations that the vaccine recommendations have listed so that people can get that second dose and get that protection.

[01:22:49]Bill Walsh:  Now if you're outside that six-week window, to Arvin's question, what should you do? I mean, should you look at it as if that initial dose is no longer valid and get back in line to get a first dose?

[01:23:08]Steven Johnson:  Well, that's a question that I don't know the answer to because I don't think that there is really, in the current kind of vaccine triage that we're in, I think that the likelihood of kind of getting three doses of vaccine in the foreseeable future seems unlikely. So I think we're probably going to have some situations where somebody actually gets a second dose of vaccine outside of the window that we recommend. And I think the CDC acknowledges that. So I do think a second dose at any time is probably going to be acknowledged as a second dose. As kind of a related phenomenon, we need to kind of learn about how we know that people are actually protected. Are there blood tests that we can do? So, especially for individuals who get the vaccine in an unorthodox schedule, or individuals whose immune system is weakened, how we can kind of determine that they've developed an adequate response to the vaccines. But I suspect this guidance is going to evolve further as more and more people get involved in this type of situation.

[01:24:15]Bill Walsh:  OK, Dr. Johnson. Thanks so much for that. Jean, who is our next caller?

[01:24:20]Jean Setzfand:  We have another question coming in from Facebook, from Nanae, and she's asking, "There's so many rumors about what's in the vaccine and it causing death. How can I be sure that I'm not in danger of this?"

[01:24:34]Bill Walsh:  Dr. Johnson, what about misinformation out there about what's in the vaccine and what harm it could cause?

[01:24:41]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, I think some of the concern is the fact that the two vaccines that are available are a relatively new technology, this messenger RNA, which is a new type of vaccine. But really these vaccines have been under study for many years. And the safety profile looks great at this point. And it's actually unusual in the history of vaccines for there to be some side effect of a vaccine that's not discovered until years later. And if you think about the fact that hundreds of thousands and now millions of individuals have received the vaccine, every day we're getting another million days of exposure and so on. So, I'm comfortable as a health care provider. I got the vaccine and had no hesitation and so on. And, of course, when we do anything in medicine, we always look at the benefits of doing something versus the risks of not doing something. And the risk of not getting the vaccine and then developing COVID-19 is really a great concern.

[01:25:54]Bill Walsh:  Lori, I wonder if you could weigh in, in this as well. I mean, maybe from the family caregiver point of view, if you're hearing different information or claims about the vaccines, are there good sources you would point people to get the facts?

[01:26:11]Lori Smetanka:  We've been directing people to the CDC, for sure, for the most up-to-date information about the vaccines. And they have been updating and revising their guidance on a regular basis. And I think that they have a good set of resources for not only professionals, but also for family members, for consumers, and for the average person who may need good information about the vaccine and questions that may be relating to it. So, we have been encouraging people to go to the CDC website at cdc.gov.

[01:26:53]Bill Walsh:  OK. And Clarence, what about at the local level? What is the, you talked about this a little bit earlier, but can you reiterate the best sources of information about both COVID and the vaccines at the local level?

[01:27:07]Clarence Anthony:  Yeah, I'm going to second, Dr. Johnson's recommendation on the first, and that is, go to your doctor if you have access to a doctor, your county health department, and then your city hall, your mayors and your leaders on the local level, they really do have a lot of information, and using different techniques to try to get you that information and to get you access. And this is so important that you, again, advocate on behalf of yourself here because if you are qualified to get the vaccine, you should be able to get access to that vaccine because this is about your health and this is about your life and your quality of life. So we want to be helpful. So reach out to your local leaders.

[01:28:03]Bill Walsh:  Thank you so much for that, Clarence, and all of our ... oh, go ahead, Dr. Johnson.

[01:28:09]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, I was reading the CDC guidance, and there is a mention that if individuals get a second dose beyond six weeks after the first dose, there was no need to restart the series. So the advice is that get that second dose, and unfortunately, if it's delayed beyond some certain point, it's still counted as a second dose. So there's no restarting the vaccine at this time.

[01:28:34]Bill Walsh:  OK, thanks that clarification. And thank you to all of our guests. We're near the bottom of the hour, and I wanted to ask each of our three experts for any closing thoughts or recommendations that our listeners should take away from our discussion today. Dr. Johnson, would you like to go first?

[01:28:56]Steven Johnson:  Yeah, I would just say trust the science, trust the vaccines, get the vaccines as soon as possible, but continue to use the other safety measures that we know help to prevent you from getting COVID-19.

[01:29:11]Bill Walsh:  OK, thank you very much. Lori Smetanka, do you have any closing thoughts or recommendations?

[01:29:17]Lori Smetanka:  Yes, absolutely. For you and your loved ones in long-term care facilities, stay informed about what's happening in the facility. Ask a lot of questions of the administrator about what's happening, and if you need help, contact your long-term care ombudsman program for assistance.

[01:29:35]Bill Walsh:  OK, and Clarence Anthony, I'll give you the last word.

[01:29:39]Clarence Anthony:  Well, the only thing I'll say is thanks to AARP for this opportunity to uplift this important conversation about the challenges and the questions that residents are having about the access to the vaccine. And I want to just say, as Dr. Johnson, believe in the science and advocate for yourself, and make sure you get access to the vaccine, because this is about the quality of life that you'd like to have. And your mayors and council members and your cities are partners. And thank you again for having us.

[01:30:20]Bill Walsh:  OK. And thanks to each of our guests for being on the panel today. It's been a really informative discussion and thank you, our AARP members and volunteers and listeners for participating today. AARP, a nonprofit, nonpartisan member organization has been working to promote the health and well-being of older Americans for more than 60 years. In the face of this crisis, we're providing information and resources to help older adults and those caring for them protect themselves from the virus, prevent its spread to others while taking care of themselves. All of the resources we referenced today, including a recording of today's Q&A event, can be found at aarp.org/coronavirus beginning tomorrow, Jan. 29. Go there if your question was not addressed, and you'll find the latest updates, as well as information created specifically for older adults and family caregivers. We hope you learned something that can help keep you and your loved ones healthy. Please tune in tonight at 7 p.m. ET for a special live event, "A Virtual World Awaits," where we'll explore resources to help you learn, grow and develop new skills to take care of your mind, body and health during the pandemic. Thank you, and have a good day. This concludes our call.

[01:31:55]

Bill Walsh: Hola, soy Bill Walsh, vicepresidente de AARP, y quiero darles la bienvenida a esta importante discusión sobre el coronavirus. Antes de comenzar, si deseas escuchar esta teleasamblea en español, presiona *0 en el teclado de tu teléfono ahora. AARP, una organización de membresía, sin fines de lucro y no partidista, ha estado trabajando para promover la salud y el bienestar de los adultos mayores en EE.UU. durante más de 60 años.

 

Frente a la pandemia mundial de coronavirus, AARP brinda información y recursos para ayudar a los adultos mayores y a quienes los cuidan. Como muchos de ustedes han visto, al cerrar el primer mes del año nuevo, la pandemia continúa mostrando signos de empeoramiento. Sin embargo, seguimos viendo grandes desafíos en la distribución de la vacuna.

 

Los consumidores se sienten frustrados por los sistemas confusos para registrarse para recibir la inyección. Y a los Gobiernos locales les está costando mantenerse al día con la demanda. Y, desafortunadamente, donde la necesidad es mayor, en hogares de ancianos y centros de cuidados a largo plazo, millones todavía no están vacunados. Abordaremos estos problemas y más con nuestro panel de expertos y responderemos sus preguntas.

 

Si has participado en alguna de nuestras teleasambleas en el pasado, sabes que esto es similar a un programa de entrevistas de radio y tienes la oportunidad de hacer preguntas en vivo. Si deseas escuchar en español, presiona * 0 en el teclado de tu teléfono ahora. Para aquellos de ustedes que se unen por teléfono, si desean hacer una pregunta, presionen * 3 en el teclado de su teléfono para comunicarse con un miembro del personal de AARP que anotará su nombre y pregunta, y los colocará en turno para hacer esa pregunta en vivo. Si te unes a través de Facebook o YouTube, puedes publicar tu pregunta en la sección de comentarios.

 

Hola, si acabas de unirte, soy Bill Walsh de AARP y quiero darte la bienvenida a esta importante discusión sobre la pandemia mundial de coronavirus. Estamos hablando con expertos líderes hoy y respondiendo tus preguntas en vivo. Para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono. Y si te unes a través de Facebook o YouTube, puedes publicar tu pregunta en los comentarios.

 

Hoy nos acompañan Steven C. Johnson, M.D., profesor de Medicina en la División de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la Facultad de Medicina de University of Colorado y del Centro Multidisciplinario sobre Envejecimiento en el Anschutz Medical Campus. Además, Lori Smetanka, directora ejecutiva de la National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, que es la principal organización nacional sin fines de lucro que defiende los derechos de los consumidores que reciben servicios de atención a largo plazo. Y finalmente, el Sr. Clarence Anthony, director ejecutivo de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, en representación de las ciudades de Estados Unidos. También nos acompañará mi colega de AARP, Jean Setzfand, quien ayudará a facilitar sus llamadas hoy.

 

Este evento se está siendo grabado, y podrán acceder a esa grabación en www.aarp.org/coronavirus 24 horas después de que terminemos. Nuevamente, para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en cualquier momento en el teclado de tu teléfono para conectarte con un miembro del personal de AARP. O si te unes a nosotros a través de Facebook o YouTube, coloca tu pregunta en los comentarios. Ahora me gustaría traer a nuestros invitados, cada uno de los cuales ya nos ha acompañado en eventos de teleasamblea previamente.

 

Entonces, estoy encantado de darles la bienvenida nuevamente. Primero, tenemos a Steven C. Johnson, M.D., profesor de Medicina en la División de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Colorado y el Centro Multidisciplinario sobre el Envejecimiento del Campus Médico Anschutz. El Dr. Johnson forma parte del panel de los Institutos Nacionales de Salud para el manejo de la COVID-19. Gracias por estar aquí de nuevo, Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Gracias, Bill. Encantado de estar aquí.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, encantados de recibirte. También tenemos a Lori Smetanka. Es la directora ejecutiva de la Voz Nacional del Consumidor para la Atención de Calidad a Largo Plazo. Esa organización es la principal organización nacional de defensa sin fines de lucro, que representa a los consumidores que reciben atención y servicios a largo plazo en hogares de ancianos, centros de vida asistida y entornos basados ​​en el hogar y la comunidad. Es la responsable de la dirección estratégica de la organización. Bienvenida de nuevo, Lori.

 

Lori Smetanka: Muchas gracias por invitarme de nuevo. Encantada de estar aquí.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Gracias. Y Clarence Anthony es el director ejecutivo de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, la voz de las ciudades, pueblos y aldeas de Estados Unidos, que representa a más de 200 millones de personas. Clarence comenzó su carrera en el servicio público como alcalde de South Bay, Florida. Gracias por acompañarnos, Clarence.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, muchas gracias por invitarme. Es un placer estar de regreso hoy.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Gracias por estar con nosotros. Comencemos con nuestra discusión. Y solo un recordatorio para nuestros oyentes. Para hacer su pregunta, presionen * 3 en el teclado de su teléfono. O pueden colocarla en la sección de comentarios en Facebook o YouTube. Dr. Johnson, comencemos por usted. Hemos escuchado el objetivo de la Administración de Biden de 100 millones de dosis de vacunas en los primeros 100 días. ¿Es eso factible, en su opinión? ¿Y qué se está haciendo para hacer realidad ese objetivo?

 

Steven Johnson: Gracias por esa pregunta. En primer lugar, creo que es factible. Y, de hecho, ha habido un par de días en los que la cantidad de vacunas distribuidas ha sido cercana al millón. Entonces, creo que se puede lograr. Creo que comienza, por supuesto, con el suministro de vacuna en sí.

 

El grado en que se pueden producir y distribuir las dos vacunas autorizadas es importante. Ciertamente, si algunas de las otras vacunas que están en estudio están disponibles bajo una autorización de uso de emergencia, y el suministro aumenta, eso sería genial. Creo que hay algunos problemas a nivel estatal. Creo que hemos reconocido que hay una diferencia entre la cantidad de vacunas que se han recibido y la cantidad que se ha administrado. Y parte de eso se ha relacionado con las prácticas estatales de retener dosis para asegurarse de que la segunda dosis de las vacunas Pfizer y Moderna estén disponible. Pero creo que debemos trabajar en la logística en términos de distribución.

 

Y luego creo que debemos trabajar en métodos para aumentar la administración a nivel estatal y local, lo que puede involucrar grandes eventos de vacunas. Puede implicar asistencia militar, cosas así. Creo que el objetivo es alcanzable, pero sería ideal tener un objetivo más alto porque 1 millón al día para una población de 331 millones, aún llevaría mucho tiempo implementar la vacuna.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bueno, gracias por eso. Permítanme cambiar de dirección un poco. Estamos escuchando noticias sobre una variante de COVID-19 más contagiosa. ¿Qué sabemos sobre eso? ¿Y cómo funcionarán las medidas preventivas actuales, como el uso de mascarillas y el distanciamiento social, frente a las nuevas variantes? ¿Y sabemos algo sobre la efectividad de las vacunas contra esas variantes?

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, comenzaría con algunos puntos básicos, y es que los virus mutan. Ellos cambian. Un buen ejemplo de eso es el virus de la influenza, donde tenemos que rediseñar una vacuna cada año en función de los cambios en la cepa. Pero los coronavirus también mutan, y realmente, hemos reconocido nuevas cepas desde el comienzo de la pandemia. Pero hay algunas cepas nuevas que son preocupantes. Probablemente hayas oído hablar de cepas del Reino Unido, Sudáfrica y Brasil.

 

Lo que parece que sabemos más en este momento es que son más transmisibles. Y, por supuesto, los virus que son más transmisibles significan que más personas se infectarán y luego las consecuencias de eso. Sabemos menos sobre cómo el virus afecta a las personas una vez infectadas. Hay algunos datos preliminares del Reino Unido de que estas variantes podrían ser más peligrosas que el coronavirus circulante original. Ahora, en términos de si las vacunas serán efectivas, creo que la sabiduría convencional en este momento es que seguirán siendo efectivas.

 

Las empresas y los investigadores han estado probando las respuestas de los anticuerpos a estas vacunas. Y en la mayoría de los casos, la vacuna parece funcionar. Aunque, es posible que hayan oído hablar de algunos en los que tal vez fueron menos efectivos. Pero las vacunas inducen una respuesta muy amplia del sistema inmunitario de cada cuerpo. Entonces, nuestra esperanza es que estas vacunas funcionen. Creo que es muy posible que, en el futuro, dentro de un año o dentro de dos años, tengamos que diseñar nuevas vacunas que reflejen mejor la cepa común que esté circulando.

 

Bill Walsh: Es un comentario aleccionador, pensar que esto estará con nosotros por otros dos años.

 

Steven Johnson: Bill, sin embargo, permíteme hacer otro punto. Esto realmente resalta la importancia de estas otras medidas en las que hemos llegado a confiar, en términos de mascarillas y distanciamiento social, etc. Es realmente doblemente importante, mientras aprendemos sobre estas variantes, que las personas no bajen la guardia en términos de estas otras medidas preventivas.

 

Bill Walsh: Y supongo que eso también se aplica a las personas que han recibido la vacuna.

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, estamos aprendiendo más sobre las personas que han recibido la vacuna. Nuestro consejo actual es que esas personas continúen usando las mismas prácticas que todos los demás para evitar la posibilidad de exposición y reinfección, que es posible. Y nuevamente, cuando administramos una vacuna que tiene un 95% de efectividad, eso todavía significa que 1 de cada 20 personas puede no haber respondido a la vacuna. Y en este momento, no sabemos quiénes son ese 5%.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias, Dr. Johnson. Lori Smetanka, me gustaría traerte aquí. ¿Por qué hemos visto retrasos en la entrega de vacunas a los residentes de hogares de ancianos y centros de vida asistida? Estas personas son posiblemente las más vulnerables. El 40% de las muertes por COVID se han producido en esos entornos. ¿En qué se diferencia de los programas disponibles para el público?

 

Lori Smetanka: Mmmm. Ha habido una serie de factores que creemos que están afectando la entrega de las vacunas a los residentes de estas instalaciones, incluidos algunos de los procesos que se utilizan para distribuir las vacunas en cada estado, el número variable de instalaciones y residentes que necesitan ser vacunados, e incluso cosas como la necesidad de obtener un consentimiento por adelantado para emitir la vacuna para algunos de los residentes que no pueden dar su consentimiento por sí mismos.

 

Es necesario que exista un acercamiento a los representantes legales u otras personas que puedan dar parte de ese consentimiento. Estos son algunos de los factores que han estado afectando esto. Muchos estados se han asociado con las farmacias, como saben, para vacunar a los residentes. Y dependen de clínicas o de diferentes procesos que están estableciendo esas farmacias. Tienen que organizarlos y hacer que la gente de las farmacias vaya a las instalaciones para organizar esas clínicas y luego organizar las vacunas para los residentes y el personal. Y cada instalación está programando múltiples clínicas, por lo que está tomando algo de tiempo.

 

Pero sabemos que los hogares de ancianos continúan siendo la máxima prioridad para la distribución de vacunas y que se la ofrecerán a todos los residentes y miembros del personal que estén dispuestos a aceptarla. Y tenemos la esperanza de que con algunas de las nuevas piezas puestas en marcha por el presidente Biden durante la última semana, por ejemplo, aumentando la producción a través de la Ley de Producción de Defensa, conectándose con diferentes entidades para ayudar en la distribución, esperamos que las dosis necesarias se dirigirán a todos los centros de atención a largo plazo lo antes posible.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bien, déjame hacerte una pregunta muy práctica. A lo largo de este proceso, las familias han tenido problemas para obtener información regular y precisa de los centros de enfermería. ¿Qué preguntas debe hacer la familia sobre el programa de vacunas en el hogar de ancianos de su ser querido? ¿Y a qué deberían recurrir si no obtienen las respuestas adecuadas?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, es importante que los residentes y las familias se mantengan tan involucrados e informados como puedan, y que las instalaciones les brinden información oportuna y precisa sobre lo que está sucediendo, no solo en relación con las vacunas, sino también con respecto a la COVID. Con las vacunas, estamos alentando a las personas a que hagan muchas preguntas sobre sus instalaciones. Y algunas cosas que pueden preguntar, por ejemplo, son, ¿cuándo se administrarán las vacunas? ¿Cuál es el proceso que se ha puesto en marcha? ¿Y cuál es el horario?

 

Y si, por alguna razón, el residente no puede hacerse ese tiempo, por ejemplo, personas que van a las visitas al médico, o algunas personas han sido hospitalizadas, ¿habrá días y horarios alternativos disponibles para que el residente sea vacunado? ¿Cómo obtendrá el hogar de ancianos el consentimiento para aquellas personas que no puedan darlo por sí mismas? ¿Y eso se puede arreglar con la mayor antelación posible antes de las clínicas que se están estableciendo?

 

Pregunte sobre las tasas de vacunación en el centro hasta el momento. ¿Y qué pasa si un residente opta por no vacunarse? ¿Se ofrecerá en el futuro si cambian de opinión y pueden vacunarse en algún momento en el futuro? Y también, pregunte qué tipo de procesos y protecciones se implementarán para proteger a todos los residentes, reconociendo que algunos residentes y personal se están negando en este momento a recibir la vacuna. Necesitamos asegurarnos de que las personas estarán protegidas.

 

Y si no obtienen respuestas satisfactorias a las preguntas, animamos a las personas a que hablen con la administración de la instalación. Pero también deben comunicarse con su programa de defensor del pueblo de atención a largo plazo para obtener ayuda. Y pueden encontrar un defensor del pueblo que defienda a los residentes en centros de atención a largo plazo. Pueden encontrar uno en su área visitando nuestro sitio web en www.theconsumervoice.org, todo en una sola palabra. Y allí pueden conseguir la información de contacto del defensor del pueblo local.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Y ese es un punto realmente importante para nuestros oyentes. Hay defensores del pueblo en todo el país. Y están ahí para ayudar a defenderlos en su nombre con los centros de atención a largo plazo. Esa dirección web que Lori acaba de proporcionar fue www.theconsumervoice.org. También hay una línea directa para el localizador de cuidados para ancianos. Ese número es 800-677-1116. Eso es 1-800-677-1116. Nuevamente, si tienes problemas con las instalaciones donde se encuentran tus seres queridos, llama a ese número. Solicita comunicarse con el defensor del pueblo. Y deberían ayudarte. Bien, gracias por eso, Lori.

 

Clarence, vamos contigo. Hemos escuchado muchas quejas de consumidores sobre no poder recibir una vacuna, o incluso sobre cómo inscribirse para vacunarse en algunos casos. ¿Cuáles son los desafíos a los que se enfrentan los Gobiernos locales en la distribución de la vacuna? ¿Y qué se está haciendo para abordarlos? ¿Y qué recursos locales necesitan los Gobiernos para ayudar?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Gracias de nuevo por invitarme. Creo que uno de los mayores desafíos para los Gobiernos locales y la mayoría de los funcionarios municipales es que no somos directamente responsables de la distribución en la mayoría de las ciudades de Estados Unidos porque no tenemos nuestros propios departamentos de salud. Pero, por lo general, trabajamos en colaboración con los funcionarios de nuestro condado para hacer llegar la información a nuestros residentes. Y lo único que estamos animando a hacer a nuestros socios, y lo están haciendo, es a defenderse.

 

Y Lori habló sobre las formas en que pueden tener acceso y también, si no obtienen la información que necesitan, ¿a dónde pueden ir? La mayoría de las veces, y el nivel de Gobierno más confiable, es el Gobierno local y las ciudades, pueblos y aldeas de todo Estados Unidos. Y lo que nos preocupa profundamente es que esa responsabilidad que tenemos como líderes confiables esté en riesgo porque no hemos podido poner el dinero directamente en manos de los líderes de la ciudad, para poder ayudarlos a tener acceso a la vacuna.

 

A mis alcaldes y concejales les preocupa mucho que las personas con mayor riesgo, que han sufrido de manera desproporcionada las infecciones por COVID, sufran enfermedades y muertes, especialmente en las poblaciones negras, indígenas y de color. Y muchos de ellos no han tenido acceso a la vacuna por varias razones. Pero puedo decirles que el sistema de salud y que el acceso y esta desconfianza en el día a día está provocando que nuestros residentes no se comuniquen tanto y reciban la inyección que sabemos que es fundamental para tener una vida sana y a largo plazo.

 

No hay duda de que existe una gran desconexión entre la oferta y la demanda y una falta de comprensión. Entonces, lo que estamos tratando de hacer es asegurarnos de sentarnos con esos trabajadores de la salud y de sentarnos con los departamentos de salud y los líderes estatales y compartir las preocupaciones de nuestras comunidades, nuestros residentes, para que puedan entender esas variables, y luego pueden superarlas.

 

Claramente, les diré, que la brecha tecnológica en el acceso es un gran desafío para la primera ronda de población de mayor edad en Estados Unidos. Estamos en primera línea. Nos lo tomamos en serio. Estamos presentes. Y eso es lo importante. Pero tenemos que asociarnos con los sistemas de salud pública de nuestros condados y estados.

 

Bill Walsh: Gracias, Clarence. Como la mayoría de nuestros oyentes sabrán, cada estado está manejando su programa de distribución de vacunas de maneras un poco diferentes. Un recurso que AARP ha creado para ayudar a las personas a comprender lo que está sucediendo donde viven está en nuestro sitio web. Hemos creado guías estado por estado. Pueden consultarlas en www.aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Simplemente elijes tu estado y obtendrás un resumen bastante fácil de leer de sus planes de distribución, números de teléfono útiles y también preguntas para hacerle a tus profesionales de la salud. Le agradezco a todos nuestros invitados. Y como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes… oh, continúa.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es muy importante tener ese tipo de información. Y les diré, hay ciudades como Dallas que tienen campos de registro donde la gente ingresa, que no tienen tecnología y tienen barreras idiomáticas. Por lo tanto, los líderes de la ciudad están trabajando con AARP, y AARP es un gran socio para obtener la información.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, bueno, gracias. Como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes, para hacer una pregunta, presiona n* 3. Responderemos esas preguntas muy pronto. Pero antes de hacerlo, quería traer a la vicepresidenta ejecutiva y directora de Activismo Legislativo y Compromiso de AARP, Nancy LeaMond. Bienvenida, Nancy.

 

Nancy LeaMond: Gracias, Bill. Gracias por invitarme.

 

Bill Walsh: Nancy, ¿qué está haciendo AARP para luchar por los mayores de 50 años a medida que se implementan las vacunas y para asegurarse de que sepan cómo recibir las vacunas en sus estados?

 

Nancy LeaMond: Bueno, durante meses, y en realidad parecen años, pero durante meses, AARP ha pedido que se tomen medidas para mejorar la salud y la seguridad económica de los adultos mayores en EE.UU. y de todas las personas en el país durante la pandemia. A medida que continúan aumentando el número de muertos, las tasas de hospitalización, el número de casos y el impacto económico de la pandemia, es un momento crítico para todos nosotros. Y aunque estamos viendo una enorme demanda de vacunas contra la COVID, sabemos que muchos de ustedes están increíblemente frustrados por no haber podido recibir la vacuna, o simplemente obtener información clara sobre cuándo podrán hacerlo. Y cuando buscan información [INAUDIBLE] simplemente en línea, necesitamos centros de llamadas 1-800 en cada estado, donde puedas hablar con alguien y obtener respuestas a tus preguntas. Esta es la tarea más importante a la que se enfrenta la nueva administración. No hay tiempo para retrasos ni obstáculos.

 

AARP está redoblando nuestros esfuerzos para brindar a las personas mayores de 50 años información confiable sobre las vacunas. De hecho, como acabas de mencionar, acabamos de publicar guías en línea para cada estado, en las que se explica cómo obtener vacunas en el lugar donde vives. Y los actualizaremos a medida que obtengamos más información. Continuamos luchando para que los adultos mayores tengan prioridad para recibir las vacunas contra la COVID-19 porque la ciencia ha demostrado claramente que las personas mayores tienen un mayor riesgo de muerte. Ha habido 420,000 muertes por COVID-19. Y el 95% de ellos han sido personas mayores de 50 años. El 40% de las muertes por COVID también han sido personas que viven y trabajan en hogares de ancianos, a pesar de ser solo el 1% de la población.

 

Ahora, a nivel federal, nos complació ver el enfoque de la Administración de Biden en la distribución de vacunas, incluida la protección de los residentes y el personal de atención a largo plazo que han sido devastados por esta pandemia. Y también instamos a que las vacunas estén disponibles a través de los centros móviles de vacunas para aquellos que están atrapados en sus hogares. También estamos agradecidos de ver propuestas para nuevos pagos de estímulo económico, fondos adicionales para asistencia nutricional, licencia por enfermedad y familiar paga para mantener a las familias saludables, y ayuda a los Gobiernos estatales y locales que se han visto tan afectados por esta crisis. Instamos a una acción federal rápida sobre estas políticas.

 

AARP también ha sido muy activa a nivel estatal. Nuestros comprometidos voluntarios de 16 oficinas estatales de AARP están participando en grupos de trabajo formales dirigidos por sus gobernadores y departamentos de salud estatales. Esto incluye Idaho, Carolina del Norte, Tennessee, California y muchos otros. Y los defensores de AARP en cada estado están instando a los gobernadores y legisladores estatales a mejorar la información y la coordinación sobre el lanzamiento de la vacuna contra la COVID-19.

 

Mientras tanto, abogamos por proteger programas como servicios para personas mayores, atención domiciliaria y comunitaria, asistencia energética para personas de bajos ingresos y programas de asistencia laboral y de desempleo. Nada de este trabajo, luchar por nuestros casi 38 millones de miembros, sería posible sin la dedicación y pasión del personal, los voluntarios y los defensores de base de AARP en todo el país. Y sabemos que muchos de ellos están en esta llamada hoy.

 

Para mantenerte actualizado sobre todos estos esfuerzos y encontrar resúmenes de los planes estatales para la distribución de vacunas, visita www.aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Muchas gracias. Gracias, Bill, y gracias a todos nuestros panelistas expertos.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muchas gracias por esa actualización, Nancy. Y como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes, para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3. Ahora es el momento de abordar sus preguntas sobre el coronavirus con el Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka y Clarence Anthony. Presiona * 3 en cualquier momento en el teclado de tu teléfono para conectarte con un miembro del personal de AARP y compartir tu pregunta. Ahora me gustaría traer a mi colega de AARP, Jean Setzfand, para ayudar a facilitar sus llamadas hoy. Bienvenida, Jean.

 

Jean Setzfand: Muchas gracias, Bill. Encantada de estar aquí para esta importante conversación.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, ¿quién es el primero en la línea?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra primera llamada es de Celestine de Míchigan.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Celestine. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con la llamada.

 

Celestine: Quería hacer una pregunta. Tengo 75 años y he estado tratando de averiguar cuándo podré ponerme esa vacuna.

 

Bill Walsh: ¿Cuándo podrá recibir la vacuna?

 

Celestine: Sí, estoy en Míchigan, Burton.

 

Bill Walsh: Bueno, muy bien. Dr. Johnson, ¿quiere abordar eso?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, con gusto. Gracias por la pregunta. Estoy más familiarizado con mi estado natal de Colorado. Ciertamente, la edad de 75 años encaja en una de las prioridades de la guía de los CDC sobre quién debe vacunarse. Y ciertamente lo estamos haciendo para las personas mayores de 70 años. En realidad, otros estados lo están haciendo para personas mayores de 65 años. Sin duda, debería calificar para una vacuna temprana. Parte de la pregunta, y Bill, tal vez AARP tiene algunos recursos para Míchigan, es una especie de método.

 

Por ejemplo, en Colorado tenemos una línea directa de vacunas a la que las personas pueden llamar para que puedan ser emparejadas con los proveedores que están proporcionando la vacuna. Mencionaré que solo en nuestro sistema de salud aquí, tenemos 100,000 personas mayores de 70 años. Por lo tanto, incluso las personas que son una prioridad, puede llevar varias semanas. Pero ciertamente necesitas estar en una lista para recibir una vacuna. Y no sé si alguno de nuestros otros expertos puede brindar más consejos locales sobre cómo manejar eso en Míchigan.

 

Bill Walsh: Clarence, ¿tienes alguna recomendación para Celestine sobre los recursos locales a los que podría contactar?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. En realidad, volvía a tu recomendación, en primer lugar. Sí incluye una de las barreras, y es tratar de volver atrás y mirar los sitios web estatales para identificar dónde se puede acceder a la vacuna. La otra cosa es, una vez más, vuelve al uso de la tecnología, poder hacer cosas simples como pedirles a sus hijos, un vecino o un miembro de la familia que lo ayuden a acceder en línea para recibir la vacuna, porque la mayoría de las veces, tienes que registrarte para obtener una cita, lo que, de nuevo, puede ser una barrera para algunos. Y creo que la otra cosa es acceder a parte de la información del departamento de salud del condado y ver si pueden ayudarte a registrarte. Lo que está planteando Celestine es claramente un problema de coordinación e información porque no hay duda de que debería estar en ese primer nivel de prioridad. Espero que tenga ese sistema de apoyo a su alrededor.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro.

 

Steven Johnson: Bill, solo iba a decir, otro recurso sería su médico local. Ciertamente cumplo ese papel para todos mis pacientes que me llaman. Y puedo indicarles cómo pueden inscribirse en la lista, etc., por ejemplo, a la línea directa de vacunas. Entonces, si Celestine tiene un médico de atención primaria, imagino que sería una fuente de consejo.

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una muy buena sugerencia. Y mientras hablamos, nuestro excelente personal aquí en AARP ha buscado las pautas para Míchigan. Y tengo un par de consejos para ti, Celestine. Puedes llamar al Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de Míchigan. Tienen un número gratuito para averiguar si eres elegible y cómo reservar una cita. Ese número es 888-535-6136. Eso es 888-535-6136. O puedes enviarles un correo electrónico a covid19@michigan.gov. También vemos aquí que, en Míchigan, las personas mayores de 65 años son elegibles para vacunarse primero. Eso suena como una buena noticia para ti, Celestine. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Myriam de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Myriam. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Myriam: Ahora que estoy escuchando toda esta información, estoy un poco inquieta de querer ir a un hogar. Los dos somos ancianos, mi esposo y yo. Tenemos 90 años. Y tenemos que salir de nuestra casa e ingresar a un hogar de salud. La pregunta es, ¿cómo se supone que voy a entrar en un hogar, un hogar para personas mayores, si todo esto está sucediendo?

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una excelente pregunta. Lori, ¿puedes abordar eso para Myriam y otras personas que podrían estar interesadas?

 

Lori Smetanka: Claro. Sé que ha sido una gran preocupación para las personas a lo largo de esta pandemia, pensar si necesita ayuda adicional o si está buscando mudarse a una residencia de vida asistida o para personas mayores donde puede obtener algunos servicios adicionales. Y creo que debes hacer preguntas antes de ingresar a una instalación, que podría ayudar a determinar, en primer lugar, si tal vez podrías recibir algunos servicios en tu propia casa. Tal vez tu Agencia local sobre el Envejecimiento pueda trabajar contigo para ayudarte a evaluar si realmente puedes lograr que las personas vengan a tu propia casa y te brinden apoyo adicional.

 

Pero si crees que estás pensando en mudarte a otra residencia donde puedas obtener algunos servicios adicionales, haz preguntas sobre cómo están manejando la crisis de COVID. Pregunta qué protecciones están implementando para sus residentes allí y cómo se aseguran de que ellos y el personal estén protegidos. ¿Tienen suficientes personas disponibles para brindar servicios? ¿Tienen suficientes equipos de protección y mascarillas para todos, por ejemplo? ¿Y cuáles son las tasas de vacunación que hay? Para que sepas si otros residentes y personal están siendo vacunados o no. Y también, pregunta sobre cualquier brote relacionado con COVID. Puedes encontrar que algunos de los lugares que estás viendo no han tenido brotes. Y es más probable que dirijas tu atención a esos antes que a otros. Pero hacer preguntas, creo, es una muy buena idea.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muchas gracias, Lori. Y gracias, Myriam, por esa pregunta. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Karen de Wisconsin.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Karen. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Karen: Sí. Mi pregunta está relacionada con la vacuna en sí. Si alguien en su hogar ha recibido la vacuna, ¿es posible que, en los pocos días posteriores a la inyección, transmita el virus a otras personas en el hogar?

 

Bill Walsh: Pregunta interesante. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede responder esa pregunta de Karen?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esa es una excelente pregunta. Las dos vacunas que están disponibles, y realmente, las otras tres o cuatro vacunas que se encuentran en estados avanzados de desarrollo, ninguna de ellas son vacunas vivas. No hay riesgo de que alguien que reciba la vacuna transmita el virus a otras personas.

 

Sin embargo, existe la duda de si la vacuna protege completamente contra la infección o si evita que más personas se enfermen. Una de las preguntas sin respuesta es, si alguien recibe una vacuna, y dentro de un mes se expone a la COVID-19, ¿podría adquirir tal vez una infección más leve y luego transmitirla? Pero en términos de las secuelas inmediatas de la vacuna, no hay riesgo de que nada de la vacuna se transmita a otras personas.

 

Bill Walsh: Supongo, sin embargo, que habla del punto que estabas haciendo antes sobre la necesidad de un distanciamiento social continuo y el uso de mascarillas, incluso una vez que te hayas vacunado.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que ese es el consejo principal. Hay una comunicación reciente de los CDC sobre los trabajadores de la salud que no necesariamente necesitan ponerse en cuarentena durante dos semanas completas si han recibido la vacuna. Esa es una pequeña información que es un poco diferente. Pero creo que hasta que sepamos más, nos gustaría que las medidas que todos han tomado para evitar la adquisición de COVID-19 hasta ahora continúen exactamente de la misma manera después de sus vacunas, hasta que sepamos más.

 

Bill Walsh: Y sé que la ciencia todavía es poco clara en esto, Dr. Johnson, pero ¿tenemos una idea de cuánta protección le brinda la primera dosis? Obviamente, la FDA recomienda que las personas reciban dos dosis de estas dos primeras vacunas. ¿Cuánta protección tienen las personas si acaban de recibir una vacuna?

 

Steven Johnson: Creemos que una dosis proporciona cierta protección. Y en los estudios iniciales de la vacuna Pfizer, las personas que estaban a 10 días de su primera dosis parecían tener un riesgo bajo de desarrollar una infección. Pero no sabemos hasta qué punto protege esa primera dosis, ni cuánto tiempo protege. A menudo, una dosis de refuerzo está destinada no solo a fortalecer el sistema inmunitario, sino también a prolongar el tiempo de protección. Y si has seguido las noticias, el país de Israel ha sido muy agresivo en el despliegue de la vacuna, y de hecho, han informado que creen que algunas de las personas que han recibido una dosis de la vacuna han adquirido COVID-19 entre las dos dosis. Entonces, me gustaría que la gente viera esa primera dosis como importante, pero también la segunda como esencial.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Bueno, gracias. Myriam, no sé si todavía estás en la línea, pero quería mencionar un recurso para ti y otras personas que tenían preguntas sobre la COVID y los hogares de ancianos y centros de vida asistida. AARP ha creado un recurso en línea para que puedas ver los detalles de cada instalación, o al menos la mayoría de ellas en todo el país. Y eso está en www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Hay un pequeño resumen de cada una de las instalaciones en todo el país, o al menos aquellas que están reportando datos. Y podría darte una idea del nivel de las tasas de infección en varias instalaciones y las precauciones que están tomando. Bien, Jean, volvamos a los teléfonos. ¿Quién es nuestro próximo interlocutor?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Dorothy de Massachusetts.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Dorothy. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Dorothy: Mi pregunta es, hay muchos de nosotros que no tenemos una computadora. Soy mayor. Tengo 87 años. Mi marido tiene 90 años. Los dos somos discapacitados y nadie ha hablado siquiera de qué hacer con las personas que no pueden salir de casa. Somos muchos los que todavía vivimos en casa y no se ha considerado enviar a alguien para que nos cuide, porque no podemos ir a sentarnos durante dos o tres horas. Apenas podemos estar de pie. Y ese es un gran problema, creo, para las personas mayores, y no ha habido ninguna pregunta al respecto. Gracias.

 

Bill Walsh: Déjame preguntarte, Dorothy. ¿Has recibido información sobre la vacuna? ¿Te has apuntado ya a alguna lista?

 

Dorothy: No, no lo hemos hecho. Ni siquiera pudimos hacernos pruebas porque las filas eran demasiado largas, tres o cuatro horas en el coche, era simplemente imposible.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo. Te escucho. Clarence, ¿puedes responder la pregunta de Dorothy? Creo que es una pregunta que tiene mucha gente.

 

Clarence: Sí, estoy de acuerdo con Dorothy. Esa es una de las barreras que estamos viendo con el sitio web de los departamentos de salud, el acceso a la tecnología. Creo que lo importante es levantar el teléfono y llamar a su departamento de salud local y asegurarse de que sepan que calificas y que... Tienen programas que realmente te ayudarían a vacunarte o te pondrían en línea para poder conseguirlo. Creo que ciudades como Nueva York, y esa no es una ciudad de tamaño común de ninguna manera, pero tienen un programa de transporte de vacuna para todos que ayuda a las personas de 65 años o más, llevándolas a los sitios de vacunación y no tienen que esperar, si no que las hacen pasar derecho por el lugar.

 

La ciudad de Tallahassee, Florida, ofrece autobuses hacia y desde el sitio de vacunación. Y ese tipo de cosas son realmente útiles. Pero sí creo que hay casos especiales que tendremos que considerar, y son aquellos que no pueden hacer fila. No pueden salir durante dos horas. Y muchos de los departamentos de salud y estados están comenzando a considerar esos programas. Pero en este momento, esa es la barrera más grande que estamos viendo a nivel nacional.

 

Bill Walsh: Correcto. Bien, gracias, Clarence. Y Dorothy, mientras Clarence hablaba, nuestro excelente personal de AARP estaba buscando información sobre Massachusetts y descubrió un par de cosas. Lo primero es que, a partir del 1 de febrero, las personas de 75 años o más en Massachusetts podrán programar una cita para recibir la vacuna. También tenemos un número para que llames. Es el Departamento de Salud de Massachusetts. Ese número es 617-624-6000. Eso es 617-624-6000, el Departamento de Salud de Massachusetts. Deberían poder darte información sobre dónde ir y cómo inscribirse para recibir la vacuna en Massachusetts. Bien, Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Eileen de California.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Eileen. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Eileen: Oh.

 

Bill Walsh: Eileen, ¿estás con nosotros?

 

Eileen: Hola. Tengo 95 años, tengo 17 medicamentos diferentes a los que soy alérgica y me preguntaba si debería ponerme esa inyección o no.

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una muy buena pregunta. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede abordar eso para Eileen y otras personas que tienen alergias a los medicamentos?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por tu pregunta. Y eso en realidad ha sido bien estudiado hasta ahora. Afortunadamente, tanto con la vacuna Pfizer como con la vacuna Moderna, el riesgo de una reacción alérgica es muy bajo. Al decir eso, ha habido algunas reacciones alérgicas. Y uno de los riesgos de una reacción alérgica son las personas que tienen antecedentes de varias alergias. Pero la única contraindicación real para la vacuna es si eres alérgica a los componentes de la vacuna.

 

Y la vacuna, además del material genético del virus, el ARN mensajero, hay algunas grasas que llamamos lípidos, y algunas otras sustancias químicas y así sucesivamente. En nuestro centro, hemos estado vacunando habitualmente a personas que tienen antecedentes de alergias. Y la única precaución adicional es que las personas con alergias sean monitoreadas en la clínica un poco más. La mayoría de las personas, una vez que han recibido la vacuna, pueden irse después de 15 minutos. Pero la recomendación es para las personas que tienen múltiples alergias, que esperen 30 minutos. Una reacción alérgica es algo que podemos manejar. Y todavía siento que los beneficios de la vacuna COVID-19 superan con creces los riesgos.

 

Bill Walsh: Para Eileen, ¿le recomendaría que se registre para recibir la vacuna y le diga a la persona que le está aplicando la inyección que "Soy alérgica a estos 17 medicamentos" para avisarles y que puedan observarla?

 

Steven Johnson: Creo que es una gran idea. Y de hecho creo que eso sucedería de todos modos. Cuando vas por tu vacuna, una de las partes rutinarias del asesoramiento es mirar tu lista de alergias. Y si hay algo en esa lista de alergias que preocupe, el personal sanitario debería detectarlo. Pero creo que puedes ayudar asegurándote de que tu lista de alergias esté completa e informando al proveedor de atención médica que administra la vacuna sobre esas alergias.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Gracias, Dr. Johnson. Jean, tomemos otra llamada.

 

Jean Setzfand: Suena bien. Tenemos muchas llamadas. También tenemos muchas preguntas en YouTube que he estado posponiendo, así que déjame ir por ellas. Linda de YouTube está haciendo una pregunta similar. He escuchado que uno no debe tomar medicamentos antiinflamatorios, como Aspirina, Advil, Motrin, antes de tomar la vacuna. ¿Pueden aclarar? Y si es así, ¿qué tan pronto después de recibir la vacuna puedes tomar esos medicamentos?

 

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por esa pregunta. Quiero asegurarme de que respondamos esto correctamente. Hubo... Esto está un poco fuera de tema, pero hubo preocupación en un momento de que los agentes antiinflamatorios pudieran tener un resultado adverso en las personas cuando desarrollan COVID-19. Y eso realmente ha sido refutado. En términos de agentes antiinflamatorios alrededor de la vacuna, si no es necesario tomar esos medicamentos adicionales, creo que es razonable no tomarlos.

 

Los medicamentos antiinflamatorios que más nos preocuparían serían los medicamentos de tipo esteroide porque los esteroides pueden debilitar su sistema inmunitario y, en consecuencia, pueden disminuir tu respuesta a la vacuna. Esos pueden ser medicamentos como prednisona o hidrocortisona, otros esteroides, etc. El otro problema que surge es si puedes usar antiinflamatorios o analgésicos después de la vacuna, solo porque pueden ocurrir algunos efectos secundarios, como dolor en el brazo y fiebre, etc.

 

Mi consejo es que las personas no se sientan enfermas, pero en general, les aconsejo que usen un medicamento como el acetaminofén, o algo así, para lidiar con los efectos secundarios relacionados con la vacuna. Pero el principal problema antiinflamatorio antes de la vacuna serían los esteroides.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias. Jean, tomemos otra pregunta.

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Frank de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Frank. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Frank: Mi mamá tiene unos 90 años. Sé que van a ir a los hogares de ancianos para vacunar a los residentes. Si ella se niega a vacunarse y yo tengo un poder notarial, ¿puedo anular eso para obligarlos a vacunarla? Y después del hecho, ¿cómo hacemos para ponerle la vacuna? Cuando digo “después del hecho” me refiero a van, les daban la vacuna a los pacientes, y ella no tiene eso. ¿Cómo nos ocupamos de eso?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien, Frank. Lori, ¿quieres abordar esa pregunta?

 

Lori Smetanka: Claro. Creo que si su madre está preocupada por la vacuna, creo que deberíamos intentar obtener su información sobre la seguridad de la misma y por qué es una buena idea que la reciba. Si es competente y capaz de tomar sus propias decisiones, entonces ciertamente deberías poder hacerlo. Y sabemos que para muchas personas, si dudan en colocarse la vacuna, muchas veces, educar ha sido el factor que los anima a reconsiderar y realmente a recibirla. Por lo tanto, si te preocupa su voluntad de vacunarse, tendría una buena conversación con ella y le pediría al personal que hable con ella o su médico sobre por qué es importante vacunarse.

 

Para las personas que pueden negarse la primera vez que se llevan a cabo las clínicas, las farmacias o cualquiera que sea el proceso en los hogares de ancianos, debería haber oportunidades en fechas posteriores para que las personas reciban la vacuna. Y te alentaríamos a que hables con la administración de la instalación sobre cómo se asegurarán de que las personas que tal vez más adelante cambien de opinión o quieran vacunarse, o incluso para las personas nuevas que ingresan, que la recibirán. Entonces, conversa con tu madre. Habla con el administrador y su médico sobre cuáles pueden ser los procesos y cómo asegurarse de que pueda vacunarse si lo necesita.

 

Bill Walsh: Bien, gracias por eso, Lori. Y gracias por todas esas buenas preguntas. Pronto responderemos más preguntas. Recuerda, para hacer una pregunta, y presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono para ingresar a la cola. Me gustaría acudir a nuestros expertos. Clarence, has escuchado en muchas de las llamadas que hemos recibido hasta ahora, la gente está teniendo problemas para averiguar por dónde empezar a inscribirse para la vacuna. ¿Cuál es tu consejo? ¿Cuál es el primer punto de contacto en el que las personas deberían pensar en sus comunidades si quieren comunicarse y averiguar cómo recibir la vacuna? Y supongamos que es posible que no tengan acceso a Internet.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es un desafío que estamos viendo ahora mismo en todo Estados Unidos. Mi primer punto de recomendación, como el Dr. Johnson compartió en cierto modo es que, me gusta la idea de hablar con tu médico para ver si tienen información o si pueden, mientras estás allí, acceder a dónde puedes encontrar esa información.

 

Volveré nuevamente a decirles que su ayuntamiento, el departamento de salud de su condado, es un lugar que está allí para orientarte y brindarte esa información. Lo que estamos viendo, en términos de nuestros alcaldes y concejales en todo Estados Unidos, es que se están asociando con grupos vecinales, asociaciones, organizaciones sin fines de lucro. La YMCA tiene un gran programa. Y, por supuesto, AARP tiene un gran programa para educar a todas las comunidades.

 

La única comunidad, de nuevo, que todavía está desequilibrada para mí y tiene mayor necesidad, son algunas de las comunidades más pobres y de personas de color. Pero los sitios de vacunación no están ahí. Tenemos que concentrarnos y tenemos que gestionar ese tipo de acceso porque la gente de color lo contrae tres y cuatro veces más y se muere porque no tiene acceso. Entonces, nuestros alcaldes y miembros del consejo, los líderes de la ciudad se están asociando con todos para tratar de obtener información.

 

Bill Walsh: Bueno, ese es un punto muy interesante. Iba a tocar eso a continuación. ¿Cuánto está viendo en términos de alcance a esas comunidades de todo el país? ¿Y estamos viendo mucha resistencia a vacunarse? Sé que en algunas comunidades de color existe cierta renuencia histórica a confiar en el establecimiento médico.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Bueno, la Liga Nacional de Ciudades está trabajando en una iniciativa con la directora ejecutiva de AARP, la Sra. Jenkins, que vamos a salir y comenzaremos a hablar sobre educación sobre la vacuna. No estamos hablando de que debas o no debas, porque creo que esas experiencias históricas que los estadounidenses negros han tenido con tantas cosas, no solo históricas, sino incluso mirando hoy, que estamos arrojando luz sobre las desigualdades. Y hay una falta de confianza en este momento.

 

Entonces, nuestro objetivo aquí es simplemente contar los datos de la vacuna y compartir, si tienes ciertos problemas de salud, es posible que esto no te afecte. Aún debes vacunarte, como ha indicado el Dr. Johnson. Creo que ese es un primer paso. Pero también debemos reconocer las limitaciones de transporte. Y nuevamente, cuando hablamos de poblaciones de 65 años o más, hay mucho por educar. Y creo que dependerá de todos, de la comunidad médica y cada parte de nuestra comunidad, lograr que la gente confíe en que esta vacuna es segura y que si desea vivir una vida de calidad, es importante recibirla.

 

Bill Walsh: Sí. Bueno, gracias, Clarence. Y, como mencionaste, AARP está haciendo todo lo posible para conocer los hechos sobre la vacuna. Si deseas saber cómo recibir la vacuna cerca de donde vives, visita www.aarp.org/coronavirus. Tenemos una herramienta allí donde puedes elegir tu estado y ver cuáles son sus pautas estatales locales. Si no tienes acceso a Internet, creo que Clarence dio buenos consejos. Llama a tu médico. Ese es un buen primer paso. Llama a tu departamento de salud local o estatal. O llama a tus funcionarios electos locales. Es por eso por lo que los elegimos, para ayudarnos a servirnos y asegurarnos de que, en tiempos de crisis, obtengamos las respuestas que todos necesitamos.

 

Permítame volver a hablar con usted, Dr. Johnson. Como hizo referencia Clarence, la COVID-19 ha tenido un impacto devastador en nuestros adultos mayores y personas de color. ¿Qué se está haciendo para proteger a quienes corren mayor riesgo en la pandemia? ¿Están siendo priorizados en la distribución de vacunas?

 

Steven Johnson: Permítanme comenzar con la edad. Creo que las personas mayores de cierta edad han sido una gran prioridad. Los trabajadores de la salud formaron parte de la fase inicial, los residentes del hogar de ancianos y el personal. Pero realmente, justo después de eso ha habido personas mayores de cierta edad. Como mencioné, los diferentes estados están usando diferentes límites de edad. En Colorado, estamos usando la edad de 70 en este momento. Lo que hemos aprendido es que este grupo de más de 70 años es realmente un grupo muy grande. Por lo tanto, aunque prioricemos a las personas, puede llevar semanas con la infraestructura y el suministro de vacunas actuales para que esta población esté completamente vacunada. Esa ha sido una gran prioridad.

 

Creo que es un conjunto de cuestiones más difíciles con respecto a las personas de color, y me gustaría que mis colegas también intervinieran en esto, porque creo que se trata de una cuestión multifactorial. Por un lado, ciertas personas de color pueden correr un mayor riesgo de exposición a la COVID-19 según las condiciones de vida, las circunstancias laborales, etc. Pero ese es un grupo que también puede tener menos acceso a la atención médica y puede tener algunos problemas de confianza, puede tener más dudas sobre las vacunas.

 

Creo que hemos visto tasas más bajas de vacunación. Sé que nuestros Gobiernos estatales y locales en Colorado están reconociendo esto como un problema. Es decir, a pesar de tener pautas sobre la edad, ciertas personas de color no se vacunan tan rápidamente como otras.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Déjame hacer un rápido seguimiento de eso. Todos hemos escuchado mucho sobre las vacunas Pfizer y Moderna que se están distribuyendo ahora. ¿Qué sabemos acerca de las otras candidatas, como AstraZeneca y Johnson & Johnson? ¿Ayudarán a garantizar un suministro suficiente? ¿Y qué sabemos de su eficacia?

 

Steven Johnson: Lo notable de las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer es que no solo son muy efectivas, sino que sus resultados son muy similares. Y son tan similares que nos sentimos cómodos recomendando a las personas que si se les ofrece una u otra, deberían recibir cualquiera de los dos porque la tasa de efectividad es aproximadamente del 95%, el potencial de efectos secundarios es similar, y así sucesivamente.

 

Se vuelve un poco diferente cuando hablamos de otras vacunas. Ya sabemos bastante sobre la vacuna AstraZeneca, que no es una vacuna viva, pero es una tecnología diferente a las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer. Y hay resultados más mixtos en términos de efectividad. Hay ciertos subgrupos que tienen una mayor tasa de éxito que otros. Por lo tanto, no es tan preciso como los datos de las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer. Como algunos de ustedes sabrán, la vacuna AstraZeneca se está utilizando en otros países, incluido el Reino Unido. La vacuna Johnson & Johnson es una tecnología muy similar a la vacuna AstraZeneca. Nuevamente, no es una vacuna viva. Lo emocionante de esa vacuna es que es una sola dosis. Y si tiene éxito, por supuesto, será mucho más eficiente que una serie de dos dosis.

 

Realmente esperamos tener esos resultados en cualquier momento. Creo que le dije de broma a Bill que podríamos saber algo durante la hora del programa. Es sorprendente lo rápido que se obtienen los resultados con la COVID-19. Pero deberíamos saber eso pronto. Y una vez que conozcamos los resultados, sabremos el impacto que tendrá en la cadena de suministro. Otra vacuna de la que somos parte aquí en University of Colorado es la vacuna Novavax, que es una tecnología diferente. Me alienta la cantidad de vacunas candidatas. Y, con suerte, estos candidatos posteriores serán tan exitosos como las dos vacunas que estamos usando actualmente.

 

Bill Walsh: Seguro que eso esperamos. Y si una de esas vacunas obtiene la aprobación, o vemos algunos datos sobre eso durante la llamada, lo anunciaremos aquí a nuestros oyentes en vivo. Escuchen, para nuestros oyentes, quiero mencionar algo. Estamos viendo un par de consultas de personas que dicen: "Estoy esperando que mi médico me llame sobre la vacuna". Este no es el momento para esperar a que tu médico llame. Este es un momento para valerse por sí mismo. No esperes a que suene el teléfono. Necesitas comunicarte para colocarte en la lista. Si eres un cuidador, comunícate en nombre de tus seres queridos. Este es un momento para abogar por ti mismo y por tus seres queridos porque sabemos que estos Gobiernos locales están luchando con la divulgación y la información. Por lo tanto, toma la responsabilidad de obtener la información que necesitas.

 

De acuerdo, Lori, quería preguntarte sobre los hogares de ancianos y las instalaciones de vida asistida. Hemos escuchado una enorme frustración de nuestros miembros por no poder ver a sus seres queridos, estar en contacto con ellos. ¿En qué momento crees que esas instalaciones pueden comenzar a aliviar las restricciones que han establecido? ¿Y crees que algunas de esas precauciones serán permanentes?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, estas son preguntas realmente geniales y también las escuchamos mucho de nuestros miembros, y son preguntas que nos hemos estado planteando. Todavía estamos tratando de obtener respuestas completas a esta pregunta de las agencias gubernamentales que han establecido las restricciones de visitas y hemos estado hablando con la agencia federal que supervisa los hogares de ancianos, los Centros de Servicios de Medicare y Medicaid. Y han indicado que revisarán la guía de visitas y posiblemente lo harán ahora que se distribuyen las vacunas. Pero no sabemos cuándo ni cómo será.

 

Continuamos abogando ante el Gobierno federal, con los legisladores y estamos trabajando con socios como AARP para establecer visitas seguras en las instalaciones lo antes posible, porque sabemos que los residentes y las familias están extremadamente frustrados por la prohibición actual. Quieren reunirse con sus seres queridos. Y también sabemos que las familias brindan mucho apoyo y cuidado a los miembros de la familia residentes que viven en centros de atención a largo plazo, porque demasiados centros no tienen suficiente personal disponible a diario para brindar atención. Ese ha sido un factor realmente importante.

 

Pero mientras tanto, en este momento, los centros de atención a largo plazo deben hacer todo lo posible para garantizar que se implementen las prácticas adecuadas de control de infecciones, que estén evaluando continuamente cómo pueden ofrecer visitas seguras, incluso ahora mismo, entre residentes y familias y deben trabajar para satisfacer las necesidades de cada residente. Muchas familias califican para visitas de cuidado esencial o visitas de cuidado compasivo. Y el objetivo es lograr que la mayor cantidad de miembros de la familia regresen lo antes posible y que se levanten las restricciones lo antes posible.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias, Lori. Y nuevamente, oyentes, no tengan vergüenza de acercarse a los hogares de ancianos y las instalaciones de vida asistida donde residen sus seres queridos y hacerles preguntas difíciles. Quiero repetir un excelente recurso que AARP creó sobre lo que sucede dentro de los hogares de ancianos. Eso es www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Ve allí para obtener información sobre las tasas de infección en los hogares de ancianos donde residen tus seres queridos, las precauciones que se están tomando. Pero por supuesto, si tienes preguntas, levanta el teléfono y llámalos y defiende a tus seres queridos. Muchas gracias, Lori. Y gracias a todos nuestros invitados.

 

Pronto llegaremos a más preguntas de los oyentes. Pero quería dar una actualización rápida de alerta de la Red contra el Fraude, de AARP. A medida que continúa el lanzamiento de la vacuna contra el coronavirus, los estafadores buscan formas de aprovecharse. Están llamando, enviando correos electrónicos y mensajes de texto, y colocando anuncios falsos para convencer a las personas de que pueden saltar al frente de la cola de vacunas por una tarifa, o proporcionando su número de seguro social u otra información personal confidencial.

 

Sepan que cualquier oferta para saltarse la cola de vacunas es una estafa. Siempre recurran a recursos confiables, como tu médico o el departamento de salud local, para obtener orientación sobre la distribución de la vacuna. Visita www.aarp.org/fraude. Eso es www.aarp.org/fraude, para obtener más información sobre estas y otras estafas. O puede llamar a nuestra línea de ayuda de La Red contra el Fraude al 877-908-3360.

 

Ahora es el momento de abordar más preguntas con el Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka y Clarence Anthony. Como recordatorio, presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono en cualquier momento para comunicarte con un miembro del personal de AARP y entrar en la cola para hacer esa pregunta en vivo. Jean, ¿a quién tenemos en la línea ahora?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestro próximo interlocutor es Paul de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Paul. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Paul: Gracias. Sí, gracias por atender mi llamada. Tengo 71 años. Todavía no me han vacunado, pero ciertamente estoy deseando hacerlo. Y me preguntaba si después de la vacunación, ¿tendré que seguir usando una mascarilla? ¿Y todavía tendré que evitar las reuniones, como las reuniones familiares, incluso si todos los asistentes han sido vacunados o han tenido COVID?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Dr. Johnson, creo que ya hemos tocado este tema antes. ¿Podrías reiterar tu guía para Paul y para otras personas que se estaban preguntando sobre eso?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por tu pregunta, Paul. No sabemos con precisión quiénes son los subgrupos que no están protegidos con la vacuna, primero. Número dos, no estamos seguros de cuánto dura la protección. Y número tres, no estamos seguros de si la vacuna previene la enfermedad y aún permite la infección. Creo que lo que recomendaría, de hecho, escuché al Dr. Fauci anoche en la televisión hablar de eso, es que la disponibilidad de la vacuna y recibir la vacuna en este momento no debería alterar las otras medidas preventivas que estamos tomando.

 

No aflojaría ninguna de las estrategias que ha utilizado hasta ahora para evitar la COVID-19. Ahora, dentro de 6 meses, o dentro de 12 meses, cuando sepamos un poco más sobre los efectos de la vacuna y conozcamos el estado de la pandemia, es posible que tengamos otros consejos. Pero ciertamente queremos errar a favor de la precaución, que la gente use las mismas medidas.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence, de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, me pregunto si estás viendo ejemplos de alcaldes en todo el país que están dando ese ejemplo de distanciamiento social y uso de mascarillas para las personas que viven en sus jurisdicciones.

 

Clarence Anthony: Campaña [INAUDIBLE], por así decirlo, durante los últimos 10 u 11 meses. Y existe este reconocimiento que es importante tener tu mascarilla, practicar el distanciamiento social y lavarse las manos. Y creo que algunos han sido atrapados sin hacerlo teniendo reuniones familiares y saliendo a cenar. Y lo que ha sido positivo es que la respuesta de la comunidad es que estás diciendo que deberíamos hacer eso, pero no lo estás haciendo. Entonces, creo que los líderes locales están diciendo: "No estamos viajando porque les hemos pedido que no viajen. Les hemos pedido que se pongan las mascarillas". Y creo que ha sido un cambio de comportamiento positivo al modelar eso con sus residentes.

 

Una de las cosas que también quiero mencionar aquí es que creo que, a medida que las personas que llaman escuchan, nuestras comunidades rurales, las que son comunidades de 20,000 o más pequeñas, es un área que creo que estamos muy preocupados por asegurarnos de que la información y la distribución de la vacuna llegue a esas ciudades. Y me atrevería a decir que muchas de las personas que llaman son de esas áreas. Y les insto a que vayan a sus departamentos de salud, llamen a su médico, a que sean su propio defensor porque a veces pensamos en Washington D.C., Chicago y otras ciudades importantes. Pero creo que una de las cosas que quiero destacar es que sabemos que están allí en las ciudades rurales más pequeñas, y AARP, la Liga Nacional de Ciudades y otros, queremos trabajar con ustedes para brindarles esta información. Quiero dejar eso en claro también.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, gracias, Clarence. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Ann de Ohio.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Ann. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Ann: Hola. Mientras escuchaba, respondieron a mi pregunta sobre los hogares de ancianos y qué tan pronto podríamos regresar allí. Entonces, me retiraré y dejaré que alguien más continúe.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muy bien.

 

Ann: Gracias.

 

Bill Walsh: Muchas gracias. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada, en realidad voy a sacar una de YouTube. Y tenemos una pregunta de Udah, pido disculpas si lo pronuncio incorrectamente. Pero Udah pregunta: "¿Cuánto tiempo dura la vacuna?"

 

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson, ¿tiene alguna idea sobre eso? No estoy seguro de que tengamos los datos para decirnos eso.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que tal vez una respuesta de tres palabras, no lo sé, sería suficiente. Estos ensayos de vacunas, estos ensayos de vacunas de Fase 3 se iniciaron en julio de 2020, por lo que apenas llevamos 6 meses. Y las personas que han sido parte de estos ensayos de vacunas, muchos de ellos continúan en los ensayos durante dos años o más. Ese es uno de los temas sobre los que debemos aprender. ¿Cuánto dura la protección? ¿Será necesario un refuerzo? Si es necesario un refuerzo, ¿cuándo es el momento? Creo que aprenderemos más sobre eso. Pero no lo sabemos ahora. Creo que la sabiduría convencional es que habría meses de protección. Pero cómo eso se traduciría en años, tendremos que resolverlo cuando lleguemos allí.

 

Bill Walsh: Bien, muchas gracias. Jean, ¿quién es el siguiente en la línea?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Jill de Nueva Jersey.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Jill. Bienvenida al programa. Y sigue adelante con tu pregunta.

 

Jill: Hola. Bueno, la mayor parte de mi pregunta fue respondida. Pero me preocupa mi tío que tiene 82 años. Tiene una cita para el 5 de abril que hizo a principios de enero. A medida que aumente la oferta, los ancianos que no están en residencias de ancianos o de vida asistida o lo que sea, ¿las otras personas subirán en prioridad? Yo supondría.

 

Bill Walsh: En prioridad. ¿Tu tío no se encuentra en una instalación en este momento?

 

Jill: No. Pero tiene muchos problemas médicos. No lo sé. Solo estoy preocupada por él.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. No, comprendo. Dr. Johnson, me pregunto si puede hablar un poco sobre la priorización. Su tío tiene 82 años. Estoy un poco sorprendido de saber que tendrá que esperar hasta el 5 de abril para conseguir una cita.

 

Steven Johnson: Aludí al hecho de que incluso cuando se usa un límite de edad, todavía hay muchas personas por encima de esa edad y, por supuesto, estamos viendo esto como una vacuna universal. Queremos vacunar a todo el mundo, esencialmente. En nuestra situación aquí en Colorado, llevará varias semanas vacunar a las personas mayores de 70 años. Habiendo dicho esto, abril parece estar más lejos de lo que hubiera predicho. Ciertamente espero que aquí en Colorado, inmunicemos a las personas mayores de 70 antes. Creo que con suerte a finales de febrero. Creo que quizás vale la pena hablar con su médico y averiguar cuál es la historia.

 

En cuanto a la otra parte de la pregunta, ciertamente, si hay éxito en aumentar la producción de las vacunas actuales, si existe la autorización de la vacuna AstraZeneca o Johnson & Johnson para que aumente el suministro y mejoramos la logística de administración las vacunas, presumiría que las personas dentro de una determinada prioridad obtendrían cita para vacunarse antes. Ese sería el enfoque ético.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Y mientras el Dr. Johnson hablaba, Jill, de nuestro personal obtuvo información sobre Nueva Jersey. Y en Nueva Jersey, las personas de 65 años o más son elegibles para la vacuna. Una cosa que puedes hacer es consultar la página de la vacuna contra la COVID-19 en Nueva Jersey o llamar a este número gratuito. Es 855-568-0545. Eso es 855-568-0545. Eso es solo para Nueva Jersey, pero tal vez puedan darte información sobre cómo hacer que tu tío ingrese antes. Ciertamente parece ser elegible. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Tenemos otra pregunta procedente de Facebook. Y creo que esto alude a lo que Clarence habló antes, sobre las comunidades rurales. Efren dice: "Un problema que estoy encontrando es que las personas de edad avanzada tienen que viajar muy largas distancias, para esperar mucho tiempo para recibir una vacuna. ¿Hay algo que se pueda hacer para solucionar esto?"

 

Bill Walsh: Clarence, ¿quieres abordar eso? Este es un gran problema, creo, especialmente en las zonas rurales, pero no solo en las zonas rurales. Entrar en una lista de vacunas es una cosa. Llegar a la vacuna es otra muy distinta para las personas.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es así. Y muchas de mis respuestas pueden parecer científicas o profesionales, pero tengo la sensación de que tenemos que pensar en esto de manera lógica. Y una de las cosas que estoy viendo es que las farmacias y las tiendas de comestibles que se están utilizando, a menudo tratamos con comunidades rurales que no tienen esas farmacias o no tienen esa farmacia de alta calidad con renombre. Entonces, lo que tenemos que hacer no es crear resultados o crear planes que no se adapten a las personas reales en las zonas rurales o en los vecindarios que son desiertos alimentarios, que no tienen ese tipo de instalaciones, incluso en las comunidades urbanas.

 

Estamos trabajando con nuestros alcaldes para trabajar con los departamentos de salud y abogar a nivel estatal para colocar sitios de vacunas en esas iglesias, tal vez, si podemos empaquetarlas y refrigerarlas, por supuesto, de manera adecuada, centros comunitarios y si tienen una tienda de comestibles. No tiene que ser un Harris Teeter o, en Florida, de donde soy, un Publix. Podría ser otra tienda de comestibles sin nombre.

 

Solo tenemos que pensar en las personas y nuestra estrategia. Y creo que nuestros alcaldes y concejales defienden a sus residentes y están escuchando. Eso es lo que creo que debemos hacer, es crear planes reales que sean efectivos, porque ahora mismo tenemos escasez. Y cuando hay escasez, no creo que realmente pienses en los que están en ese tipo de comunidades rurales. Y debemos hacerlo.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Y me encanta su sugerencia sobre iglesias, centros comunitarios, tiendas de comestibles, como lugares donde se pueden administrar las vacunas. ¿Qué hay de las clínicas móviles? ¿Sabes algo sobre ellas? Esa parece una forma de llegar a la gente de las zonas rurales.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, hemos escuchado no solo de las clínicas móviles, sino las bibliotecas móviles, porque, de nuevo, algunas de esas comunidades no las tienen en su área. Hemos estado luchando por eso también. Y espero que podamos conseguirlo. Nuevamente, creo que hay estados, Nueva Jersey, Pensilvania y otros, Florida, que tienen escasez. Y tenemos que encontrar una manera de hacerle llegar a aquellos que tienen más dificultades, porque creo que ahora mismo, eso es lo que nos preocupa.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bien, gracias, Clarence. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Grace de Nueva York.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Grace. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Grace: Gracias. Mi pregunta es... aparentemente estuve enferma con el virus en abril. Y en ese momento, le decían a la gente que se quedara en casa si tenías fiebre, y eso hice. Tuve fiebre durante aproximadamente una semana. Estaba enferma. Terminé quedándome en casa durante todo el mes. En ese momento, no me hice la prueba de PCR. Después de eso, hice la prueba de PCR en mayo y fue negativa. En junio, me hice una prueba de serología y fue positiva, diciendo que había estada expuesta.

 

Me han hecho la prueba de PCR un par de veces desde entonces debido a los requisitos previos para algunas pruebas médicas. Todas negativo. Y me hicieron la prueba de anticuerpos el sábado 23 de enero, y dice que todavía doy positivo para anticuerpos. Y entonces, creo que ese es el resultado que queremos obtener de la vacuna. ¿Alguien tiene algún conocimiento a través de un médico? Y me pondré en contacto con mis médicos. Pero, ¿alguien sabe si uno es positivo para los anticuerpos, debería colocarse la vacuna?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede manejar esa pregunta?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esa es una buena pregunta. En primer lugar, creo que los resultados de las pruebas que has mencionado indican que probablemente tuviste COVID-19. Y parece probable que esa enfermedad que tuviste esté relacionada. Por supuesto, no puedes estar segura. Ciertamente, las personas que tienen pruebas de sangre de COVID-19 anterior son candidatos para la vacuna. Y, de hecho, algunas de esas personas fueron incluidas en los ensayos de vacunas. E incluso las personas que tenían análisis de sangre positivos para COVID-19 habían mejorado la protección al recibir la vacuna.

 

Una de las preocupaciones es que la COVID-19, la infección en sí, no necesariamente previene la reinfección. Creemos, a partir de estudios de trabajadores de la salud, etc., que probablemente exista alguna protección después de una infección que dura varios meses más o menos. Pero los CDC han revisado sus pautas y realmente dicen que las personas que han desarrollado COVID-19, siempre que sus síntomas se hayan resuelto y estén fuera del período de cuarentena, deberían ser candidatas para la vacuna. Solo hay un tipo de precaución, y es que si, como parte de su tratamiento, recibe las terapias con anticuerpos, que llamamos anticuerpos monoclonales o plasma convaleciente, se recomienda que espere 90 días porque la preocupación es que esos anticuerpos pueden interferir con la eficacia de la vacuna. Pero según lo que has dicho, me inscribiría en la vacuna y la recibiría tan pronto como esté disponible para ti.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, Dr. Johnson, gracias por esa respuesta. Y Grace, gracias por esa llamada. Jean, déjame recordarles a nuestros oyentes, en realidad. Si deseas hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en tu teléfono en cualquier momento para ingresar a la cola. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestro próximo interlocutor es Arvin de Nueva Jersey.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Arvin. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Arvin: Mi pregunta es, ¿las personas que reciben la primera vacuna y no pueden recibir la segunda porque no está disponible, tuvieron que volver a recibir la primera vacuna nuevamente para obtener la segunda?

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una pregunta interesante. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede abordar eso? Me pregunto si esto se está convirtiendo en algo común en todo el país. Que la gente ha recibido la primera vacuna, pero debido a la escasez o lo que sea, no ha recibido la segunda. Supongo que aquí hay dos preguntas. Una es, ¿en qué momento debería regresar y, supongo, volver a recibir una primera dosis? Y segundo, ¿tienes que recibir la misma vacuna? ¿O puedes conseguir una diferente?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esta ha sido una historia en desarrollo. Los Centros para el Control de Enfermedades tienen un comité llamado Comité Asesor sobre Prácticas de Inmunización, y ese es realmente el organismo nacional que proporciona recomendaciones sobre vacunas. Y ciertamente, desde el principio, hubo recomendaciones de que no se deben intercambiar las vacunas, y se deben recibir las vacunas en los intervalos exactos que se recomiendan, que son tres semanas de diferencia para la vacuna de Pfizer y cuatro semanas para la vacuna de Moderna.

 

Ha habido un poco de relajación en la última guía de este organismo de vacunación de que la segunda dosis se puede administrar hasta seis semanas después de la primera dosis, y que si la segunda dosis del fabricante no está disponible, se puede administrar la segunda dosis del otro fabricante. Hay un poco más de flexibilidad. Creo que es realmente importante, en términos de nuestra distribución de vacunas a nivel nacional, minimizar este tipo de situaciones. Pero esas son un par de adaptaciones que se enumeran en las recomendaciones de la vacuna, para que las personas puedan recibir esa segunda dosis y obtener esa protección.

 

Bill Walsh: Ahora, si estás fuera de esa ventana de seis semanas, a la pregunta de Arvin, ¿qué debes hacer? ¿Debería verlo como si la dosis inicial ya no fuera válida y volver a la fila para recibir una primera dosis?

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, esa es una pregunta para la que no sé la respuesta porque no creo que realmente la haya. En el tipo actual de clasificación de vacunas en el que estamos, creo que la probabilidad de recibir tres dosis de vacuna en el futuro previsible parece poco probable. Creo que probablemente vamos a tener algunas situaciones en las que alguien reciba una segunda dosis de vacuna fuera de la ventana que recomendamos. Y creo que los CDC lo reconocen. Por lo tanto, creo que una segunda dosis en cualquier momento probablemente se reconocerá como una segunda dosis.

 

Como una especie de fenómeno relacionado, necesitamos aprender cómo sabemos que las personas están realmente protegidas. ¿Hay análisis de sangre que podamos hacer? Entonces, especialmente para las personas que reciben la vacuna en un tiempo poco ortodoxo, o las personas cuyo sistema inmunitario está debilitado, ¿cómo podemos determinar que han desarrollado una respuesta adecuada a las vacunas? Pero sospecho que esta guía seguirá evolucionando a medida que más y más personas se involucren en este tipo de situaciones.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien, Dr. Johnson. Muchas gracias por eso. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Tenemos otra pregunta procedente de Facebook de Nene. Y ella pregunta: "Hay tantos rumores sobre lo que hay en la vacuna y que causa muertes. ¿Cómo puedo estar segura de que no estoy en peligro de esto?"

 

Bill Walsh: Hm. Dr. Johnson, ¿qué hay de la información errónea sobre el contenido de la vacuna y el daño que podría causar?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que parte de la preocupación es el hecho de que las dos vacunas que están disponibles son una tecnología relativamente nueva, este ARN mensajero, que es un nuevo tipo de vacuna. Pero realmente, estas vacunas se han estado estudiando durante muchos años. Y el perfil de seguridad se ve muy bien en este momento. Y en realidad es inusual en la historia de las vacunas que haya algún efecto secundario de una vacuna que no se descubre hasta años después. Y si piensas en el hecho de que cientos de miles, y ahora millones, de personas han recibido la vacuna, todos los días, estamos obteniendo otro millón de días de exposición, y así sucesivamente

 

Me siento cómodo como proveedor de atención médica. Recibí la vacuna y no dudé. Y, por supuesto, cuando hacemos algo en medicina, siempre miramos los beneficios de hacer algo versus los riesgos de no hacer algo. Y el riesgo de no recibir la vacuna y luego desarrollar COVID-19 es realmente una gran preocupación.

 

Bill Walsh: Lori, me pregunto si podrías opinar sobre esto también. Tal vez desde el punto de vista del cuidador familiar, si estás escuchando información diferente o afirmaciones sobre las vacunas, ¿hay buenas fuentes que podrías indicarle a la gente para conocer los hechos?

 

Lori Smetanka: Hemos estado dirigiendo a las personas a los CDC, sin duda, para obtener la información más actualizada sobre las vacunas. Y han estado actualizando y revisando su guía de forma regular. Y creo que tienen un buen conjunto de recursos no solo para los profesionales sino también para los miembros de la familia, los consumidores y la persona promedio que puede necesitar buena información sobre la vacuna y las preguntas que puedan estar relacionadas con ella. Por lo tanto, hemos estado alentando a las personas a que visiten el sitio web de los CDC en www.cdc.gov.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence, ¿qué pasa a nivel local? Hablaste de esto un poco antes, pero ¿puedes reiterar cuáles son las mejores fuentes de información tanto sobre COVID como sobre las vacunas a nivel local?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Voy a respaldar la recomendación del Dr. Johnson sobre la primera, y es ir a tu médico si tienes acceso a un médico, al departamento de salud de tu condado, y luego al ayuntamiento, alcaldes y líderes a nivel local. Realmente tienen mucha información y utilizan diferentes técnicas para intentar conseguir esa información y conseguir acceso. Y es tan importante que tú, nuevamente, te defiendas a ti mismo aquí porque si estás calificado para recibir la vacuna, deberías poder tener acceso a esa vacuna porque se trata de tu salud y se trata de tu vida y tu calidad de vida. Por eso, queremos ser útiles. Por lo tanto, comunícate con tus líderes locales.

 

Bill Walsh: Muchas gracias, Clarence y a todos nuestros... Adelante, Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, estaba leyendo la guía de los CDC y se menciona que si las personas reciben una segunda dosis más de seis semanas después de la primera, no es necesario reiniciar la serie. El consejo es recibir esa segunda dosis. Y desafortunadamente, si se retrasa más allá de cierto punto, todavía se cuenta como una segunda dosis. No es posible reiniciar la vacuna en este momento.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Gracias por esa aclaración. Y gracias a todos nuestros invitados. Estamos cerca del final. Y quería pedirle a cada uno de nuestros tres expertos cualquier pensamiento o recomendación final que nuestros oyentes deberían llevarse de la discusión de hoy. Dr. Johnson, ¿le gustaría ir primero?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí. Solo diría que confíen en la ciencia, confíen en las vacunas, reciban las vacunas lo antes posible. Pero continúen usando las otras medidas de seguridad que sabemos que ayudan a evitar que se contraiga COVID-19.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, muchas gracias. Lori Smetanka, ¿tienes alguna idea o recomendación para terminar?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, absolutamente. Para ustedes y sus seres queridos en centros de atención a largo plazo, manténgase informados sobre lo que está sucediendo en el centro. Hagan muchas preguntas al administrador sobre lo que está sucediendo. Y si necesitan ayuda, comuníquense con su programa de defensor del pueblo de atención a largo plazo para obtener ayuda.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence Anthony, te daré la última palabra.

 

Clarence Anthony: Bueno, lo único que diré es gracias a AARP por esta oportunidad de mejorar esta importante conversación sobre los desafíos y las preguntas que los residentes tienen sobre el acceso a la vacuna. Y solo quiero decir, como dijo el Dr. Johnson, crean en la ciencia, defiéndanse y asegúrense de tener acceso a la vacuna porque se trata de la calidad de vida que te gustaría tener. Y los alcaldes y concejales de sus ciudades son socios. Y gracias de nuevo por invitarnos.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y gracias a cada uno de nuestros invitados por estar hoy en el panel. Ha sido una discusión realmente informativa. Y gracias a nuestros socios, voluntarios y oyentes de AARP por participar hoy. AARP, una organización de membresía sin fines de lucro y no partidista, ha estado trabajando para promover la salud y el bienestar de los adultos mayores en el país durante más de 60 años. Frente a esta crisis, estamos brindando información y recursos para ayudar a los adultos mayores, y a quienes los cuidan, a protegerse del virus, prevenir su propagación a otros, mientras se cuidan.

 

Todos los recursos a los que hicimos referencia hoy, incluida una grabación del evento de preguntas y respuestas de hoy, se podrán encontrar en www.aarp.org/coronavirus a partir de mañana, 29 de enero. Una vez más, esa dirección web es www.aarp.org/coronavirus. Ve allí si tu pregunta no fue respondida y encontrarás las últimas actualizaciones, así como información creada específicamente para adultos mayores y cuidadores familiares.

 

Esperamos que hayas aprendido algo que pueda ayudarte a ti y a tus seres queridos a mantenerse saludables. Sintoniza esta noche a las 7:00 p.m., hora del este, para un evento especial en vivo, Un mundo virtual aguarda, donde exploraremos recursos para ayudarte a aprender, crecer y desarrollar nuevas habilidades para cuidar tu mente, cuerpo y salud durante la pandemia. Gracias y que tengan un buen día.

 

Con esto concluye nuestra llamada.

 

 

1 p.m. ET – Vaccine Distribution and Protecting Yourself

This live Q&A event focused on the latest vaccine information, including updates on candidates and the current distribution process, with a particular emphasis on nursing homes and long-term care facilities. The experts also addressed how communities and local governments are responding and assisting in distribution. Watch a replay of the live event above.

Meet the experts:

  • Steven C. Johnson, M.D.
    Professor of Medicine,
    Division of Infectious Diseases,
    University of Colorado School of Medicine,
    Anschutz Medical Campus Multidisciplinary Center on Aging 

  • Lori Smetanka
    Executive Director,
    National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care 

  • Clarence Anthony
    Chief Executive Officer,
    National League of Cities 

Tele-Town Hall 7 PM 012821 A Virtual World Awaits

Jason Young: Hello everyone. I am Jason Young, senior vice president of AARP External Relations. On behalf of AARP, I want to welcome you to this special live event. AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that has been working to promote the health and well-being of older Americans for more than 60 years. This conversation is going to be a how-to manual on exploring the digital world. Tonight, we are going to focus on how a virtual world awaits you and how you can find fun, community and connections in this pandemic. There’s online content out there that maybe you don’t know about that could help you learn new skills, discover new communities, and cope with the disconnection that we’ve all been feeling. It may not be as good as a hug from your loved one, but it helps tremendously to know that we’re going to get through this together. We’re here to help you find fun, community and connections, and we’ll also be talking about taking care of your mind, body and health, and how you can help your loved ones. Tonight, we’ll have a conversation with some amazing guests: Dr. Andrea Bonior, a clinical psychologist and best-selling author; and Jo Ann Allen, a journalist, writer and podcaster. And by the way, if you’ve heard about podcasts, but you don’t know what they are or how to find one that will interest you, we’ll be covering that tonight as well. And later we’ll hear from AARP’s Heather Nawrocki, vice president of Fun and Fulfillment, who will let us know what resources are out there to help you stay connected.

If you’ve participated in one of AARP’s live events, you know that you can ask questions live on the phone, or you can add them to the comment section where you’re watching. So if you’re joining us on the phone and would like to ask a question, please press *3 on your telephone keypad to be connected with an AARP staff member who will note your name and question and place you in a queue to ask that question live. If you’re watching on Facebook, YouTube or aarp.org, you can post your questions in the comment section. If you would like to listen to this telephone in Spanish, press *0 on your telephone keypad now.

We will be sharing your questions regardless of how you’re participating. This event is also being recorded, and you can access to the recording at aarp.org/coronavirus 24 hours after this call is over. We’ll also be joined by AARP Senior Vice President Jean Setzfand, who will help take your calls. And now I’m excited to introduce our special guests.

So [Andrea] Bonior is a licensed clinical psychologist and author of the new book, Detox Your Thoughts: Quit Negative Self-Talk for Good and Discover the Life You’ve Always Wanted. She was the longtime voice behind the Baggage Check, a mental health advice column in the Washington Post. She now appears as Ask Dr. Andrea, and she is frequently a media commentator on mental health issues. She has appeared regularly as a psychologist contributor on CNN’s The Lead with Jake Tapper, and also serves on the faculty of Georgetown University, where she was recently awarded the National Excellence in Teaching Award, given by the Society for Teaching of Psychology, the Division of the American Psychological Association.

Andrea Bonior: Hi, it’s lovely to be here tonight.

Jason Young: And we want to welcome Jo Ann Allen, who has spent more than 40 years as a news anchor, interviewer and producer at a variety of public radio stations — WNYC, WHYY, KPBS, and currently the NPR affiliate in Colorado, Colorado Public Radio. She’s the host of the podcast Been There Done That, which tells the real-life stories by and for the baby boom generation, and she’s cohost of a recent episode with the Death, Sex and Money podcast about life after 60, a show called “Getting Real About Getting Older.”

Jo Ann Allen: Hey, Jason. Thanks for inviting me.

Jason Young: Thank you both for joining us. We’ve heard from so many AARP members about how they’re caring for loved ones, trying to take care of themselves and approaching this new year 2021 differently. And Dr. Bonior, as I just mentioned, you came out with a new book in the middle of the pandemic about anxiety called Detox Your Thoughts. What does your book have to say about how we can cope, how our loved ones are caring and dealing with anxiety, and all those many things that are on our minds these days?

Andrea Bonior: I mean, who would have thought when I was writing the book that it would come out in, honestly, one of the most anxious times in recent American memory, I truly believe. And I think the first thing that we have to recognize is that our bodies have felt under threat … the anxiety’s a normal response. It can even be functional. So we don’t want to automatically be stressed about being stressed, but we want to teach ourselves how to manage the anxiety in functional ways. And, and first that starts with your body. We need to protect our sleep. Everyone knows this, but they don’t necessarily do it. And we really, absolutely feel worse mentally when we haven’t slept. We are trained through evolution to view the world as more scary and more threatening when we are under-slept because it means that we’re a little weaker. We’ve got to get outdoor time when we can, even if it’s just opening a window and letting some sunshine in or some fresh air, of course do it safely, but we know that has a measurable effect on mood — bringing in plants, doing anything to connect with nature. Moving our bodies to whatever extent we can, even if it’s just, you know, stretching our neck while sitting in a chair, doing whatever kind of bodily movement we can. But the key thing that I think is really revolutionary in some of the mental health research, is really about how we relate to our anxious thoughts. And we need to start relating to our thoughts in a different way. We need to start observing our thoughts in a curious and gentle way. So many of us try to fight our anxious thoughts, or we say, “Oh, why am I thinking that?” “Oh, I’m such a negative person.” “Oh, what’s wrong with me?” One skill that we can really learn is to label our thoughts as thoughts. So instead of, This is never going to get better, to train our brains to say, I’m having this thought that this is never going to get better. And this helps us recognize that the thought is not necessarily true, that it’s not necessarily part of us, and that we can actually watch it pass. And you can watch it pass while you do some breathing exercises, you can pay attention to where you feel that anxiety in your body, you can even play games with labeling your thoughts —like visualizing it as a balloon that you’re going to let go of. And so learning to view your anxious thoughts, not as something that is wrong with you or that’s a threat or something that you have to avoid or push away, but rather as something that you can listen to and let pass and label as an anxious thought process that’s just an unreliable narrator; it’s my anxious voice, it’s not telling me a true story right now. That’s one of the key ways that we can get in and day and day out through our anxiety, which again is kind of normal during this time.

Jason Young: I think those are really great tips and I sure appreciate it. We’re starting to get some calls. … Our focus tonight is connecting virtually. We’re thinking about mental health and those social connections and how to fend off social isolation, in particular. We did a show earlier today, at 1 p.m. ET, and I’ll actually play an excerpt, because I think it will help some folks, that specifically talk about the vaccine. But tonight we’re focused on connecting virtually and about mental health and taking care of each other and those that we really love. So thank you, Dr. Bonior. And it’s great news that we can change the way we think because sometimes our perception is probably what matters most. So speaking of a virtual world and new experiences, Jo Ann, I’m just wondering if maybe you can quickly tell us what are podcasts — in your mind, how are they different from listening to the radio? You’ve done both. But a lot of older folks might be wondering, what is a podcast? Where do they find one, that sort of thing.

Jo Ann Allen: Podcasts are essentially audio on demand. You know how you can go to your Netflix site, or Hulu, or some video place where you can see videos, but … it’s not dependent on your tuning in at a certain time? You can determine when you want to watch those videos. Well, podcasts are the same thing only it’s just audio. And so you don’t have to be looking at a schedule on the radio or any other place where you might find a schedule for your radio station to see when is the show going to be on that I want to hear. You can subscribe to a podcast, and I’ll tell you what that is in a moment. You can subscribe to the podcast, download it, and then determine when you want to hear it. You might want to hear it tomorrow morning when you’re lying in bed. You might want to hear it later tonight when you’re taking a bath. So you get to choose when you actually hear it. You listen when you’re ready. It’s different from radio — which I have had a wonderful career in for many, many years —in that, for me as a podcaster, I can get into conversations with people that can go much more in-depth than telling you a two-minute news story. I can get that person to possibly open up in ways that they normally wouldn’t if we were in a more formal setting, say in a radio station studio. And so not only is it, you can use it when you want it, but they tend to also go a lot more in-depth, and there is no time constraint. There are podcasts that are an hour, hour and a half. There are podcasts that are 15, 20 minutes. A lot of news podcasts, in the mornings especially, like to give you that 15 minutes of what’s been happening in terms of your local area or nationally, and give you like maybe two or three quick stories about what has been going on. But with a podcast, I’m going to stretch that conversation out a lot more. I’m going to really get into it, and in that way, it feels more substantial. It feels intimate, it feels like I’m in a community with the person or the guests that I have on my show. So, that’s the two main things … you can hear it when you want, and it gets a little more deeper than you would get on the radio.

Jason Young: I love that. You know, I think I told you before that I’d been binge-listening to you today, and it almost gave me the feeling that I know you because when I listen to the shows that you have done, and you’ve gone so deep, you’ve taken me to these really interesting places. I feel like I’ve been on a journey with you, Jo Ann. We’re going to talk a little bit more about the special episode you just did, but the topics you get into, I just, I feel so connected, and I treasure them, too, because it’s something I can take on my dog walks. You know, I can’t see my friends and family right now the way I want to, but I do see my dog every day for an appointment that we have out in the park. And I get to take podcasts with me, and so it’s good for him, it’s good for me. It’s one of my 2021 resolutions, but I also feel more connected to my world, and that’s a great feeling.

Jo Ann Allen: Oh good. I’m glad.

Jason Young: If you are brand new to podcasts, AARP actually has a resource to help get you started at aarp.org/podcasts — with an S, aarp.org/podcasts. I did promise to play a little bit of the advice we got earlier today about vaccines; as I mentioned, we did a 1 p.m. show. We had on Steven Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and he was asked a really important question. I want to share it with our listeners tonight, and we’ll replay that. But we’re a year into this pandemic, we’re hearing about a more contagious variant of COVID-19. And so we asked him, what do we know, how do we need to adapt our norms, and specifically mask wearing, and then what do we know about the vaccine’s effectiveness against these new variants? Here’s what he had to say.

(1 p.m. town hall excerpt) Steven Johnson: I start with a few basic points, and that is that viruses do mutate; they change. A good example of that is the influenza virus, where we have to reengineer a vaccine each year based on the changes in the strain. But coronaviruses also mutate, and … we’ve recognized new strains since the beginning of the pandemic. But there are some new strains that are concerning. You likely have heard of strains from the United Kingdom, from South Africa and Brazil. What we seem to know most about right now is that they’re more transmissible, and of course, viruses that are more transmissible mean more people will get infected and then you know the consequences of that. Now, in terms of whether the vaccines will be effective, I think the conventional wisdom right now is that they will remain effective. This really underscores the importance of these other measures that we’ve come to rely on in terms of masking and social distancing and so on. It’s really doubly important while we learn about this variants that people don’t let down their guard in terms of these other preventive measures.

Jason Young: So that was important guidance from Steven Johnson, University of Colorado. And I wanted to share that with you. If we don’t stay vigilant and protect ourselves and our loved ones, cases may go up; such a critical point to understand. So listeners, I know you have questions about vaccines, prevention and treatment, and we have regular programming on Thursdays at 1 p.m. ET. We’ll also have rebroadcasts, for example, of that episode today, and for more information about the next program and a wealth of information about vaccine programs in your state, please just go to aarp.org/coronavirus. … Dr. Bonior, many of our struggles are universal and just plain human, but on the other hand, the pandemic has changed us a bit. How do you think the pandemic has changed us?

Andrea Bonior: You know, I think worldwide it really has changed a lot of us immensely. I mean, let’s start with the negatives. There has been so much loss. There have been staggering numbers of losses, and probably for so many listeners tonight, they have been affected by this so seriously. They’ve lost somebody dear to them; they’ve lost a partner; they’ve lost a friend, a parent, a child … I think it’s important that we recognize that loss on a massive scale like this really can change a culture. There are a lot of people that are very hurting. It’s certainly increased loneliness because unfortunately we can’t even engage in the usual rituals to help mourn during a loss. It’s hard to gather. It’s unsafe to be able to travel, to even show up. If you think of all of the typical things that we do as a culture, when there has been hardship, whether they’re natural disasters or attacks, we gather with our neighbors. We eat together. We show up in each other’s homes to help grieve. And I think it’s been such an added cruelty that we haven’t been able to do that; it’s just another layer of loss that we’ve been experiencing. And I think that also adds to anxiety because I work with a lot of people who say: I just am used to now feeling like something bad is going to happen. We have to overthink all of these little decisions that we’ve never had to think about before. Should I go to the grocery store another time this week or is that too risky? Do I need to think about opening up this mail? All of these things are so taxing to our brains to have to always feel under siege, under threat. So I think that has changed us, but I also think that these changes can be temporary. And that with loss can come a sense of meaning and can come a sense of love and being able to value our relationships. And so on the good side, I think if we can bring ourselves to face this hardship in a way that helps us understand how to move through it and gain insight into ourselves, and what our priorities are, we can come back stronger. I do feel like many people are able now to say: I do miss my grandchildren so much; I’m recommitting to how much time I want to spend with them once it’s safe to do so. Or, I do miss my weekly card game with my friends so much; I want to find a way to do that online and also tell them how much they matter to me. And we’re able to see maybe what our values are in terms of what’s important to us in life. So I would like to think we are, as humans, quite a resilient bunch. And if we can just sort of lean in to how difficult this struggle has been, we’re really better able to come out of it and reshape the rest of our lives to reflect the values and what we’ve learned about what matters to us and live in, I think, a little bit of a deeper way because we can let go of some of the stuff that it turns out didn’t matter much at all. And we can hold on more closely to the things that we love and the people that we love.

Jason Young: I just appreciate so much that people are having to turn to virtual connection, this virtual existence. And it’s true both personally and professionally, right? It’s changed the way we work and learn and interact, as you’re saying … and I think especially about the millions of us who are caregivers for loved ones. We’ve been really tested and stretched these days,  and then I think sometimes we sell ourselves short; after a hard day’s work, we don’t give ourselves enough credit about all that we’ve had to adapt to, and all of these new experiences that we’re coping with and technology that we’re learning to use and so on. And then just how our stories are changing. This new chapter of our lives …  my story might seem ordinary to me, but it might seem extraordinary to someone else. And Jo Ann, you have this beautiful ability to bring out people’s stories in your conversations. What is the benefit of sharing your story or hearing someone else share their story?

Jo Ann Allen: I think anytime you converse with people, and you listen to what they have to say, that’s a way to build community, a way to have camaraderie — you know, learn about who they are, learn about how they’re the same as you or how they’re different. Life is a story. No matter where you turn, there are stories everywhere. And having been someone who was a part of news for many, many years, news stories are important, but I think now the individual stories that people are living are vitally important because it teaches others how to maybe get through a certain problem or that what you’re thinking isn’t out of the ordinary, that you’re not alone in feeling what you’re feeling. As we’re staying home more and more, part of my goal as a podcaster is to bring stories to life for people to understand what we’re going through right now. I mean, it’s also for entertaining, too, because podcasts can be entertainment; it’s all not just heavy discussions. But I always find it so important to know and understand what other folks are feeling. It gives me the opportunity to walk in their shoes. It gives them the opportunity to walk in my shoes. So I think it’s just all about us coming together and being together and helping each other and listening to each other. You know, as time has gone on, we just so … well, time has slowed down is what I mean to say; time has slowed down so that we have this chance right now to listen to each other more. And you can do that with podcasting. There are some podcasts that are solely about that. That’s what my podcast, Been There, Done That is about. It’s talking to the baby boom generation, talking to people 60 and older … my generation, about the things that we’ve experienced. So that we can teach a little bit about what we’ve been through, but also feel good about what we’ve been through and feel good about where we are right now. And to just be able to communicate is what I’m trying to do with my podcast.

Jason Young: Well, exactly. It’s such a gift to give to each other, to share our stories, and then to be a good listener. And that’s one of the things that I felt when I was listening, when I was binge-listening to you today, Jo Ann, was just what an absolutely close and careful listener you are, because each question that you asked next had me on the edge of my seat, wondering where this conversation was going. And Dr. Bonior, I have to say, too, over the years I’ve consumed a lot of your advice columns and other things that you’ve done, my favorite being your Facebook Live chats, because, again, they just had me on the edge of my seat, seeing how you were going to interact with people, and you get to hear so many stories from so many people on a daily basis. And often with you, especially, Dr. Bonior, you’ve made me laugh … I think you’ve been at this for more than 15 years, and so you must have heard some funny stories. If laughter’s the best medicine, tell us one of the funny ones that’s come across your desk.

Andrea Bonior: Oh boy. Well, I could definitely tell you some ones that I have personally been responsible for, but, you know, it’s true. I think laughter is so important, even in dark times, because it really helps us physically and mentally, and it helps us connect with each other. One recent thing that comes to mind — and I know we’re talking about the positives of technology today and all the ways that technology can help us build community when we can’t gather in person — but I’ve got to just give a quick story about the perils of technology. And it involves texting, and it involves the autocorrect feature where you’re typing something and then your phone thinks that it’s smarter than you are. So it wants to correct your misspelling into something, or it wants to predict what you were trying to say. And I do a lot of TV segments, and there are certain producers that I have ongoing professional relationships with, and there was a certain producer and … I’m doing everything from home these days, like all of us or most of us. And there was a certain producer who would sort of text me and say, “Hey, we’d love to have you on the show on such and such date. Why don’t you tell us the day before if there are certain mental health topics that seem important to talk about.” So we had gotten in the habit of this producer texting me and say, “Hey, how’s Friday for you?” And I would text back and say, “Hey, OK, Friday’s good.” As usual I’ll be in touch is what I would say, as in, I will send you the topics soon before Friday so we can discuss what you want and what sounds good for me to talk about. Well, this one time, not too long ago, I was texting this producer and instead of “That sounds great, as usual I will be in touch” … because it autocorrected, it said, “That sounds great. As usual, I will be intoxicated.” And I sent this to the producer, basically making it seem that all of these times I’ve been doing this live TV segment from home, that I’d just been drinking throughout. And luckily, this producer had a good sense of humor, too, and I immediately saw what I did, and I corrected it, and we had a good laugh about it, and I confirmed it, you know, I’m not in the habit of being drunk for these segments. But I think it goes to show that there are ways that technology makes things more complicated, but honestly, if we can laugh through it, it was a connecting moment. And it’s been a joke with us ever since. And I think a lot of us navigating technology in new ways for the first time, it’s very intimidating, it’s very scary, we’re going to make mistakes. We’re going to slip up. And if we can just laugh about it and let it go, it actually becomes something that instead of being that embarrassing is something that brought sort of some joy to somebody’s day that I could make an error like that. So I think that’s a pretty good example.

Jason Young: I don’t know you, but I have a huge smile on my face, ‘cause I can see how awkward that moment must have been, and yet how you rolled with the punches, which is another key thing. I think it, to me, laughter just makes the day go a little faster, and for those of you who are listening to us tonight and would maybe like a little laugh yourself, AARP actually did this fun, original feature-length documentary. I couldn’t believe it when we did it. But it was an AARP Studios production called Care to Laugh. And what we did is, we met this comedian, his name is Jesus Trejo, and he’s a rising star in the comedy world. He’s been on the late night TV shows, and he’s really a charming guy. But he’s pursuing his dream at the same time that he’s caring for his aging parents, and there’s real tension because he’s supposed to be at the comedy clubs and rehearsing … but he has these obligations at home. And he weaves together the two worlds seamlessly. And it’s so funny, and it’s so heartwarming. And if you’d like to see Care to Laugh, it’s actually on our site. You can watch it for free, aarp.org/caretolaugh. So aarp.org/caretolaugh, and his situation might resemble a lot of yours.

I want to get to our callers. It’s time to take your questions. And Jean Setzfand is on the line, as usual, to help facilitate your call. Welcome, Jean.

Jean Setzfand: Thanks so much, Jason, delighted to be here. We have quite a few callers, so we’re going to turn right to Marguerite from Maryland. Marguerite, go ahead with your call.

Marguerite: I’ve been staying in the house, wearing my mask when I go out, I’ve been tested twice — negative. And I’m wondering what else can I do to get out and be with people and do things that won’t keep me in the house and away from people.

Jason Young: That’s a great question, and I really sympathize with how you must be feeling, Marguerite. We’re going to have tips for you all night, so keep listening, but Dr. Bonior, do you want to give Marguerite some ideas?

Andrea Bonior: Sure. And first let me say thank you for doing what you can. I think we don’t say that enough …that the people who are following the guidelines are making a ton of sacrifices, but they’re helping all of us, even though it’s so, so hard. So the first thing I would say is, think about the actual people that you might want to connect with, because that’s a good place to start. Because that will help you figure out: OK, maybe I need some more old-fashioned phone calls in my life; or maybe there’s somebody in my neighborhood that we can both mask up and be totally distant, but we can have a conversation across our yards, or we can go for a walk together in a safe distance and masked way that we both feel comfortable with; or maybe there’s a family member that I don’t usually talk to over the phone, but we like the same movies and maybe we’ll decide to watch a movie together at the same time and then have a conversation about it afterward; or using any of the ways that technology can be helpful — from playing Scrabble with somebody online or there are a lot of different board games that you can play online versions. So I would start by thinking if there are particular people in your life that you would want to connect with — that’s always a great way to start. But otherwise, I think it is a matter of getting that sunshine, and we don’t always have to be outside in order to get some of the benefits of being outside. So think about if you can open more windows sometimes and let more sunshine in; think about bringing in some greenery, maybe having some plants or some flowers — you can actually order some seeds online and start growing them. If it does feel safe to interact more in the neighborhood, you can see a lot of neighborhoods have listserves — and what those are, are everybody signs up on email and they get a notice or an email anytime somebody wants to talk about a neighborhood issue … in my neighborhood, for instance, there are some groups that form and some of them are meeting online. People who like to knit are meeting online together and sharing what they’re knitting, or prepandemic there were walking groups or gardening clubs. So it is a matter of thinking about your interests, too. And those are the two main spheres I would start with: Who are the people that I want more interaction with, and then secondly, are there any particular interests that I have, whether it’s gardening or something like that, that can help me get a little bit more outdoor time.

Jason Young: Thanks for that, and I just have to say quickly, sometimes your friend network can feel like it’s getting a little thin, especially if you’ve lost some people. And so we’ll talk about it in a little while, but AARP even has some volunteers that would love to connect with you. We’ll tell you about the Friendly Voice Program that we have. Jean, let’s go back to the line. Who do we have?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Eleanor from Illinois.

Eleanor: My question — as you talk about using the things that you have, what’s required of me, if I’m to be able to use, or get copies of, whatever it is — I mean, does everyone have to have a computer, do they have to have that? You know, you say do these things, but there comes that time that like, how do I go about getting that? And that a lot of us don’t use computers well.

Jason Young: That’s a great question. Let’s bring Jo Ann into the conversation, because I think podcasts are available on phones and computers, but then there’s also a traditional radio. Jo Ann, what do you think?

Jo Ann Allen: There is obviously traditional radio, but you can download podcasts onto your mobile phone, and the way to do that — it’s a little difficult to explain right now, but if you have someone younger in your life, Eleanor, who could help you to navigate some of the technology that you’d have to learn. And it’s minimal. Don’t be afraid. It’s minimal. Too many people can do it for you to say to yourself, oh, I can’t do that. You just need to be shown how to do it. Because keep in mind, all of the young folks who are just using technology like it’s the back of their hand, they had to learn it at some point. So it’s not just something that they can learn. It’s something that we all can learn, and it might take you a little bit longer to catch on, but I can guarantee you that you can figure out the technology with the help of someone to either download onto your computer or download onto your smartphone. I can guarantee you that once you have that added possibility of being able to listen to podcasts, because there are millions of them. And it’s not just a few, there are all kinds of podcasts out there. And I’m pretty sure you’ll find something that is of interest to you. So what you have to do, number one, is think about the things you like to hear and listen to, or things you want to learn — cooking, sports, whatever it is — and then ask someone who knows the technology to show you how to do it. My mom always said that you can do this because too many other people can do it as well. It’s not brain surgery. It’s not rocket science. It’s really easy once you get the hang of it. So that would be my advice … to have someone show you how to do it.

Jason Young: I think that’s really good advice. … And I think WNYC, which is one of the podcasting powerhouses in the country, they’re really great. They produce a lot of fantastic shows. They’ll show you how, as well. Let’s take one more call right now. Let’s go back to the line. Jean, who do we have?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is James from Georgia.

Jason Young: Go ahead, James.

James: Hello, good afternoon, or good evening, rather. Thank you for giving me this opportunity to speak. My name is James, and I’m in my late 70s, so therefore I am in that group, but I just want to speak on what the earlier doctor has spoken about before, about when you hear different thoughts in your mind, if I’m getting it correct. I experience that. I hear in my mind, sometime I hear two sides. One side is the positive side, and the other side is a negative side. And it’s like they’re at war with one another, trying to get the main space, get the main … my main feeling. But what I do now is I try to feed the positive side, because I’m not looking for the negative side because it’s not giving me any information that’s going to be good for me. But the positive side, these are some good thoughts — good thoughts that allow me to do some pretty good things. Example one, because you’re not allowed to be around a lot of people, and my wife and I don’t like to go out as much, when I get up in the morning, the first thing that I do after I’ve washed up and cleaned up is go into my walk-in closet, and I get on my knees and I pray there. That’s me, I can’t speak for anyone else. And that’s the way I pray to my God, and then when I leave there, I go to my dining room table and I read the Word. Once I read the Word and speak to my wife, I get in my car and I drive down to a local park where I live, and there’s a beautiful lake there and tables and quite a few things. On beautiful days you get quite a few people come there. And I just sit in my car with the window rolled up sometime, and I observe the people as they walk, talk, and how they approach, how they have communication with each other. I don’t hear what they’re saying, but I can see it. But in doing that, I feel better about myself when I leave there. And so for me, this is my day. This is a part of my day. And now, because of my age, there was other things that I wanted to say, but I can’t think of what it was. So that was my, that was my thoughts for today.

Jason Young: Thanks for sharing that. Dr. Bonior, what do you think?

Andrea Bonior: I love that. I love the ritual that you’ve developed for yourself, but you know, when we sit, and looking at a lake and seeing other people, it really is so good for our mind and body. And what struck me is that you’ve found a way to pause. And I know there’s so much talk about mindfulness these days, and everyone knows that maybe it’s supposed to be good for you, but nobody really knows exactly what it is, but that’s the heart of mindfulness … being willing to pause and to sit and to observe and just be gentle with yourself. And to look at the lake and to watch people passing by, and you see how powerful that is to you. It helps you ground yourself and it helps you feel like there’s something in the world that is special and beautiful, even though it’s an everyday moment. And I loved what you said, too, about the way that you observed your thoughts. That’s part of mindfulness, too, is being able to just observe our thoughts. And you see how the positive and negative want to start fighting with each other, and you mentioned how they can really fight with each other. And I think so many of us do that, and then we get exhausted by the fight, right? So I think it’s so important sometimes to do exactly what you do, which is to say: Is this negative thought, is it accurate? Is it helping me? Is it teaching me anything? Or is it just like the loud drunk guy in the audience that needs to be ignored? And honestly, that’s kind of how a lot of our thoughts are. They’re like the heckler at the comedy club. We can’t make them totally go away. But if we feed them, if we interact with them, if we give them power then they start to take over, whereas what you have done is the opposite. You’ve said, You don’t have anything to teach me, negative thought; these positive thoughts are the ones that I need to feed, that I need to spend time on and energy on. I’m really quite inspired hearing the way that you’ve put those into practice, because both of those aspects — the observing your thoughts and then also creating that ritual where you feel like you’re outside and you’re observing the natural world — both of those are such important parts of mindfulness. I really appreciate you having shared those.

Jason Young: Thank you all for all those great questions. It’s really great to hear from you, and we really do have the best callers and I appreciate it. You know, Maya Angelou once said, “There’s no greater story. There’s no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside of you.” Jo Ann, what do we do if we have a story that we need to share?

Jo Ann Allen: The first thing you do is you give yourself permission to tell that story. You free yourself by writing down your thoughts, or if you have a tape recorder speaking into the microphone, into the tape recorder. You can ramble, you can make grammatical errors; it’s your first, it’s your first bypass, if you will. It’s not the finished product, but what you’re looking to do is to release what you’re holding inside. And it does not have to be done in any kind of perfect manner. We all always edit our thoughts before we say them. We always edit our movements when we’re in public ... don’t do that anymore. Let yourself go, let yourself be free. Write it down, speak it into a tape recorder, speak it into a video camera. Just get out what you’re feeling, thinking, wanting, needing, hoping, all of it. Let it go because it will, you will feel lighter for one thing, and you might just have an idea for a podcast.

Jason Young: Oh, I love that idea. You know, Jo Ann, I was thinking about you because of the special episode you did with Death, Sex and Money. This is the podcast that’s produced by WNYC. As I said, they are just fantastic, and there’s some really great storytelling in this episode because you’re talking to older adults about living through the pandemic. You talked to a woman named Susan who is 70 years old, she’s from Virginia, she has a daughter who’s living abroad, and she can’t see her. And maybe we can play a clip of that right quick.

(podcast clip) Susan: So my daughter lives in New Zealand. And now with the pandemic, we talk at least once a week, but we don’t know when we’re going to see each other again, and even before the pandemic, she said to me at one point, “I just started thinking about how many times we get to be together again.” And I think that’s the kind of thing that you start thinking about at age 70 is, you know, how much time is there left, how many times do I get to do this? If I’m going to do something, I’d better do it now. So that’s very much in my mind.

Jo Ann: It is, it is a hard thing to think about, possibly passing before you get to see important people in your life, especially now during the pandemic.

Susan: Yeah, indeed, yeah, indeed … I mean we, she’s even said to me, I’m not sure I would have made this decision to stay here forever if I’d known. So I’ve had … actually to sort of talk … talk to myself about how my love for her, my relationship with her doesn’t mean that I have to be physically next to her, you know, because there’s so much between us that we can enjoy and benefit from without being physically in the same place. But it’s still sad and hard. ‘Cause there are a lot of things I still want to do.

Jason Young: Wow. Jo Ann, Susan just knocked me off my feet with that insight. I just want to repeat what she said, “There’s so much between us that we can enjoy and benefit from without being physically in the same place.” I think it’s so captivating how Susan had to talk to herself about her love for her daughter and how they can enjoy that relationship, but in new ways. And then you brought that out. So after all those conversations that you had to do in order to put this special episode together, Jo Ann, what did you learn?

Jo Ann Allen: Well, it definitely had confirmed for me that older people have a lot to say. We have a lot of stories. We have a lifetime of stories. I know I keep talking about stories, but stories are my life — but, you know, we are all different, yet the same. And when you get someone talking about where they are, what they want, you get a sense that people can, in fact, heal themselves by letting out what it is that they’re feeling. Now, that doesn’t mean things are going to turn around on a dime, but if you get in touch with your feelings — this is the thing that I found with in doing the Death, Sex and Money episode, is that when people get in touch with their feelings, they can really get a sense of who they are and what they want, and how they can move forward. Because after hours of talking to people and a lot of the tape we obviously could not use, but those people, at the end of all of those conversations I had, I learned things that I had no idea existed, or that people lived that way, but they also saw themselves for who they are, or they found out who they are. And they were happy about that. I don’t think I spoke with anyone who felt like, Oh God, I wish I hadn’t said that; or Ooh, wow, I think that. Oh, no, I don’t want to be thinking that. No, it was a matter of them becoming better acquainted with themselves. And to me, that’s a gift because I love to hear what folks have to say, but I especially love to hear what older people have to say, because it’s through that looking back on time that you can really piece things together, and then come to the conclusion about what you want your life to be. I just say, get those stories out of your body. I mean, tonight, people who are listening right now, and when this show is over, just sit down and write some thoughts — sit down and think about what you’re feeling. And it’s so easy to do right now because we are in the pandemic … you can take this time during the pandemic to become better acquainted with yourself, better acquainted with your spouse, better acquainted with your grandkids; I mean, especially get your grandkids helping you to understand the value that they see in you. And again, there might be a podcast up in there if you really stop to think about the things that are of interest to you, because that’s the most important thing in terms of starting a podcast is have it be something that you really want to do. Don’t start something because, oh, you know, I’m a golfer, so I maybe I’ll start a golfing podcast. No. Think about what you like and enjoy, and then move forward from there. And investigate what it takes to either make a podcast or investigate how you can get to podcasts that will be helpful to you.

Jason Young: I think one of the takeaways is, is just this need to reconnect, to reconnect with ourselves, with each other. I love this idea of reconnecting across generations and some of these stories might even just make for a great phone conversation or a great email. But Dr. Bonior, you recently wrote an article about seven ways to create emotionally fulfilling online interactions — and some really good tips. Can you share those?

Andrea Bonior: Sure. I think the main thing to keep in mind is that online interactions do have limitations. You know, there are ways that they’ll never be quite as good. You can’t pat somebody’s shoulder, or there might be technological glitches that mean that somebody’s voice doesn’t sound exactly the same. But, in general, the more that you can think about recreating what would happen in person, the better. So that involves things like spontaneity, right? One of the beautiful things of meeting in person is that there’s a back and forth in real time that feels spontaneous. And so online, sometimes, if we’re emailing or we’re texting, or we’re trying to do a Zoom with a big group of people, it doesn’t feel as spontaneous. We sort of rehearse … certainly if you’re on social media, like Facebook or something, that’s a big problem. We rehearse what we want to say, and we don’t let ourselves be vulnerable. So I think it’s key when you’re online to think about asking more questions, think about making more interaction. A lot of us online are just sort of doing pronouncements, right? We’re on Facebook and we do a big post, and we don’t really interact. So think about how to let yourself be vulnerable, how to show the pieces of yourself that will actually help you connect with more emotional intimacy. And by that same token, think about community. You know, a lot of people get on social media or they start emailing their grandkids, and that’s great, but also think about the ways that you can use online to actually feel like you’re part of something bigger — things like groups of people that share your interests, doing Google searches for message boards about the type of crafts or photography or cooking or TV shows that you like. And even for community is one way to actually feel more connected rather than just having a couple people that you interact with online. We know there’s something very powerful about feeling part of something even more so than just the relationships themselves. Also thinking about how to use online to help other people. There’s a huge mood boost to come when you feel like you have helped other people, and believe it or not, there are lots of virtual volunteer opportunities that are out there, whether it’s just connecting with somebody who’s lonely or doing some sort of basic fundraising work for a cause that you believe in. Also, while we’re talking online, I do think one way to make sure you’re staying emotionally fulfilled is to know that there are still lower-tech options. I know halfway through the pandemic, a group of friends and I that were always doing Zooms were kind of like, you know what, we can still just call each other on the phone. Maybe we don’t have to be on Zoom today. Don’t forget that the lower-tech options still exist. We don’t want to pin ourselves into a corner because we’re so intent on using online. And finally, understand your limits, like sometimes maybe you’ve just had enough of the computer — and that’s OK. And take time to make the settings work for you. If you’re on Zoom for the first time or any of these videoconferencing things, or you’re FaceTimeing with a grandchild, there are different settings that you can play around with to make you more comfortable. Like some people on Zoom, they don’t want to see their own faces and it makes them nervous to have to look at themselves when they’re talking with a group of friends or family; there’s a way to get your own face off there — even though you’re friends and family can see you, you don’t have to stare at yourself. So play around with the settings to make it work for you and have it truly be a personalized experience. You’re much more likely to be comfortable that way. And so it’s much more likely to be emotionally fulfilling.

Jason Young: I definitely have my low-tech days, so that’s good advice. Listeners, we’re going to share some resources and information with you. I hope you have a pen and paper handy, speaking of low-tech, because you might want to jot some notes and, of course, you can also listen to this episode again, to this show again, if you like. But I want to bring in AARP’s Heather Nawrocki, who’s vice president of Fun and Fulfillment … as we’re discussing the importance of staying connected. Hi, Heather. You’re there, good.

Heather Nawrocki: Hi, I’m here.

Jason Young: Good. We’ve been talking tonight about how social isolation is taking a toll on us all, and you have a sense of that. I mean, so what’s going on with people 50 and older these days, do you think?

Heather Nawrocki: Looking at the current research, we found that two-thirds of adults report experiencing some social isolation and high levels of anxiety since the beginning of the pandemic. And that’s everyone, all adults. But when we look at people 50 and older who’ve experienced social isolation during the pandemic, half have reported feeling less motivated, 4 in 10 report feeling more anxious than usual, and more than a third have felt depressed. And the thing is, is that social isolation and chronic loneliness are serious issues that can really impact someone’s health. So it’s really something that we all need to be aware of, and take steps to feel more connected.

Jason Young: For sure, and so what is AARP doing to help people? You know, we’re all living this together. Everybody on the call tonight feels this isolation. What can we do to connect, learn, and have a little fun?

Heather Nawrocki: AARP has worked really hard to offer help to people during this really difficult time. For instance, AARP’s launched the Friendly Voice program, and this is where anyone over 18 can receive a call and have a friendly ear to listen in and to talk to. People just need to request a call and an AARP volunteer will call them back. Anyone interested in receiving a call should visit aarp.org/friendlyvoice. And I’m also really excited tonight to announce a brand-new online destination called AARP Virtual Community Center. It’s like a bricks-and-mortar, in-person community center — where you can find all sorts of classes and events and experiences, and the people that share your interests — but everything in AARP Virtual Community Center is online. You have a lot of different experiences.

Jason Young: That’s awesome because I have a lot of folks in my life who had either informal or formal places they were going, and they don’t feel like they can go there. And so we have an alternative — wow — and so what can people expect? What kinds of classes or events? What’s going on?

Heather Nawrocki: We actually have nine categories of fun and informative experiences — categories such as caregiving, healthy living, entertainment. And entertainment can be, music or movies. Healthy living, cooking, technology help, safe driving, fraud prevention, and the one — my favorite category … lifelong learning. And that’s where you’re going to find all sorts of different kinds of classes, whether it’s a lecture on culinary history or a talk with a crime investigation expert on cybercrime. There’s so much in lifelong learning that I encourage people to explore. When I look at the calendar for the next two weeks, we have more than 30 events coming up.

Jason Young: Wow, that’s really awesome. I’m going to check it out. I want to mention a couple other things, but Heather, thank you for joining us. And for folks who still have that pen and paper in hand, here are a couple other ideas for you. So AARP has a podcast. It’s called Take on Today. Again, you can go to aarp.org/podcasts with an S, and we actually have a really special guest on this week’s episode. It’s a cohost of Jo Ann’s who worked on this special episode about "Getting Real About Getting Older.” Anna Sale is her name. If you haven’t heard her before, she brings such passion, and she’s going to give her favorite tips on podcasts that you should listen to. She works at WNYC. She actually created the [podcast] Death, Sex and Money, and you’ll really love hearing her. We also recently had on CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Take on Today. And you can listen at your computer or on your phone to this episode about brain health, and he gives you some tips about how to maintain your brain health and dispel some myths. Somebody else fun that we had on was Scott Kelly, the astronaut who lived a year in space. And he talks about how his year living in outer space gave him real insight in how to deal with the feelings of social isolation that he’s having now. And then, we also had on Suze Orman, the financial expert, who gave some really good financial planning advice for anybody who’s thinking about retirement and money issues and all those things that you have to worry about right now. We have three great hosts who do the show, and you’ll love getting to know them. And it’s all for free. So, make sure to check out Take on Today and Death, Sex and Money. And then the other thing I want to tell you about are some specialty newsletters that exist. So everybody’s familiar with traditional newspapers and websites and so on, but there are some really just fun and free weekly newsletters. We have one called The Girlfriend, which is specifically on beauty, health, sex, life, advice. It goes straight to your inbox. It’s over email and you can subscribe at thegirlfriend.com. Or here’s one of my favorites: It’s called The Ethel, and it’s a lifestyle newsletter. It’s actually … inspired by our founder, AARP’s amazing founder, Dr. Ethel Percy Andrus. And so whether you’re in your 50s, 60s, 70s or beyond, there are some great articles and stories related to health and beauty and intimacy and relationships, and all of that. It’s written by women just like you. And it’s at aarpethel.com.

So let’s get back to some other listener questions. Before we do that, I just want to tell you where to find that Virtual Community Center that Heather mentioned. You’ll want to go to aarp.org/virtual-community-center. Or frankly, just go to the AARP homepage and we’ll have a promo about it and take you right to it. But you’re going to love all of the new stuff that’s coming online. Let’s get a couple other callers in here right quick. Jean, who’s on the line?

Jean Setzfand: Our YouTube questioners have been very patient. I want to go to the YouTube question from Adele, who’s asking, “What happens when your thoughts and anxieties take your appetite?”

Jason Young: Great question. Dr. Bonior, what do you think about Adele’s question?

Andrea Bonior: It’s very common, unfortunately. So you’ve got to start small. First, I really recommend breathing exercises for this kind of anxiety because when you’re losing your appetite, it means that basically your peripheral nervous system is just in overdrive. It’s saying there’s a threat. We need to be on guard for the threat. We’re in danger. We don’t have time to eat, and basically digestion stops. So start with some breathing exercises. It’s really important to take really slow inhales through your nose, and you can maybe count to five or 10 as you do this. So slow inhales, and you want to work on really making your belly expand. That’s how you know that you’re getting that oxygen all deeply through your abdomen, rather than just breathing shallowly through the chest, which doesn’t really replenish our oxygen levels. So start with those slow breathing exercises then do a slow exhale through your mouth, and pay attention to the ways that your anxiety is hitting other places of your body, too. Maybe you have a lot of neck tension, maybe doing some exercises where you roll your head side to side; or there’s something called progressive muscle relaxation, where you can tighten your fists and feet and your muscle groups, and then let them relax. It’s really important when you’re losing your appetite to try to start small with helping your body calm down. And the good thing is, it’s kind of a cycle. If you can help your body calm down, your thoughts get a little calmer, too, which in turn helps your body get a little bit less anxious. And so then you get your momentum going in the right direction. But I would also start small in terms of food. So maybe a big meal is too much. Maybe there’s something that sounds good on a small level. If you’re just going to snack throughout the day, that’s OK. The point is to try to get some nutrition in when you can, and to try to start small. And anybody who’s suffering from nausea or loss of appetite, no matter what the reason, can really be benefited by just not being hard on themselves, trying to eat — no matter what it is, if it sounds good, try to get it down in small doses at a time, and just let yourself be kind to yourself so that you’re not forcing yourself to eat something that’s going to backfire and make you feel worse. But it really is time to focus on that breathing and try to get at the anxiety from a physical perspective. That’s one of the most important things to do when you know it’s affecting you so physically, like with appetite, it’s a classic symptom.

Jason Young: Thanks for that question, Adele. And thank you for that really good advice, Dr. Bonior. Let’s take another question. Jean, who do we have?

Jean Setzfand: Our next caller is Carrie from North Carolina.

Jason Young: Go ahead.

Carrie: Hello. My husband is 80 and I’m 76, and I’ve never thanked him publicly for being so persistent and insistent that we get our COVID vaccinations, to receive that first shot last Tuesday. Our second shot is scheduled for Feb. 9. And I’m so thankful for him, for his dedication to me. I have a condition called Parkinson’s disease, so he’s been my caregiver since 2018. And then along came the COVID-19, and he had to be, I mean he has just been so wonderful to me, and I just want to publicly thank him for that. Second, I want to ask, when I came on the line the doctor was in the midst of explaining what a podcast is. So I did not get all of the information about that. If she could just go through some — just a re-explanation of the mechanics of a podcast, and how they may differ from what we’re doing right now.

Jason Young: Sure. First off, Carrie, if I can just say this, that was so beautiful to thank your husband that way. You know, some people say to get a vaccine to protect yourself, but you just inspired me that the best reason to do it is for each other. And that’s just touching and really wonderful that you both did that. And I wish you much health. But Jo Ann, can you answer her other question? How to start listening to podcasts if you’re not sure where to start.

Jo Ann Allen: I want to echo what you said, Jason. Carrie, that’s just beautiful what you had to say about your husband. I mean, wow. That’s very moving. The way to learn about podcasts is — I would start off by, if you use a computer, or if you don’t use a computer, get someone who knows how to use a computer — [to] Google podcasting. And that will take you into a world explaining what podcasting is, which is audio on demand. You have the ability to listen to a podcast whenever you want to. It’s not something that you have to tune into at a certain time in order to hear. They’re portable because you can put it on your computer, or you can put it on your phone. And you have the ability to take a podcast with you wherever you go. If you go for a walk or if you’re sitting at the dining room table and you want to listen to a podcast, it’s available to you right there. So my advice mainly is because being able to explain exactly how you can get to listen to a podcast would take a little bit longer than the time I have here to explain that. I would say Google podcasting and the world will open up to you. And you don’t have to learn how to do this post-haste, meaning do it at your own pace. It’s something that while we are having to stay home because of the pandemic, it’s something that you can look into a little bit each day. And if you do that, over time you will get a sense of where you can get your podcasts, what kind of podcasts you might be interested in — because there are comedy podcasts, there are political issues podcasts, there are news podcasts, there are podcasts with people just sitting down talking to each other. But it’s another medium that you can use that might help you to get through this pandemic. And as I say, ask someone to help you. Usually young people are very excited about podcasting. So if you have kids, grandkids, great-grands, ask them to help you to figure out how to get a podcast, or how to listen to podcasts. And I can guarantee you, you’ll love it because it’s just another way of hearing stories. It’s another way of learning about the world around you. It’s another way of being in the world, being a part of the world. But again, Carrie, what you had to say about your husband was just beautiful. Thank you for that.

Jason Young: And there’s a whole virtual world out there, and I hope at least some of you will go explore it. I’m excited. You have me revved up, Jo Ann. I can’t close without closing with words of optimism. So Jo Ann, I’m going to start with you. Send us off with something we really need to know about.

Jo Ann Allen: You know, Jason, this is just one conversation which I’ve enjoyed having, but I also encourage our listeners to join our “Getting Real About Getting Older” call-in special that will take place next Wednesday, Feb. 3, from 8 till 10 p.m. ET. I will be cohosting the two-hour show with my friend Anna Sale, who is the host of Death, Sex and Money. And our show will be an intergenerational dialogue about the stories and issues raised on the podcast that she and I did. And you can share your thoughts on aging by listening to the show and calling in. Now the program will stream live at WNYC.org, cpr.org, and on the … Death, Sex and Money Facebook page. So we can dialogue even more next Wednesday about podcasting, about intergenerational issues, and about issues facing us as older people. Because I’m 67 years old, and I’m very happy to be 67 years old. But I want to hear from as many older people as possible as we continue our dialogue. I also wanted to say that I think it’s fabulous that AARP has a vice president of Fun and Fulfillment. What a joyous title. That’s great.

Jason Young: Well, I think that job’s filled, but if it ever becomes open, Jo Ann, we’re calling you next. Dr. Bonior, what are your words of optimism before we close for the night?

Andrea Bonior: I think as dark as this past year has been, there’s so much reason for hope. The vaccine news alone and the beautiful tribute that we just heard in terms of people looking out for each other, people caring for each other, and helping each other get vaccinated and keep everyone safe. I want to say that when things seem particularly dark from a mental health standpoint, I like to help people focus on the big and the small, ‘cause often we get stuck in the middle. So zoom out when you’re feeling anxious, try to think of the big picture. What’s the meaning here? What will I take from this experience? How does this connect me with my deeper values and what’s important to me? And then also sometimes zooming into the smaller moments. Sometimes it feels just like too much, and it can be a matter of looking at the steam coming from your cup of tea or just sitting and listening to some music that you like, and it’s been a bad day — but for those three to five minutes, that small moment can sometimes help sustain you to go forward. So I, too, would love it if this conversation didn’t end here. I am online. My website, drandreabonior.com, or detoxyourthoughts.com. I do a lot of other writing. I write for Psychology Today. I’m really passionate about getting mental health tips out there. I’m also on social media. If any of you are on Facebook or the like, you can find me on there. And finally, if you’re really struggling, if you’re interested in hearing more about how there are true practical tips, the same things that I use with my clients in therapy of how to manage anxiety, the book Detox Your Thoughts is available wherever books are sold. If you live in a place like I do, where libraries are still closed and bookstores are sort of really restricted to some extent, you can also order it online. But I would love to continue the conversation with all of you. And I want to say thank you for joining tonight because by making it a priority to care for yourself, you also help care for other people in the community. And I think it’s important we recognize that we’re all connected, and we need to take care of not only each other, but ourselves as well. So thank you for having me.

Jason Young: Thank you both. All of the resources that we referenced today, including a recording of today’s Q&A event, can be found at aarp.org/coronavirus. If you are a family caregiver and need assistance, visit aarp.org/caregiving or call the Family Support Line at (877) 333-5885. Thank you to the AARP members, volunteers and listeners for participating in this discussion. I especially want to thank our very special guests Dr. Andrea Bonior, Jo Ann Allen and Heather Nawrocki for joining us tonight. We have such a long things-to-do list now, from signing up for the Virtual Community Center to being part of the call-in show next Feb. 3 — this upcoming week for about "Getting Real About Getting Older" on WNYC — to checking out Dr. Bonior’s new book, Detox Your Thoughts,  to maybe exploring listening to your first podcast. Please be sure to tune on Thursday, Feb. 11, at 1 p.m. ET for another AARP live event where we’ll have more experts to answer your questions related to vaccines, staying safe, caring for your loved ones and each other. And you can watch at aarp.org/coronavirus. I’m Jason Young. On behalf of AARP, thank you for this special evening together. Good evening. And this concludes our live event. Good night.

 Teleasamblea informativa de coronavirus:

NOS ESPERA UN MUNDO VIRTUAL: BUSCANDO DIVERSIÓN, COMUNIDAD Y CONEXIONES

 

Jason Young: Hola. Soy Jason Young, vicepresidente sénior de relaciones exteriores de AARP. En nombre de AARP, quiero darte la bienvenida a esta actividad especial en vivo. AARP es una organización sin fines de lucro, no partidaria, que ha estado trabajando para fomentar la salud y el bienestar de los adultos mayores durante más de 60 años.

 

Esta conversación va a ser una guía básica para explorar el mundo digital. Esta noche vamos a concentrarnos en el mundo virtual que te espera y cómo puedes buscar comunidad y conexiones en esta pandemia. Hay contenido en línea disponible que quizás no conoces y que podría ayudarte a aprender nuevas habilidades, descubrir nuevas comunidades y lidiar con la desconexión que todos hemos estado sintiendo.

 

Puede que no sea tan bueno como un abrazo de un ser querido, pero ayuda enormemente para saber que estamos sobrellevando esto juntos. Estamos aquí para buscar la diversión, la comunidad y las conexiones y también hablaremos sobre el cuidado de tu mente, tu organismo y tu salud y cómo puedes ayudar a tus seres queridos.

 

Esta noche conversaremos con invitadas maravillosas: la Dra. Andrea Bonior, psicóloga clínica y autora exitosa, y Jo Ann Allen, periodista, escritora y productora de pódcast. Por cierto, si has escuchado sobre los pódcast pero no sabes qué son o cómo encontrar uno que te interese, esta noche también estaremos hablando sobre este tema. Más tarde escucharemos a Heather Nawrocki, vicepresidenta de diversión y satisfacción de AARP, quien nos contará sobre los recursos disponibles para que te mantengas conectado.

 

Si ya has participado en alguna de las actividades en vivo de AARP, sabes que puedes hacer preguntas en vivo, por teléfono o puedes agregarlas en la sección de comentarios desde donde nos estás mirando. Si te unes por teléfono y deseas hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en tu teléfono para conectarte con un representante de AARP que anotará tu nombre y tu pregunta y te colocará en una lista para hacer esa pregunta en vivo. Si nos estás mirando a través de Facebook, YouTube o aarp.org, puedes agregar tus preguntas en la sección de comentarios. Si quieres escuchar esta teleasamblea en español, presiona *0 en tu teléfono ahora.

 

Muy bien, hola, nuevamente. Si acabas de unirte, soy Jason Young. En nombre de AARP, te doy la bienvenida a esta conversación. Estaremos escuchando las preguntas en vivo. Si te unes por teléfono, presiona *3 para hacer una pregunta. Si nos estás mirando en línea, agrega tu pregunta en los comentarios. Compartiremos tus preguntas sin importar cómo estás participando. Esta actividad también está siendo grabada y puedes acceder a la grabación en aarp.org/elcoronavirus 24 horas después de que terminemos. También nos acompañará la vicepresidenta sénior de AARP, Jean Setzfand, quien ayudará a organizar las llamadas.

 

Ahora, estoy emocionado de presentar a nuestras invitadas especiales. La Dra. Bonior es psicóloga clínica autorizada y autora del nuevo libro "Detox Your Thoughts: Quit Negative Self-Talk for Good and Discover the Life You've Always Wanted". Ella fue durante mucho la voz detrás de la columna "Baggage Check Mental Health Advice" en The Washington Post. Ahora aparece como la Dra. Andrea y frecuentemente es comentarista sobre cuestiones de salud mental. Ella ha aparecido a menudo como psicóloga colaboradora en "The Lead with Jake Tapper" de CNN y la Dra. Bonior trabaja en Georgetown University donde recientemente ha sido galardonada con el premio Excelencia Nacional en Educación otorgado por la Sociedad para la Enseñanza de la Psicología, una división de la Asociación Americana de Psicología. Hola, Dra. Bonior.

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Hola, es un placer estar aquí esta noche.

 

Jason Young: Y queremos dar la bienvenida a Jo Ann Allen, quien ha pasado más de 40 años como periodista y presentadora, entrevistadora y productora en una variedad de emisoras públicas de radio: WNYC, WHYY, KPBS y actualmente la filial de NPR en Colorado, Colorado Public Radio. Ella es la presentadora del pódcast "Been There Done That", que cuenta historias de la vida real por y para la generación baby boom y es la coanfitriona de un episodio reciente del pódcast "Death, Sex & Money, About Life After 60", un programa llamado "Getting Real About Getting Older". Bienvenida, Jo Ann.

 

Jo Ann Allen: Hola, Jason. Gracias por invitarme.

 

Jason Young: Bien, gracias a ambas por acompañarnos. Hemos escuchado a muchos socios de AARP sobre su preocupación por sus seres queridos, a la vez que intentan cuidarse a sí mismos y abordan este año nuevo 2021 de manera diferente. Dra. Bonior, como mencioné recién, en el medio de esta pandemia publicaste un libro nuevo sobre la ansiedad llamado "Detox Your Thoughts". ¿Qué dice tu libro sobre cómo podemos lidiar con nuestros seres queridos, la preocupación y afrontar la ansiedad y todas esas cosas que tenemos en nuestras mentes en estos días?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Sí. Es decir, ¿quién hubiera pensado cuando estaba escribiendo el libro que lo publicaría en, honestamente, una de las épocas más ansiosas de los recuerdos norteamericanos recientes? Y creo que lo primero que tenemos que reconocer es que nuestros organismos tienen células en riesgo, la ansiedad como la respuesta normal, que incluso puede ser útil. No queremos agobiarnos automáticamente por estar agobiados, sino que queremos enseñarnos a nosotros mismos cómo manejar la ansiedad de manera útil.

 

Primero, eso empieza con tu organismo. Necesitamos proteger nuestro sueño. Todos lo saben, pero no necesariamente lo hacen. Y en verdad nos sentimos peor mentalmente cuando no hemos dormido. Estamos entrenados mediante la evolución para ver el mundo de manera más aterradora y más amenazante cuando no dormimos, porque eso significa que estamos un poco más débiles. Tenemos que pasar tiempo al aire libre cada vez que podemos, incluso si es simplemente abrir la venta y dejar entrar la luz del sol o un poco de aire fresco, por supuesto, de manera segura, pero sabemos que esto tiene un efecto perceptible en el humor.

 

Poner plantas, hacer cosas relacionadas con la naturaleza, mover nuestro cuerpo hasta donde podemos, incluso si es simplemente para elongar el cuello mientras estamos sentados, hacer cualquier movimiento corporal que podemos, pero algo clave que creo es realmente revolucionario en algunas investigaciones de salud mental se trata sobre cómo nos relacionamos con nuestros pensamientos de ansiedad. Necesitamos comenzar a relacionarnos con nuestros pensamientos de una manera diferente, necesitamos comenzar a observar nuestros pensamientos de una manera amable y curiosa. Muchos de nosotros intentamos combatir nuestros pensamientos de ansiedad o decimos: "¿Por qué estoy pensando eso?", "Soy una persona negativa", "¿Cuál es mi problema?".

 

Una habilidad que podemos aprender es identificar nuestros pensamientos como tales. Entonces, en vez de decir: "Esto nunca va a mejorar", entrenar nuestro cerebro para decir: "Tengo el pensamiento de que esto nunca va a mejorar". Y eso nos ayuda a reconocer que el pensamiento no necesariamente es cierto, que no es necesariamente parte de nosotros y que, de hecho, podemos observarlo pasar.

 

Puedes observarlo pasar mientras haces algunos ejercicios de respiración, puedes prestar atención a dónde sientes esa ansiedad en tu cuerpo, incluso puedes jugar con la identificación de tus pensamientos, como imaginar que es un globo que estás a punto de soltar. Entonces, aprender a ver los pensamientos de ansiedad no como un problema que tienes o una amenaza o algo que tienes que evitar o rechazar, sino como algo que puedes escuchar y dejar pasar e identificar como un proceso de pensamiento de ansiedad. Es solo un narrador en quien no se puede confiar, es mi voz ansiosa, no me está contando algo cierto en este momento. Esa es una de las maneras clave en las que podemos meternos día tras día a través de la ansiedad que es bastante normal durante este período.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, creo que esos son muy buenos consejos y los agradezco realmente. Estamos comenzando a recibir llamadas. A modo de recordatorio a nuestros oyentes esta noche, si quieres participar, simplemente presiona *3 en tu teléfono y puedes hacer preguntas. Esta noche nos concentramos en la conexión virtual. Estamos pensando en la salud mental y en aquellas conexiones sociales y cómo eludir el aislamiento social en particular. Hoy a la 1 p.m., hora del este, hicimos un programa y voy a reproducir un fragmento porque creo que ayudará a algunas personas, ya que habla específicamente sobre la vacuna, pero esta noche estamos concentrados en la conexión virtual y en la salud mental y cuidarnos los unos a los otros y a aquellos a quienes queremos.

 

Gracias, Dra. Bonior. Es una buena noticia que podamos cambiar la manera en la que pensamos porque, a veces, nuestra percepción es probablemente lo que más importa. Hablando del mundo virtual y de las experiencias nuevas, Jo Ann, me pregunto: ¿puedes decirnos rápidamente qué son los pódcast? ¿En qué se diferencian de un programa de radio? Has hecho ambas cosas, pero tal vez mucha gente mayor se pregunta qué es un pódcast, dónde pueden encontrar uno, y esas cosas.

 

Jo Ann Allen: Bueno, los pódcast son básicamente audios a pedido. Ya sabes, puedes ir al sitio web de Netflix o Hulu o algún sitio web de videos donde puedes mirar videos, pero no están… No dependen de que los sintonices en cierto horario. Puedes determinar cuándo quieres mirar esos videos. Bueno, lo mismo ocurre con los pódcast, la diferencia es que solo contienen audio. Entonces, no tienes que estar mirando la programación de la radio o de cualquier otro lugar donde puedes encontrar una programación para tu estación de radio para ver cuándo se emitirá el programa que quiero escuchar. Puedes suscribirte a un pódcast y, ya sabes, te diré qué es eso en un momento. Puedes suscribirte a un pódcast, descargarlo y luego determinar cuándo quieres escucharlo.

 

Quizás lo quieres escuchar mañana mientras estás acostado, quizás lo quieres escuchar esta noche mientras te estás bañando. Puedes escoger cuándo quieres escucharlo. Lo escuchas cuando estás listo. Es diferente a un programa de radio, en donde he tenido una carrera maravillosa durante muchos, muchos años. Es diferente a un programa de radio. Y para mí, que produzco pódcast, puedo tener conversaciones más profundas con la gente que contarte una historia nueva de dos minutos. Puedo hacer que esa persona se sincere de maneras en las que no lo haría normalmente si estuviéramos en un formato normal, digamos en una emisora de radio, en un estudio.

 

No solo puedes usarlo cuando quieres, sino que tiende a ser un poco más profundo y no hay limitación de tiempo. Hay pódcast que duran una hora, hora y media. Hay pódcast que duran 15 o 20 minutos. Muchos pódcast sobre noticias a la mañana te dan un vistazo de 15 minutos sobre lo que ha estado pasando en lo que respecta a tu zona o a nivel nacional y te dicen 2 o 3 historias rápidas sobre lo que ha estado pasando, pero en un pódcast voy a extender mucho más esa conversación, me voy a involucrar. Y de esa manera se siente como algo más significativo, se siente como algo cercano, se siente como si estuviera en una comunidad con la persona o los invitados al programa. Esas son las dos cosas principales: que puedes escucharlo cuando quieres y que es un poco más profundo que lo que escucharías en un programa de radio.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, me encanta. Creo que te dije antes que hoy te he estado escuchando durante todo el día y me dio la sensación de que te conozco, porque cuando escucho los programas que has hecho, has profundizado tanto, me has llevado a lugares interesantes. Siento como si hubiera estado de viaje contigo.

 

Jo Ann, vamos a hablar un poquito más sobre este episodio especial que hiciste, pero con los temas en los que profundizaste me sentí muy unido y además los valoro porque puedo llevarlos conmigo cuando saco a pasear a mi perro. Ya sabes, en este momento no puedo ver a mis amigos o a mi familia tanto como me gustaría, pero sí veo a mi perro todos los días cuando vamos a pasear al parque y puedo llevar los pódcast conmigo. Y eso es bueno para él, es bueno para mí, es uno de mis objetivos para el 2021, pero también me siento más unido a mi mundo, y es un sentimiento increíble.

 

Jo Ann Allen: Qué bueno, me alegro.

 

Jason Young: Si recién empiezas a escuchar pódcast, AARP tiene un recurso que puede ayudarte a comenzar en aarp.org/pódcasts con "S" al final, aarp.org/pódcasts. Prometí que vamos a reproducir un fragmento sobre el consejo en lo que respecta a las vacunas. Como mencioné, hicimos un programa a la 1 p.m. con el Dr. Steven Johnson, profesor de Medicina y la división de Enfermedades Infecciosas en la Facultad de Medicina de University of Colorado. Le hicieron una pregunta muy importante y quiero compartirla con los oyentes esta noche. Reproduciremos ese fragmento, pero hace un año que comenzó la pandemia, estamos escuchando sobre una variante de COVID-19 más contagiosa y por eso le preguntamos: "¿Qué sabemos? ¿Cómo debemos adaptar nuestras normas, en particular, el uso de las mascarillas? ¿Qué sabemos sobre la efectividad de las vacunas para estas nuevas variantes?". Esto es lo que dijo.

 

Steven C. Johnson: Comienzo con algunos conceptos básicos y esto es que los virus mutan, cambian. Un buen ejemplo de eso es el virus de influenza, donde tenemos que volver a diseñar una vacuna todos los años según los cambios en la cepa. Pero los coronavirus también mutan y realmente han… Identificamos nuevas cepas desde el comienzo de la pandemia, pero hay algunas nuevas cepas que son preocupantes, quizás has escuchado hablar sobre las cepas del Reino Unido, de Sudáfrica y de Brasil.

 

Lo que parece que más sabemos en este momento es que son más trasmisibles y, obviamente, que los virus sean más transmisibles significa que más gente se contagiará y además las consecuencias que trae esto. En términos de la efectividad de las vacunas, creo que la creencia generalizada en este momento es que seguirán siendo efectivas, y esto realmente enfatiza la importancia de estas otras medidas de las que hemos dependido en lo que respecta al uso de mascarillas y al distanciamiento social, entre otras. Es sumamente importante, mientras seguimos aprendiendo sobre estas variantes, que la gente no baje la guardia en lo que respecta a las otras medidas de prevención.

 

Jason Young: Eso fue un consejo importante del Dr. Steven Johnson de University of Colorado y quería compartirlo contigo. Si no estamos atentos y no nos protegemos a nosotros mismos y a nuestros seres queridos, los casos pueden subir, algo que es fundamental que comprendamos. Sé que tienes preguntas sobre las vacunas, la prevención y el tratamiento, y tenemos un programa habitual los jueves a la 1 p.m., hora del este. También tenemos retransmisiones, por ejemplo, el programa de hoy. Para obtener más información sobre el programa siguiente y una gran cantidad de información sobre los programas de vacunación en tu estado, visita el sitio web aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Si quieres hacer una pregunta, recuerda presionar *3 en tu teléfono. Si nos estás mirando en línea, escribe la pregunta en la sección de comentarios y la recibiremos.

 

Dra. Bonior, muchas de nuestras luchas son universales y simplemente humanas, pero, por otro lado, la pandemia nos ha cambiado un poquito. ¿Cómo crees que nos ha cambiado la pandemia?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Sí, creo que a nivel mundial nos ha cambiado enormemente a muchos de nosotros. Es decir, comencemos con lo negativo: ha habido mucha pérdida, ha habido un número impactante de pérdidas y, probablemente, muchos de nuestros oyentes han sido afectados gravemente por esta situación. Han perdido a algún ser querido, han perdido a una pareja, han perdido a un amigo, a un padre, a un hijo. Creo que es importante que admitamos que la pérdida a gran escala como esta realmente puede cambiar una cultura. Hay mucha gente que está sufriendo mucho.

 

Esto en verdad aumentó la soledad porque, lamentablemente, ni siquiera podemos participar de las ceremonias usuales para ayudar a guardar el luto durante una pérdida. Es difícil reunirse, no es seguro poder viajar para estar allí, si piensas en todas las cosas que hacemos normalmente como cultura. Cuando hemos tenido dificultades, ya sean desastres naturales o ataques, nos reunimos con nuestros vecinos, comemos juntos, vamos a los hogares de los demás para ayudarlos durante el duelo, y creo que ha sido una crueldad no poder hacer eso.

 

Es simplemente otra pérdida más que hemos estado viviendo. Creo que eso también se suma a la ansiedad porque trabajo con mucha gente que dice: "Ahora estoy acostumbrado a sentir que algo malo va a pasar". Tenemos que pensar demasiado en todas esas pequeñas decisiones en las que antes no teníamos que pensar demasiado. "¿Debo ir a la tienda de comestibles otra vez esta semana o es algo demasiado arriesgado? ¿Necesito pensar en abrir este correo?"

 

Estas cosas son agobiantes para nuestra mente, sentir que estamos amenazados todo el tiempo. Creo que eso nos ha cambiado, pero creo que estos cambios pueden ser temporales y que, con una pérdida, puede llegar un sentimiento de significado y puede llegar un sentimiento de amor y ser capaces de valorar nuestras relaciones. Lo positivo es que creo que si podemos enfrentar esta adversidad en una manera que nos ayuda a entender cómo atravesarla y comprendernos mejor, y cuáles son nuestras prioridades, podemos terminar siendo más fuertes.

 

Siento que mucha gente ahora puede decir: "Extraño mucho a mis nietos, me comprometo con el tiempo que quiero pasar con ellos cuando sea seguro hacerlo", o: "Extraño mucho la partida de cartas semanal con mis amigos, quiero encontrar una manera de hacerlo en línea y también decirles cuán importantes son para mí". Y podemos ver cuáles son nuestros valores en cuanto a lo que es importante en nuestras vidas.

 

Me gustaría pensar que como seres humanos somos un grupo con bastante resiliencia. Y si podemos ir hacia adelante en cuán difícil ha sido esta lucha, somos más capaces de salir de esta situación y reorganizar el resto de nuestra vida para que refleje los valores y lo que hemos aprendido sobre lo que nos importa y vivir de una manera un poco más profunda porque podemos dejar algunas cosas que no eran tan importantes, y podemos aferrarnos más a las cosas que nos gustan y a las personas que queremos.

 

Jason Young: Agradezco mucho que la gente tenga que recurrir a la conexión virtual, a esta existencia virtual. Y es cierto, tanto a nivel personal como a nivel profesional, ¿cierto? Esto ha cambiado la manera en la que trabajamos, aprendemos e interactuamos, como dices, Dra. Bonior, y pienso particularmente en los millones que somos cuidadores de seres queridos, hemos sido puestos a prueba y bajo presión estos días.

 

Y creo que a veces nos subestimamos, después de un día difícil de trabajo no nos damos suficiente mérito sobre lo que hemos tenido que adaptarnos y todas estas nuevas experiencias con las que lidiamos, y la tecnología que estamos aprendiendo a usar, entre otras cosas, y cómo nuestras historias están cambiando este nuevo capítulo en nuestras vidas. Mi historia podría parecerme común, pero podría parecer extraordinaria para otra persona. Jo Ann, tienes esta habilidad increíble de resaltar la historia de la gente en tus conversaciones. ¿Cuál es el beneficio de compartir tu historia o de escuchar a alguien que comparte la suya?

 

Jo Ann Allen: Bueno, creo que cuando conversas con la gente y escuchas lo que la gente tiene para decir, esa es una manera de desarrollar comunidad, una manera de tener camaradería. Aprender quiénes son, aprender de qué manera son semejantes a ti o de qué manera son diferentes. La vida es una historia, sin importar a dónde mires. Hay historias en todas partes. Y al haber sido alguien que formó parte de las noticias durante muchos años, las historias nuevas son importantes.

 

Pero creo ahora que las historias individuales que la gente está viviendo son sumamente importantes porque les enseñan a otros cómo superar cierto problema o que lo que estás pensando es algo normal, que no eres el único que siente eso. Y mientras nos quedamos en casa cada vez más, parte de mi objetivo como productora de pódcast es retratar historias vívidamente para que la gente comprenda lo que estamos atravesando en este momento. Es decir, también es para entretener, porque los pódcast pueden ser entretenidos, no son solo conversaciones intensas, pero siempre encuentro importante saber y comprender qué sienten las otras personas.

 

Me da la oportunidad de estar en sus zapatos, les da la oportunidad de estar en mis zapatos, por eso creo que se trata de unirnos y estar juntos y ayudarnos mutuamente y escucharnos mutuamente. A medida que pasa el tiempo… Lo que quiero decir es que el tiempo se ha desacelerado. Como el tiempo se ha desacelerado, tenemos esta oportunidad para escucharnos más los unos a los otros y puedes hacerlo a través de un pódcast. Es decir, hay pódcast que se tratan solo de eso. Mi pódcast "Been There Done That" se trata sobre eso, le habla a la generación baby boom, le habla a la gente de 60 años o más, mi generación, sobre las cosas que hemos vivido para que podamos enseñar un poquito sobre lo que nosotros hemos atravesado, pero también sentirnos bien sobre lo que hemos atravesado y sentirnos bien sobre donde estamos en este momento, y ser capaces de comunicarnos, eso es lo que intento hacer con mi pódcast.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, exactamente. Es un buen obsequio para darnos los unos a los otros, compartir nuestras historias y también ser un buen oyente. Y esa es una de las cosas que sentí cuando estaba escuchando, cuando estuve escuchándote todo el día. Jo Ann fue una oyente atenta y minuciosa. Cada pregunta que hacías me dejaba al límite, preguntándome hacia dónde iba esa conversación. Dra. Bonior, debo decir también que, con el transcurrir de los años, he tomado muchos de tus consejos y otras cosas que has hecho.

 

Tus conversaciones en vivo en Facebook son mis favoritas porque me dejan al límite viendo cómo interactúas con la gente y cómo escuchas muchas historias de mucha gente todos los días. Y a menudo, particularmente contigo, Dra. Bonior, me has hecho reír con eso. Creo que has estado en esto durante más de 15 años, así que has oído muchas historias graciosas. Si la risa es la mejor medicina, cuéntanos una de las historias graciosas que has escuchado.

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: ¡Cielos! Definitivamente podría contarte algunas de las que he sido responsable directa. Pero, sí, es cierto. Creo que la risa es muy importante, incluso en los períodos más oscuros, porque realmente nos ayuda física y mentalmente, y nos ayuda a conectarnos con los demás. Pero, sí, algo reciente que se me viene a la mente y sé que hoy estamos hablando sobre el lado positivo de la tecnología y todas las maneras en las que nos ayuda a desarrollar comunidad cuando no podemos reunirnos, pero tengo una historia breve sobre los peligros de la tecnología e implica los mensajes de texto y la función de la autocorrección en la que estás escribiendo algo y el teléfono cree que es más inteligente que tú, por lo que quiere corregir tu error ortográfico en alguna palabra o quiere predecir qué estás tratando de decir.

 

Yo hago muchos segmentos de televisión y hay ciertos productores con quienes tengo relaciones profesionales continuas y había un productor… Ya sabes, en estos días estoy trabajando desde casa, como muchos de nosotros. Y había un productor que solía enviarme un mensaje de texto para decir: "Oye, nos gustaría que estés en el programa tal día en tal horario, ¿por qué no nos avisas el día anterior si hay ciertos temas de salud mental que pueden ser importantes para conversar?" Teníamos la costumbre de que este productor me enviaba un mensaje de texto y decía: "Oye, ¿el viernes puedes?" Y yo le respondía y decía: "Sí, el viernes puedo, como siempre, me pondré en contacto", es lo que yo decía, como cuando dices: "Te enviaré los temas antes del viernes, para que podamos hablar sobre lo que quieras y sobre lo que a mí me parece bien hablar".

 

Esta vez, hace poco, estaba escribiendo el mensaje de texto para este productor, y en vez de: "Suena bien, como siempre, me pondré en contacto", escribí, porque la autocorrección lo modificó: "Suena bien, como siempre, me pondré en embriaguez". Y le envié ese mensaje al productor donde básicamente parecía que en todo este tiempo que yo había estado haciendo los segmentos en vivo había estado bebiendo.

 

Afortunadamente, este productor también tenía un buen sentido del humor. Vi inmediatamente lo que había hecho así que lo corregí, y los dos nos reímos por eso. Y confirmo que no tengo el hábito de estar ebria durante estos segmentos. Pero creo que esto demuestra que hay maneras en las que la tecnología complica más las cosas, pero, honestamente, si nos podemos reír por esa situación, fue un momento de conexión. Y lo hemos tomado con una broma entre nosotros desde que sucedió.

 

Creo que muchos de nosotros nos estamos haciendo camino en la tecnología de nuevas maneras o por primera vez, y es muy intimidante, muy aterrador. Vamos a cometer errores, y si podemos reírnos por esa situación y dejarla pasar, de hecho, se convierte en algo que, lejos de ser incómodo, es algo que nos trajo un poco de alegría. Alguien dijo que podría cometer un error como ese. Por eso creo que ese es un buen ejemplo.

 

Jason Young: No sé tú, pero yo estoy sonriendo porque puedo ver cuán incómodo habrá sido ese momento, y aun así aprendiste a los golpes, que es algo clave. Creo que la risa hace que el día pase más rápido. Y para aquellos que nos están escuchando esta noche y que quizás quieran reírse un poco, AARP hizo un largometraje divertido y original, no podía creerlo cuando lo hicimos, pero fue una producción de AARP Studio llamada "CARE TO LAUGH".

 

Lo que hicimos fue, conocimos a este comediante llamado Jesus Trejo, quien es una estrella en ascenso en el mundo de la comedia. Ha estado en los programas nocturnos de televisión y es un chico encantador, pero está siguiendo su sueño a la vez que cuida a sus padres mayores. Entonces, la tensión es real, ¿cierto? Porque se supone que debe estar en los clubes de comedia y ensayando, pero tiene estas obligaciones en su hogar. Y él entrelaza estos dos mundos ininterrumpidamente, y es muy gracioso y reconfortante. Si quieres ver "CARE TO LAUGH", de hecho, está en nuestro sitio web, puedes verlo de manera gratuita, aarp.org/caretolaugh, aarp.org/caretolaugh.

 

Su situación puede ser parecida a la de muchos de ustedes. Por eso quiero escuchar a nuestros oyentes. Es momento de escuchar sus preguntas y Jean Setzfand está en la línea, como siempre, para ayudar a organizar las llamadas. Bienvenida, Jean.

 

Jean Setzfand: Muchas gracias, Jason, es un placer estar aquí. Muy bien, tenemos bastantes llamados. Vamos a hablar enseguida con Marguerite de Maryland.

 

Jean Setzfand: Marguerite, procede con tu llamada.

 

Jason Young: Hola, Marguerite.

 

Marguerite: Me he estado quedando en casa, usando la mascarilla cuando salgo. Me han hecho la prueba dos veces y han dado negativo, y me pregunto: ¿Qué más puedo hacer para salir y estar con la gente y hacer cosas que no me mantengan en casa y lejos de la gente?

 

Jason Young: Esa es buena pregunta. Realmente comprendo cómo debes sentirte, Marguerite. Vamos a tener consejos para ti esta noche, así que sigue escuchando el programa. Dra. Bonior, ¿quieres darle algunas ideas a Marguerite?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Claro. Primero, permíteme agradecerte por hacer lo que puedes. Creo que no decimos lo suficiente que la gente que está siguiendo los consejos está haciendo muchos sacrificios, pero nos están ayudando a todos, aunque es realmente muy difícil. Lo primero que diría es que pienses en la gente con la que te quieres conectar, porque ese es un buen lugar para comenzar. Eso te ayudará a descubrir: "Bueno, quizás necesito más llamadas tradicionales en mi vida, o quizás hay alguien en mi vecindario con quien, mediante el uso de mascarillas y manteniendo la distancia, podamos conversar en nuestros jardines, o podamos ir a caminar juntos manteniendo distancia y usando mascarillas de una manera en la que ambos estemos cómodos.

 

O quizás hay un familiar con quien usualmente no hablo por teléfono, pero nos gustan las mismas películas, y quizás decidamos ver una película al mismo tiempo y luego podamos conversar sobre la película". O usar alguna de las maneras en las que la tecnología puede ser útil, desde jugar Scrabble con alguien en línea, hay un montón de juegos de mesa que puedes jugar en línea. Yo comenzaría por pensar si hay personas particulares en tu vida con quienes te gustaría conectarte, esa siempre es una buena manera de empezar.

 

Aparte de eso, creo que es una cuestión de tomar un poco de sol, y no siempre tenemos que estar afuera para obtener los beneficios de estar afuera. Piensa si a veces puedes abrir más ventanas y dejar que entre más luz solar, piensa en tener más vegetación, tal vez tener algunas plantas o flores. Puedes pedir algunas semillas en línea y comenzar a cultivarlas. Si sientes que es seguro interactuar en el vecindario, puedes ver; hay un montón de vecindarios que tienen Listservs, donde mucha gente se inscribe en un correo electrónico y reciben una notificación o un correo electrónico cada vez que alguien quiere hablar sobre algo relacionado con el vecindario.

 

En mi vecindario, por ejemplo, hay algunos grupos que se formaron y algunos se reúnen en línea, la gente a la que le gusta tejer se reúne en línea y comparte lo que está tejiendo, o antes de la pandemia había grupos de gente que salía a caminar o que hacían jardinería. Es cuestión de pensar en tus intereses, también. Esas son las dos cosas principales con las que empezaría: ¿quiénes son las personas con las que quiero interactuar? Y, en segundo lugar, ¿tengo algunos intereses particulares, ya sea la jardinería o algo parecido, que me pueda ayudar a pasar un poco más de tiempo afuera?

 

Jason Young: Bueno, gracias por eso. Tengo que decir rápidamente que a veces puedes sentir que tu red de amigos se va reduciendo, particularmente si has perdido a algunas personas. Hablaremos sobre esto en un ratito, pero AARP tiene algunos voluntarios a quienes les gustaría conectarse contigo. Te contaremos sobre el programa "La Voz Amigable" que tenemos. Jean, volvamos a la línea, ¿a quién tenemos?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra siguiente llamada es de Eleanor de Illinois.

 

Jason Young: Adelante, Eleanor.

 

Eleanor: Mi pregunta, como hablaron sobre usar las cosas que ustedes tienen, ¿qué se necesita para que yo pueda usar u obtener copias de lo que sea que tienen? ¿Todos deben tener una computadora o todos deben tener…? ¿Qué? Ustedes dicen: "Hagan estas cosas", pero, llega un momento en el que digo: ¿Cómo hago para obtener eso? Además, muchos de nosotros no usamos computadoras.

 

Jason Young: Esa es una muy buena pregunta. Pidámosle a Jo Ann que se una a la conversación porque creo que los pódcast están disponibles en teléfonos y en computadoras, pero también está la radio tradicional. Jo Ann, ¿qué opinas?

 

Jo Ann Allen: Sí, obviamente está la radio tradicional, pero puedes descargar los pódcast en tu teléfono celular. Y la manera de hacerlo… Es un poco difícil explicarlo ahora, pero, si tienes un familiar más joven, Eleanor, que pueda ayudarte a aprender un poco sobre la tecnología que deberías aprender. Es muy poco. No tengas miedo, porque es muy poco lo que debes aprender.

 

Mucha gente puede hacerlo como para que te digas a ti misma: "No puedo hacerlo". Solo necesitas que alguien te demuestre cómo hacerlo. Porque ten en cuenta que los jóvenes que hoy usan la tecnología y la conocen como si fuera la palma de sus manos, en algún momento tuvieron que aprender a hacerlo. No es algo que ellos pueden aprender, sino que es algo que todos podemos aprender. Y puede tomarte un poco más de tiempo comprenderlo, pero te garantizo que puedes entender la tecnología con la ayuda de alguien para descargarlo en tu computadora o para descargarlo en tu teléfono. Y te garantizo que una vez que tengas esa posibilidad adicional de poder escuchar los pódcast, porque hay millones de pódcast no hay solo algunos, sino que hay todo tipo de pódcast.

 

Y estoy segura de que encontrarás algo que te interese. Entonces, ¿qué tienes que hacer? En primer lugar, piensa en las cosas que te gusta escuchar o en las cosas que quieres aprender, sobre cocina, deportes, lo que sea, y luego pídele a alguien que sepa sobre tecnología que te enseñe cómo hacerlo. Mi mamá siempre decía: "Puedes hacerlo, porque muchas otras personas también pueden hacerlo". No es una cirugía de cerebro, no hace falta ser Einstein. Es realmente fácil una vez que lo comprendes. Ese sería mi consejo: que alguien te muestre cómo hacerlo.

 

Jason Young: Creo que es un muy buen consejo. Y yo… Tutorial. Y creo que WNYC, que es uno de los gigantes de pódcast en el país, es realmente genial, hace muchos programas fantásticos. Ellos también te mostrarán cómo hacerlo. Vamos a tomar una llamada más ahora. Volvamos a la línea, Jean. ¿A quién tenemos?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra siguiente llamada es de James de Georgia.

 

Jason Young: Adelante, James.

 

James: Hola, buenas tardes o buenas noches. Gracias por darme la oportunidad para hablar. Me llamo James y estoy a finales de mis 70 años, así que estoy en ese grupo. Pero quiero hablar sobre lo que la doctora habló antes, cuando escuchas diferentes pensamientos en tu mente, si es que comprendí bien. Eso me ha pasado. Escucho… En mi mente, a veces escucho dos voces. Una es el lado positivo y la otra es el lado negativo. Y es como que las dos se enfrentan intentando ganar el espacio principal… Ser el sentimiento principal.

 

Pero lo que hago ahora es intentar hablar con el lado positivo porque no estoy mirando el lado negativo porque no me da información que me va a resultar útil. Pero el lado positivo me dirige a cosas buenas, pensamientos buenos, y me permite hacer cosas bastante buenas. Por ejemplo, debido a que no nos permiten estar cerca de mucha gente y a mi esposa no le gusta salir mucho, cuando me levanto a la mañana, lo primero que hago después de asearme y vestirme es ir a mi vestidor y me arrodillo y rezo allí. Eso hago yo, no puedo hablar por los demás. Y es allí donde le rezo a Dios.

 

Luego, cuando me voy de allí, voy al comedor y leo el Evangelio. Una vez que leo el Evangelio y hablo con mi esposa, conduzco hasta un bar cerca de donde vivo, y allí hay un lago hermoso y mesas y varias cosas. En los días preciosos bastante gente va allí. Y simplemente me siento en mi auto con las ventanillas cerradas, a veces, y observo a las personas mientas se alejan caminando y qué han pensado, cómo se han comunicado los unos con los otros. Yo no escucho lo que dicen, pero puedo verlo. Cuando hago eso, me siento mejor conmigo mismo cuando me voy de allí. Y ese es mi día. Esa es una parte de mi día. Ahora, debido a mi edad, había otras cosas que quería decir, pero no puedo pensar qué era. Ese fue mi pensamiento del día.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, gracias por compartirlo. Dra. Bonior, ¿qué opinas?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Me encanta. Me encanta ese ritual que has incorporado. Cuando nos sentamos y miramos el lago y vemos a otras personas, eso es algo realmente bueno para nuestra mente y nuestro cuerpo. Y lo que me sorprendió es que encontraste una manera de hacer una pausa. Sé que se habla mucho sobre la atención plena hoy en día, y que todos saben que se supone que es algo bueno, pero nadie sabe exactamente qué es.

 

Pero esa es la esencia de la atención plena, es estar dispuesto a hacer una pausa, sentarse y observar, y ser amable con uno mismo. Mirar el lago, y ver a la gente pasar y ver cuán poderoso es eso para ti. Eso ayuda a conectarte a la Tierra, y ayuda a sentir como que hay algo en el mundo que es especial y bello, aunque es un momento de todos los días. Me encanta lo que dijiste sobre la manera en la que observas tus pensamientos, eso también es parte de la atención plena.

 

Es poder observar nuestros pensamientos y ver cómo la parte positiva y la negativa quieren comenzar a combatir. Y mencionaste cómo realmente pueden luchar una contra la otra. Creo que muchos de nosotros hacen eso y luego nos sentimos cansados por la lucha, ¿verdad? Por eso creo que es importante hacer exactamente lo que haces, que es decir simplemente: "¿Es negativo este pensamiento?" "¿Es certero?", "¿Me está ayudando?", "¿Me está enseñando algo o es como el chico ebrio y ruidoso en la audiencia que debe ser ignorado?".

 

Y, honestamente, así es como son muchos de nuestros pensamientos. Son como el espectador molesto en el club de la comedia. No podemos hacer que desaparezca por completo, pero si lo alimentamos, si interactuamos con él, si le damos poder, luego empieza a tomar el poder, mientras lo que has hecho es todo lo contrario. Has dicho: "No tienes nada que enseñarme, pensamiento negativo; estos pensamientos positivos son lo que debo alimentar, en los que debo gastar tiempo y energía". Me siento inspirada al escuchar la manera en la que lo has puesto en práctica porque ambos aspectos, la observación de los pensamientos y la creación de ese ritual, donde sientes que estás afuera y estás observando el mundo natural, ambas son partes importantes de la atención plena. Por eso, agradezco que lo hayas compartido.

 

Jason Young: Sí, gracias a todos por estas preguntas geniales. Es grandioso escucharlos. Realmente tenemos los mejores oyentes y lo agradecemos. Maya Angelou una vez dijo: "No hay agonía más grande que quedarte con una historia sin contar guardada". Jo Ann, ¿qué hacemos si tenemos una historia que necesitamos compartir?

 

Jo Ann Allen: Bueno, lo primero que haces es darte permiso para compartir esa historia. Te liberas al escribir tus pensamientos o si tienes una grabadora, hablar al micrófono, en la grabadora, puedes divagar, puedes cometer errores gramaticales. Es tu primer desvío, por decirlo de alguna manera. No es el producto final, pero lo que buscas hacer es soltar lo que estás guardando adentro. Y no tiene que hacerse de una manera perfecta.

 

Siempre editamos nuestros pensamientos antes de guardarlos. Siempre editamos nuestros movimientos cuando estamos en público. No lo hagas más. Déjate llevar, permítete ser libre. Escríbelo, dilo en la grabadora, dilo frente a la videocámara. Simplemente saca lo que estás sintiendo, pensando, queriendo, necesitando, esperando, todo eso, suéltalo, porque te sentirás más liviano. Y podrías tener una idea para un pódcast.

 

Jason Young: Ah, me encanta esa idea. Jo Ann, estaba pensando en ti debido al episodio especial que hiciste con "Death, Sex & Money". Este es el pódcast que produce WNYC, como dije, es fantástico, y este episodio tiene una muy buena narrativa porque estás hablando con adultos mayores sobre superar la pandemia. Hablaste con una mujer llamada Susan que tiene 70 años, es de Virginia y tiene una hija que vive en el extranjero y a quien ella no puede ver. Tal vez podemos reproducir una parte de esta charla rápidamente.

 

Susan: Mi hija vive en Nueva Zelanda. Y ahora, con esta pandemia, hablamos por lo menos una vez por semana, pero no sabemos cuándo vamos a volver a vernos. Incluso antes de la pandemia, ella me dijo en un momento: "Empecé a pensar en cuántas veces podremos estar juntas nuevamente". Y creo que ese tipo de cosas que comienzas a pensar cuando tienes 70 años, ¿cuánto tiempo te queda? ¿Cuántas veces podré hacer esto? Si voy a hacer algo, mejor lo hago ahora. Eso está mucho en mi mente.

 

Jo Ann Allen: Es difícil pensar en fallecer antes de poder ver a las personas importantes de tu vida, en especial durante la pandemia.

 

Susan: Sí, lo es. Realmente lo es. Es decir, ella incluso me dijo: "No estoy segura de que hubiera tomado la decisión de quedarme aquí para siempre, si lo hubiera sabido". Así que tuve que decirme a mí misma que mi amor por ella, mi relación con ella, no significa necesariamente que tengo que estar físicamente al lado de ella, que hay mucho más entre nosotras que podemos disfrutar y que nos benefician sin estar físicamente en el mismo lugar, pero aun así es triste y difícil, porque hay un montón de cosas que quiero hacer.

 

Jason Young: Cielos. Jo Ann, Susan me impresionó con esa reflexión. Quiero repetir lo que dijo: "Hay mucho más entre nosotras que podemos disfrutar y que nos beneficia sin estar físicamente en el mismo espacio". Creo que es fascinante cómo Susan tuvo que hablarse a sí misma sobre el amor por su hija y cómo pueden disfrutar de su relación, pero de nuevas maneras, y luego tú lo enfatizaste. Después de todas estas conversaciones que tuviste que hacer para armar ese episodio especial, Jo Ann, ¿qué aprendiste?

 

Jo Ann Allen: Bueno, definitivamente había confirmado para mis adentros que la gente mayor tiene mucho para decir. Tenemos muchas historias. Tenemos una vida de historias. Sé que sigo hablando sobre las historias, pero es que las historias son mi vida. Todos somos diferentes pero iguales. Y cuando alguien habla sobre dónde está, qué quiere, te haces una idea de que la gente puede, de hecho, sanarse a sí misma al dejar salir lo que está sintiendo.

 

Eso no significa que las cosas pueden dar un nuevo giro, pero si te contactas con tus sentimientos, esto es lo que encontré cuando hice el episodio "Death, Sex and Money" es que cuando la gente se conecta con sus sentimientos realmente puede hacerse una idea de quiénes son y qué quieren, y cómo pueden seguir adelante, porque hubo horas de charlas con la gente y mucho de lo que grabamos obviamente no lo pude usar.

 

Pero esas personas, al final de todas esas conversaciones que tuvimos he aprendido cosas que no tenía idea que existían o que la gente vivía de esa manera, pero ellos también se vieron a sí mismos por quiénes son o descubrieron quiénes son. Y estaban felices por eso. No creo haber hablado con alguien que se sintió como: "Cielos, me gustaría no haberlo dicho", o: "Vaya, pienso eso" o: "No quiero pensar eso".

 

No, era una cuestión de conocerse mejor a sí mismos, y para mí eso es un regalo, porque me encanta escuchar lo que la gente tiene para decir, pero en particular me encanta escuchar lo que la gente mayor tiene para decir. Porque cuando miras hacia atrás es cuando puedes darles sentido a las cosas y luego llegar a la conclusión sobre lo que quieres que sea tu vida. Simplemente digo: saca esas historias de tu cuerpo. Es decir, esta noche la gente que nos está escuchando ahora, cuando termine el programa, siéntense y escriban algunos pensamientos, siéntense y piensen en lo que están sintiendo.

 

Es muy fácil hacer eso ahora, porque estamos en medio de la pandemia, pero puedes tomar este tiempo durante la pandemia para conocerte más a ti mismo, para conocer más a tu cónyuge, para conocer más a tus nietos. Digo, conoce sobre todo a tus nietos, para que eso te ayude a comprender el valor que ellos ven en ti. Y nuevamente, podría haber un pódcast disponible si realmente comienzas a pensar en las cosas que te interesan, porque eso es lo más importante en cuanto a comenzar un pódcast: debe ser algo que realmente quieres hacer. No lo empieces simplemente porque: "Ya sabes, juego al golf, entonces quizás debo empezar un pódcast sobre golf". No. Piensa en lo que te gusta y lo que disfrutas y avanza desde allí. Investiga qué se necesita para hacer un pódcast o investiga cómo puedes conseguir pódcast que sean útiles para ti.

 

Jason Young: Creo que un punto de partida es esta necesidad de reconectarse, de reconectarnos con nosotros mismos, los unos con los otros. Me encanta esta idea de reconectarnos a través de las generaciones y algunas de las historias podrían conducir a una conversación por teléfono o correo electrónico. Pero, Dra. Bonior, recientemente escribiste un artículo sobre siete maneras para crear interacciones gratificantes en línea y algunos consejos muy buenos. ¿Puedes compartirlos?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Claro. Creo que lo principal es tener en cuenta que las interacciones en línea tienen limitaciones, ya sabes, hay maneras en las que nunca serán tan buenas. No puedes dar una palmadita en el hombro a alguien, o quizás hay problemas técnicos, y eso significa que la voz de alguien no suena exactamente igual. Pero, en general, mientras más piensas en recrear lo que pasaría en persona, mucho mejor. Entonces, eso incluye la espontaneidad, ¿cierto?

 

Una de las cosas preciosas de encontrarse en persona es que hay un intercambio en tiempo real que se siente espontáneo. Y en línea, a veces, si estamos enviando un correo electrónico o un mensaje de texto, o intentando hacer una reunión por Zoom con un grupo grande de personas, no se siente espontáneo, es como que ensayamos. Si estás en las redes sociales como Facebook o alguna otra, ese es un gran problema: ensayamos lo que queremos decir y no nos permitimos ser vulnerables. Por eso, creo que esto es clave: cuando estás en línea, piensa en hacer más preguntas, piensa en tener más interacción.

 

Muchos de nosotros en línea solo hacemos declaraciones, ¿verdad? Estamos en Facebook y publicamos algo importante y en verdad no interactuamos. Por eso, piensa en cómo permitirte ser vulnerable, cómo mostrar las partes que de hecho te ayudarán a conectarte con más profundidad emocional y, de igual forma, piensa en la comunidad. Mucha gente se une a las redes sociales, o comienzan enviando un correo electrónico a sus nietos, y eso es genial, pero también piensa en las maneras en las que puedes usar internet para sentir realmente que eres parte de algo más grande, de cosas como grupos de personas que comparten los mismos intereses que tú, o hacer búsquedas en Google para foros de discusión sobre los tipos de manualidades, fotografía, cocina o programas que te gustan, y tener como objetivo la comunidad es una manera de sentirse más conectado en vez de tener algunas personas con quienes interactúas en línea.

 

Sabemos que es muy poderoso sentir que somos parte de algo, incluso más que las relaciones en sí mismas. Además, piensa en cómo usar internet para ayudar a otras personas. Hay una gran mejora de ánimo cuando sientes que hubieras ayudado a otras personas. Y, aunque no lo creas, hay muchas oportunidades virtuales para voluntarios que están disponibles, ya sea para conectarse con alguien que está solo o hacer algún trabajo básico de recaudación de fondos por una causa en la que crees. Además, ya que estamos hablando de internet, creo que una manera de asegurarte de que te mantienes emocionalmente satisfecho es saber que aún hay opciones con tecnología simple.

 

En medio de la pandemia, un grupo de amigos y yo que siempre estamos haciendo reuniones en Zoom, ya sabes, como "¿Saben qué? Podemos llamarnos por teléfono, no tenemos que reunirnos en Zoom hoy". No olvides que aún existen las opciones con tecnología simple. No queremos meternos en un aprieto porque estamos decididos a usar internet. Por último, comprende tus límites. A veces, estás cansado de la computadora y eso está bien, tómate el tiempo de hacer que las cosas funcionen para ti.

 

Si estás usando Zoom por primera vez, o cualquiera de esos programas de videoconferencias, o si estás usando FaceTime con tu nieto, hay distintas configuraciones que puedes probar para que te sientas más cómodo. Como algunas personas en Zoom, no quieren ver sus rostros allí y se ponen nerviosos por tener que mirarse cuando están hablando con un grupo de amigos o familia. Hay una manera de hacer que no veas tu rostro allí, aunque tus amigos y tu familia pueden verte, no tienes que mirarte a ti mismo todo el tiempo. Entonces, prueba las configuraciones para hacer que funcionen para ti y haz que sea una experiencia personalizada. Es mucho más probable que te sientas cómodo de esa manera, y es más probable que sea más satisfactorio emocionalmente.

 

Jason Young: Sí, hay días en los que uso tecnología simple, así que es un buen consejo. Vamos a compartir algunos recursos e información con nuestros oyentes. Espero que tengas a mano lápiz y papel, hablando de tecnología simple, porque podrías querer anotar algunas cosas. Y, por supuesto, también puedes escuchar este episodio nuevamente, este programa nuevamente, si quieres. Pero quiero presentar a Heather Nawrocki, que es vicepresidenta de Diversión y Satisfacción de AARP. Bienvenida, Heather. Como estamos hablando de la importancia de mantenernos conectados… Hola, Heather. Estás allí, qué bueno.

 

Heather Nawrocki: Hola, aquí estoy.

 

Jason Young: Bueno. Hemos estado hablando esta noche sobre el aislamiento social que nos está afectando negativamente a todos, y tienes una noción de eso. Es decir, ¿qué crees que está pasando con la gente de 50 años o más en estos días?

 

Heather Nawrocki: Bueno, mirando la investigación actual, descubrí que dos tercios de los adultos informan que sufren algún tipo de aislamiento social y altos niveles de ansiedad desde el comienzo de la pandemia. Y eso incluye a todos, todos los adultos, pero cuando miramos a las personas de 50 años o más que han sufrido aislamiento social durante la pandemia, la mitad informó que siente menos motivación, cuatro de cada diez personas informaron que sienten más ansiedad de lo habitual, y más de un tercio de esas personas han estado deprimidas. La cuestión es que el aislamiento social y la soledad crónica son asuntos graves que realmente pueden afectar la salud de una persona. Esto es algo de lo que todos debemos ser conscientes y tomar medidas para sentirnos más conectados.

 

Jason Young: Seguro. ¿Qué está haciendo AARP para ayudar a la gente? Estamos viviendo esto todos juntos, todos en esta llamada hoy sienten este aislamiento. ¿Qué podemos hacer para conectarnos, aprender y divertirnos un poco?

 

Heather Nawrocki: Claro que sí. Bueno, AARP ha trabajado muy duro para ofrecer ayuda a la gente durante este tiempo realmente difícil. Por ejemplo, AARP ha lanzado el programa "La Voz Amiga" en el que cualquier persona mayor de 18 años puede recibir una llamada y tener un oído amable que escuche y con quien poder hablar, así que las personas solo deben pedir una llamada y un voluntario de AARP los llamará. Quien esté interesado en recibir una llamada, debe visitar el sitio web aarp.org/friendlyvoice.

 

También estoy emocionada esta noche de anunciar un nuevo destino en línea llamado AARP Virtual Community Center. Es como las instalaciones de un centro comunitario en persona, donde puedes encontrar todo tipo de clases y actividades y experiencias, y gente que comparte los mismos intereses que tú, pero todo lo de Virtual Community Center de AARP es en línea. Tienen muchas experiencias diferentes. Continúa.

 

Jason Young: Iba a… Eso es increíble porque tengo muchos amigos en mi vida que fueron a lugares formales o informales y no sienten que pueden ir allí. Por eso ahora tenemos esta alternativa. ¿Qué puede esperar la gente? ¿Qué tipo de clases o actividades, qué se lleva a cabo allí?

 

Heather Nawrocki: De hecho, tenemos nueve categorías de diversión y experiencias informativas, categorías tales como asistencia, vida saludable, entretenimiento, y entretenimiento puede ser música o películas, vida saludable, cocina, ayuda tecnológica, conducción segura, prevención contra fraudes. Y el que realmente… Mi categoría favorita es: aprendizaje permanente.

 

Allí es donde vas a encontrar todo tipo de distintas clases, ya sea una clase sobre historia culinaria o una charla con un experto en investigación criminal sobre los delitos cibernéticos, hay mucho en el aprendizaje permanente, así que animo a la gente que lo explore. Cuando miro el calendario para las próximas dos semanas, hay más de 30 actividades programadas.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, eso es genial. Voy a echarle un vistazo. Quiero mencionar algunas cosas, pero, Heather, gracias por acompañarnos. Aquellos que todavía tienen a mano lápiz y papel, estas son algunas ideas adicionales. AARP tiene un pódcast llamado "Take on Today". Nuevamente, puedes ir a aarp.org/pódcasts, con "S" al final, y, de hecho, tenemos una invitada especial en el episodio de esta semana. Es una coanfitriona de Jo Ann que ha trabajado en este episodio especial sobre "Getting Real About Getting Older". Su nombre es Anna Sale.

 

Si no la has escuchado antes, ella tiene mucha pasión y va a compartirnos sus mejores consejos sobre los pódcast, así que deberías escucharla. Ella trabaja en WNYC, y, de hecho, creó el programa "Death, Sex & Money" y te va a encantar escucharla. También nos acompañó recientemente en "Take on Today" el Dr. Sanjay Gupta de CNN y puedes escuchar este episodio en tu computadora o en tu teléfono sobre la salud cerebral. Él da algunos consejos sobre cómo mantener la salud cerebral y disipó algunos mitos.

 

Otra persona divertida que nos acompañó es Scott Kelly, el astronauta que vivió en el espacio durante un año. Él habla sobre cómo ese año que vivió en el espacio le dio una verdadera perspectiva y cómo afrontar los sentimientos de aislamiento social que está teniendo ahora. También nos acompañó Suze Orman, la experta financiera que nos dio consejos sobre asesoría financiera para cualquiera que esté pensando en jubilarse, en los problemas económicos y en todo ese tipo de cosas de las que te preocupas en este momento. Tenemos tres invitados geniales que hacen el programa y te encantará conocerlos. Y todo es gratuito. Así que asegúrate de echarle un vistazo a "Take on Today" y a "Death, Sex & Money".

 

También quiero contarte sobre algunos boletines informativos del equipo especial que existen. Todos conocen los diarios tradicionales y los sitios web, entre otros, pero hay algunos boletines informativos semanales realmente divertidos y gratuitos. Tenemos uno llamado "The Girlfriend", que es específicamente sobre belleza, salud, sexo, consejos para la vida, y se envía directamente a tu bandeja de entrada. Se envía por correo electrónico y puedes suscribirte en thegirlfriend.com, thegirlfriend.com.

 

O tenemos este, que es uno de mis favoritos y se llama "The Ethel". Es un boletín informativo sobre estilo de vida. De hecho, es… Es un boletín informativo sobre estilo de vida. Está inspirado en nuestra fundadora, la maravillosa fundadora de AARP, la Dra. Ethel Percy Andrus, y ya sea que tengas 50, 60, 70 años o más, hay muchos artículos geniales e historias relacionadas con la salud, con la belleza, con la intimidad, con las relaciones y todo eso, y está escrito por mujeres como tú. Lo puedes encontrar en aarpethel.com.

 

Volvamos a algunas preguntas de nuestros oyentes. Antes de hacer eso, quiero decirte dónde encontrar el Virtual Community Center que Heather mencionó. Para eso, debes ir a aarp.org/virtual-community-center, aarp.org/virtual-community-center, o simplemente ve a la página de inicio de AARP y verás una promoción que te llevará directamente allí, pero te van a encantar todas las nuevas cosas que estarán disponibles en línea. Tomemos rápidamente un par de preguntas y llamados. Jean, ¿quién está en la línea?

 

Jean Setzfand: La gente que pregunta a través de YouTube ha sido muy paciente, por eso quiero ir a la pregunta de la Sra. Adele, que pregunta: "¿Qué ocurre cuando tus pensamientos y la ansiedad te quitan el apetito?".

 

Jason Young: Excelente pregunta. Dra. Bonior, ¿qué opinas sobre la pregunta de Adele?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Sí, es algo muy común, lamentablemente. Por eso, se debe empezar de a poco. Primero, recomiendo ejercicios de respiración para este tipo de ansiedad. Porque, cuando pierdes el apetito, eso significa que básicamente tu sistema nervioso periférico está saturado. Está diciendo: "Hay una amenaza, debemos estar de guardia por la amenaza, estamos en peligro, no tenemos tiempo para comer", y, básicamente, la digestión se detiene. Por eso, comienza con algunos ejercicios de respiración.

 

Es muy importante inhalar lentamente por la nariz y puedes contar hasta cinco o diez mientras haces esto. Entonces, inhala lentamente y debes esforzarte en expandir la panza. Es así como sabes que estás llevando el oxígeno profundamente a través del abdomen, en vez de respirar superficialmente a través del pecho, algo que en realidad no reabastece nuestros niveles de oxígeno.

 

Comienza con esos ejercicios lentos de respiración y exhala lentamente por la boca y presta atención a las maneras en las que la ansiedad también está alcanzando a otros lugares de tu cuerpo. Tal vez tienes mucha tensión profunda. Tal vez puedes hacer algunos ejercicios en los que giras la cabeza de un lado a otro, o hay algo llamado relajación muscular progresiva donde puedes apretar los puños y los pies y los grupos musculares y luego permites que se relajen. Cuando estás perdiendo el apetito, es muy importante intentar comenzar de a poco para ayudar a tu cuerpo a que se relaje. Lo bueno es que es una especie de círculo, mientras ayudas a tu cuerpo para que se relaje, tus pensamientos también se relajan, lo que a la vez ayuda a tu cuerpo a tener un poco menos de ansiedad, entonces tienes un impulso para ir en la dirección correcta.

 

Pero yo comenzaría de a poco en lo que se refiere a la comida. Tal vez una comida abundante sea algo excesivo. Tal vez hay algo que resulta bueno en una cantidad menor. Si solo vas a comer algo ligero durante el día, eso está bien. El punto es intentar obtener algo de alimentación cuando puedas e intentar comenzar de a poco. Cualquier persona que esté sufriendo de náuseas o pérdida de apetito, sin importar la razón, puede beneficiarse al no exigirse demasiado a sí misma. Intentar comer… Sin importar lo que sea, si parece bueno, intentar comer de a poco, pequeñas cucharadas cada vez y simplemente ser amables con uno mismo para que estar obligándose a comer algo que va a resultar contraproducente y hacerte sentir peor. Es momento de concentrarse en la respiración y de intentar comprender la ansiedad desde una perspectiva física. Esa es una de las cosas más importantes para hacer cuando sabes que está afectándote físicamente con la pérdida del apetito, que es un síntoma común.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, gracias por esa pregunta, Adele. Y gracias por esos buenos consejos, Dra. Bonior. Vayamos con otra pregunta. Jean, ¿a quién tenemos?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestro siguiente llamado… Claro. El siguiente llamado es de Carrie, de Carolina del Norte.

 

Jason Young: Adelante.

 

Carrie: Hola. Mi esposo tiene 80 y yo tengo 76, y nunca le he agradecido en público por ser tan persistente e insistente de que nos vacunemos contra la COVID-19. Recibimos la primera vacuna el jueves pasado y la segunda vacuna fue programada para el 9 de febrero. Estoy agradecida por su dedicación conmigo. Yo tengo una enfermedad, la enfermedad de Parkinson, así que él ha sido mi cuidador desde el 2018. Y luego apareció la COVID-19 y él tuvo que ser… Es decir, él ha sido maravilloso conmigo y quiero agradecérselo públicamente. En segundo lugar, quiero preguntar, cuando empecé a escuchar el evento, la doctora estaba explicando sobre los pódcast de noticias, pero no pude escuchar toda la información al respecto. Si pudiera hacer una breve explicación sobre el mecanismo del pódcast y en qué se diferencia de lo que estamos haciendo ahora.

 

Jason Young: Claro. Bueno, en primer lugar, Carrie, si me permites decirlo, fue hermoso agradecerle a tu esposo de esa manera. Algunas personas dicen que te vacunes para protegerte a ti mismo, pero me has inspirado en que la verdadera razón es hacerlo por todos. Es conmovedor y realmente maravilloso que ambos lo hayan hecho y les deseo mucha salud. Jo Ann, ¿puedes responder su pregunta sobre cómo comenzar a escuchar pódcast si no estás segura dónde comenzar?

 

Jo Ann Allen: Sí. Quiero repetir lo que dijiste, Jason. Carrie, fue hermoso lo que dijiste sobre tu esposo. Es decir, es muy emotivo. La manera de aprender sobre pódcast, yo empezaría por, si usas una computadora, o si no usas una computadora, consigue a alguien que sepa cómo usar una computadora y busca "podcasting" en Google. Eso te llevará a una explicación sobre qué es un pódcast, que es audio a pedido. Tienes la posibilidad de escuchar un pódcast cuando quieras hacerlo.

 

No es algo que debes sintonizar en cierto momento para poder escucharlo. Son portátiles porque puedes ponerlos en tu computadora o puedes ponerlos en tu teléfono. Y tienes la posibilidad de llevar un pódcast contigo a cualquier sitio. Si vas a caminar o si estás sentado en la mesa del comedor y quieres escuchar un pódcast, está disponible en ese momento. Mi consejo principalmente es, debido a que poder explicar exactamente cómo puedes escuchar un pódcast llevaría un poco más de tiempo del que tengo aquí para explicarlo.

 

Por eso, diría: busca "podcasting" en Google y el mundo se abrirá para ti. No tienes que aprender cómo hacer esto a toda prisa, es decir, hazlo a tu ritmo. Esto es algo que, mientras tenemos que quedarnos en casa debido a la pandemia, es algo que puedes investigar de a poco cada día. Y si haces eso, con el tiempo comprenderás dónde puedes encontrar los pódcast, qué tipo de pódcast podrían interesarte, porque hay pódcast de comedia, hay pódcast de cuestiones políticas, hay pódcast de noticias, hay pódcast con personas que se sientan a hablar unos con otros. Pero es otro medio que puedes usar que podría ayudarte a salir adelante en esta pandemia.

 

Y, como dije, pídele a alguien que te ayude. Por lo general, la gente joven está muy emocionada con los pódcast. Si tienes hijos, nietos, bisnietos, pídeles que te ayuden a descubrir cómo obtener un pódcast o cómo escuchar pódcast. Y te aseguro que te encantarán porque es otra manera de escuchar historias, es otra manera de aprender sobre el mundo que te rodea, es otra manera de estar en el mundo, de ser parte del mundo. Pero, nuevamente, Carrie, lo que dijiste sobre tu esposo fue hermoso. Gracias por eso.

 

Jason Young: Y hay un mundo completamente virtual allí afuera, y espero que por lo menos algunos salgan a explorarlo. Estoy emocionado; me aceleraste, Jo Ann. Bueno, no puedo terminar sin palabras de optimismo. Así que, Jo Ann, voy a comenzar contigo. Despídenos con algo que realmente necesitamos saber.

 

Jo Ann Allen: Bueno, Jason, esto es solo una conversación de la que he disfrutado participar, pero también animo a nuestros oyentes para que nos acompañen en el especial de llamadas de "Getting Real About Getting Older" que se llevará a cabo el próximo miércoles 3 de febrero desde las 8 hasta las 10 p.m., hora del este. Seré la coanfitriona del programa de dos horas con mi amiga Anna Sale, que es la anfitriona de "Death, Sex & Money".

 

Nuestro programa será un diálogo intergeneracional sobre las historias y las cuestiones que surgieron en los pódcast que ella y yo hicimos. Y puedes compartir tus pensamientos sobre el envejecimiento al escuchar el programa, y puedes llamar. El programa se transmitirá en vivo en wnyc.org, cpr.org y en WNYC, en la página de Facebook de "Death, Sex & Money". Podemos conversar incluso más el próximo miércoles sobre pódcast, sobre las cuestiones intergeneracionales y sobre las cuestiones que nos enfrentan a nosotros, como gente mayor, porque yo tengo 67 años y estoy muy feliz de tener 67 años. Pero quiero escuchar a la mayor cantidad posible de gente mayor mientras continuamos con nuestro diálogo. También quiero decir que creo que es maravilloso que AARP tenga una vicepresidenta de diversión y entretenimiento, ¡qué título alegre! Eso es genial.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, creo que ya ocuparon ese cargo, pero si alguna vez queda vacante, Jo Ann, te llamaré a ti. Dra. Bonior, ¿cuáles son tus palabras de optimismo antes de terminar?

 

Dra. Andrea Bonior: Sí, creo que este año que pasó ha sido muy oscuro. Tenemos muchas razones para tener esperanza, las noticias de la vacuna es una de ellas. Y es un homenaje hermoso lo que escuchamos, que la gente está pendiente de los demás, la gente se preocupa por los demás o ayuda a que los demás se vacunen y se mantengan a salvo. Quiero decir que, cuando las cosas parecen ser oscuras, desde un punto de vista de salud mental, me gusta ayudar a la gente a concentrarse en las cosas grandes y pequeñas, porque, por lo general, nos quedamos atrapados en el medio. Entonces, retrocede cuando sientes ansiedad, intenta pensar en el concepto general: ¿Cuál es el significado aquí? ¿Qué ganaré de esta experiencia? ¿Cómo se relaciona esto con mis valores? ¿Qué es importante para mí?

 

Luego, a veces también debemos concentrarnos en los momentos más pequeños. A veces parece que es demasiado, y puede ser una cuestión de mirar el vapor que sale de tu taza de té, o sentarte y escuchar música que te gusta, y si ha sido un mal día, pero durante esos tres o cinco minutos, esos pequeños momentos a veces pueden ayudar a seguir adelante. Por eso no me gustaría que esta conversación terminara aquí. Estoy en línea, mi sitio web es: drandreabonior.com o detoxyourthoughts.com. Escribo mucho, escribo para "Psychology Today", realmente me apasiona dar consejos sobre salud mental allí.

 

También estoy en las redes sociales, si alguno usa Facebook o alguna otra red social, me puede encontrar allí. Por último, si estás en apuros, si estás interesado en escuchar más sobre los verdaderos consejos prácticos, las mismas cosas que uso con mis clientes en terapia sobre cómo manejar la ansiedad, el libro "Detox Your Thoughts" está disponible donde sea que venden libros. Si vives en un lugar como yo, donde las bibliotecas todavía están cerradas y las librerías tienen restricciones hasta cierto punto, puedes pedirlo en línea, pero me gustaría continuar esta conversación con todos ustedes. Y quiero agradecerles por acompañarnos esta noche, porque al hacer que sea una prioridad el cuidado de ustedes mismos, también pueden ayudar a cuidar a otras personas de la comunidad. Y creo que es importante que reconozcamos que estamos todos conectados y que necesitamos cuidarnos no solo mutuamente sino también a nosotros mismos. Así que gracias por invitarme.

 

Jason Young: Bueno, gracias a ambas. Todos los recursos que mencionamos hoy, incluida una grabación de la actividad de preguntas y respuestas de hoy, se pueden encontrar en aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Si eres un cuidador de familia y necesitas ayuda, visita aarp.org/caregiving o llama a la línea de ayuda a la familia al 877-333-5885. Repito: el número es 877-333-5885.

 

Gracias a los socios de AARP, a los voluntarios y a los oyentes por participar de esta exposición. Quiero agradecer especialmente a nuestras invitadas especiales, la Dra. Andrea Bonior, Jo Ann Allen y Heather Nawrocki por acompañarnos esta noche. Tenemos una larga lista de cosas para hacer ahora, desde inscribirnos en Virtual Community Center a ser parte del programa de llamadas el próximo 3 de febrero, la próxima semana, para "Getting Real About Getting Older" y WYNC, hasta echarle un vistazo al nuevo libro de la Dra. Bonior, "Detox Your Thoughts", e incluso explorar la posibilidad de escuchar tu primer pódcast.

 

Asegúrate de sintonizarnos el jueves 11 de febrero a la 1 p.m., hora del este, para otra actividad de AARP en vivo donde tendremos más expertos para responder preguntas relacionadas con las vacunas, mantenerse a salvo, cuidar a los seres queridos y mutuamente. Puedes mirar este video en aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Soy Jason Young, en nombre de AARP te agradezco por acompañarnos en esta actividad especial. Buenas noches, y esto finaliza nuestra actividad en vivo. Buenas noches.

 

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, soy Bill Walsh, vicepresidente de AARP, y quiero darles la bienvenida a esta importante discusión sobre el coronavirus. Antes de comenzar, si deseas escuchar esta teleasamblea en español, presiona *0 en el teclado de tu teléfono ahora. AARP, una organización de membresía, sin fines de lucro y no partidista, ha estado trabajando para promover la salud y el bienestar de los adultos mayores en EE.UU. durante más de 60 años.

 

Frente a la pandemia mundial de coronavirus, AARP brinda información y recursos para ayudar a los adultos mayores y a quienes los cuidan. Como muchos de ustedes han visto, al cerrar el primer mes del año nuevo, la pandemia continúa mostrando signos de empeoramiento. Sin embargo, seguimos viendo grandes desafíos en la distribución de la vacuna.

 

Los consumidores se sienten frustrados por los sistemas confusos para registrarse para recibir la inyección. Y a los Gobiernos locales les está costando mantenerse al día con la demanda. Y, desafortunadamente, donde la necesidad es mayor, en hogares de ancianos y centros de cuidados a largo plazo, millones todavía no están vacunados. Abordaremos estos problemas y más con nuestro panel de expertos y responderemos sus preguntas.

 

Si has participado en alguna de nuestras teleasambleas en el pasado, sabes que esto es similar a un programa de entrevistas de radio y tienes la oportunidad de hacer preguntas en vivo. Si deseas escuchar en español, presiona * 0 en el teclado de tu teléfono ahora. Para aquellos de ustedes que se unen por teléfono, si desean hacer una pregunta, presionen * 3 en el teclado de su teléfono para comunicarse con un miembro del personal de AARP que anotará su nombre y pregunta, y los colocará en turno para hacer esa pregunta en vivo. Si te unes a través de Facebook o YouTube, puedes publicar tu pregunta en la sección de comentarios.

 

Hola, si acabas de unirte, soy Bill Walsh de AARP y quiero darte la bienvenida a esta importante discusión sobre la pandemia mundial de coronavirus. Estamos hablando con expertos líderes hoy y respondiendo tus preguntas en vivo. Para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono. Y si te unes a través de Facebook o YouTube, puedes publicar tu pregunta en los comentarios.

 

Hoy nos acompañan Steven C. Johnson, M.D., profesor de Medicina en la División de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la Facultad de Medicina de University of Colorado y del Centro Multidisciplinario sobre Envejecimiento en el Anschutz Medical Campus. Además, Lori Smetanka, directora ejecutiva de la National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, que es la principal organización nacional sin fines de lucro que defiende los derechos de los consumidores que reciben servicios de atención a largo plazo. Y finalmente, el Sr. Clarence Anthony, director ejecutivo de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, en representación de las ciudades de Estados Unidos. También nos acompañará mi colega de AARP, Jean Setzfand, quien ayudará a facilitar sus llamadas hoy.

 

Este evento se está siendo grabado, y podrán acceder a esa grabación en www.aarp.org/coronavirus 24 horas después de que terminemos. Nuevamente, para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en cualquier momento en el teclado de tu teléfono para conectarte con un miembro del personal de AARP. O si te unes a nosotros a través de Facebook o YouTube, coloca tu pregunta en los comentarios. Ahora me gustaría traer a nuestros invitados, cada uno de los cuales ya nos ha acompañado en eventos de teleasamblea previamente.

 

Entonces, estoy encantado de darles la bienvenida nuevamente. Primero, tenemos a Steven C. Johnson, M.D., profesor de Medicina en la División de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Colorado y el Centro Multidisciplinario sobre el Envejecimiento del Campus Médico Anschutz. El Dr. Johnson forma parte del panel de los Institutos Nacionales de Salud para el manejo de la COVID-19. Gracias por estar aquí de nuevo, Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Gracias, Bill. Encantado de estar aquí.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, encantados de recibirte. También tenemos a Lori Smetanka. Es la directora ejecutiva de la Voz Nacional del Consumidor para la Atención de Calidad a Largo Plazo. Esa organización es la principal organización nacional de defensa sin fines de lucro, que representa a los consumidores que reciben atención y servicios a largo plazo en hogares de ancianos, centros de vida asistida y entornos basados ​​en el hogar y la comunidad. Es la responsable de la dirección estratégica de la organización. Bienvenida de nuevo, Lori.

 

Lori Smetanka: Muchas gracias por invitarme de nuevo. Encantada de estar aquí.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Gracias. Y Clarence Anthony es el director ejecutivo de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, la voz de las ciudades, pueblos y aldeas de Estados Unidos, que representa a más de 200 millones de personas. Clarence comenzó su carrera en el servicio público como alcalde de South Bay, Florida. Gracias por acompañarnos, Clarence.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, muchas gracias por invitarme. Es un placer estar de regreso hoy.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Gracias por estar con nosotros. Comencemos con nuestra discusión. Y solo un recordatorio para nuestros oyentes. Para hacer su pregunta, presionen * 3 en el teclado de su teléfono. O pueden colocarla en la sección de comentarios en Facebook o YouTube. Dr. Johnson, comencemos por usted. Hemos escuchado el objetivo de la Administración de Biden de 100 millones de dosis de vacunas en los primeros 100 días. ¿Es eso factible, en su opinión? ¿Y qué se está haciendo para hacer realidad ese objetivo?

 

Steven Johnson: Gracias por esa pregunta. En primer lugar, creo que es factible. Y, de hecho, ha habido un par de días en los que la cantidad de vacunas distribuidas ha sido cercana al millón. Entonces, creo que se puede lograr. Creo que comienza, por supuesto, con el suministro de vacuna en sí.

 

El grado en que se pueden producir y distribuir las dos vacunas autorizadas es importante. Ciertamente, si algunas de las otras vacunas que están en estudio están disponibles bajo una autorización de uso de emergencia, y el suministro aumenta, eso sería genial. Creo que hay algunos problemas a nivel estatal. Creo que hemos reconocido que hay una diferencia entre la cantidad de vacunas que se han recibido y la cantidad que se ha administrado. Y parte de eso se ha relacionado con las prácticas estatales de retener dosis para asegurarse de que la segunda dosis de las vacunas Pfizer y Moderna estén disponible. Pero creo que debemos trabajar en la logística en términos de distribución.

 

Y luego creo que debemos trabajar en métodos para aumentar la administración a nivel estatal y local, lo que puede involucrar grandes eventos de vacunas. Puede implicar asistencia militar, cosas así. Creo que el objetivo es alcanzable, pero sería ideal tener un objetivo más alto porque 1 millón al día para una población de 331 millones, aún llevaría mucho tiempo implementar la vacuna.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bueno, gracias por eso. Permítanme cambiar de dirección un poco. Estamos escuchando noticias sobre una variante de COVID-19 más contagiosa. ¿Qué sabemos sobre eso? ¿Y cómo funcionarán las medidas preventivas actuales, como el uso de mascarillas y el distanciamiento social, frente a las nuevas variantes? ¿Y sabemos algo sobre la efectividad de las vacunas contra esas variantes?

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, comenzaría con algunos puntos básicos, y es que los virus mutan. Ellos cambian. Un buen ejemplo de eso es el virus de la influenza, donde tenemos que rediseñar una vacuna cada año en función de los cambios en la cepa. Pero los coronavirus también mutan, y realmente, hemos reconocido nuevas cepas desde el comienzo de la pandemia. Pero hay algunas cepas nuevas que son preocupantes. Probablemente hayas oído hablar de cepas del Reino Unido, Sudáfrica y Brasil.

 

Lo que parece que sabemos más en este momento es que son más transmisibles. Y, por supuesto, los virus que son más transmisibles significan que más personas se infectarán y luego las consecuencias de eso. Sabemos menos sobre cómo el virus afecta a las personas una vez infectadas. Hay algunos datos preliminares del Reino Unido de que estas variantes podrían ser más peligrosas que el coronavirus circulante original. Ahora, en términos de si las vacunas serán efectivas, creo que la sabiduría convencional en este momento es que seguirán siendo efectivas.

 

Las empresas y los investigadores han estado probando las respuestas de los anticuerpos a estas vacunas. Y en la mayoría de los casos, la vacuna parece funcionar. Aunque, es posible que hayan oído hablar de algunos en los que tal vez fueron menos efectivos. Pero las vacunas inducen una respuesta muy amplia del sistema inmunitario de cada cuerpo. Entonces, nuestra esperanza es que estas vacunas funcionen. Creo que es muy posible que, en el futuro, dentro de un año o dentro de dos años, tengamos que diseñar nuevas vacunas que reflejen mejor la cepa común que esté circulando.

 

Bill Walsh: Es un comentario aleccionador, pensar que esto estará con nosotros por otros dos años.

 

Steven Johnson: Bill, sin embargo, permíteme hacer otro punto. Esto realmente resalta la importancia de estas otras medidas en las que hemos llegado a confiar, en términos de mascarillas y distanciamiento social, etc. Es realmente doblemente importante, mientras aprendemos sobre estas variantes, que las personas no bajen la guardia en términos de estas otras medidas preventivas.

 

Bill Walsh: Y supongo que eso también se aplica a las personas que han recibido la vacuna.

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, estamos aprendiendo más sobre las personas que han recibido la vacuna. Nuestro consejo actual es que esas personas continúen usando las mismas prácticas que todos los demás para evitar la posibilidad de exposición y reinfección, que es posible. Y nuevamente, cuando administramos una vacuna que tiene un 95% de efectividad, eso todavía significa que 1 de cada 20 personas puede no haber respondido a la vacuna. Y en este momento, no sabemos quiénes son ese 5%.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias, Dr. Johnson. Lori Smetanka, me gustaría traerte aquí. ¿Por qué hemos visto retrasos en la entrega de vacunas a los residentes de hogares de ancianos y centros de vida asistida? Estas personas son posiblemente las más vulnerables. El 40% de las muertes por COVID se han producido en esos entornos. ¿En qué se diferencia de los programas disponibles para el público?

 

Lori Smetanka: Mmmm. Ha habido una serie de factores que creemos que están afectando la entrega de las vacunas a los residentes de estas instalaciones, incluidos algunos de los procesos que se utilizan para distribuir las vacunas en cada estado, el número variable de instalaciones y residentes que necesitan ser vacunados, e incluso cosas como la necesidad de obtener un consentimiento por adelantado para emitir la vacuna para algunos de los residentes que no pueden dar su consentimiento por sí mismos.

 

Es necesario que exista un acercamiento a los representantes legales u otras personas que puedan dar parte de ese consentimiento. Estos son algunos de los factores que han estado afectando esto. Muchos estados se han asociado con las farmacias, como saben, para vacunar a los residentes. Y dependen de clínicas o de diferentes procesos que están estableciendo esas farmacias. Tienen que organizarlos y hacer que la gente de las farmacias vaya a las instalaciones para organizar esas clínicas y luego organizar las vacunas para los residentes y el personal. Y cada instalación está programando múltiples clínicas, por lo que está tomando algo de tiempo.

 

Pero sabemos que los hogares de ancianos continúan siendo la máxima prioridad para la distribución de vacunas y que se la ofrecerán a todos los residentes y miembros del personal que estén dispuestos a aceptarla. Y tenemos la esperanza de que con algunas de las nuevas piezas puestas en marcha por el presidente Biden durante la última semana, por ejemplo, aumentando la producción a través de la Ley de Producción de Defensa, conectándose con diferentes entidades para ayudar en la distribución, esperamos que las dosis necesarias se dirigirán a todos los centros de atención a largo plazo lo antes posible.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bien, déjame hacerte una pregunta muy práctica. A lo largo de este proceso, las familias han tenido problemas para obtener información regular y precisa de los centros de enfermería. ¿Qué preguntas debe hacer la familia sobre el programa de vacunas en el hogar de ancianos de su ser querido? ¿Y a qué deberían recurrir si no obtienen las respuestas adecuadas?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, es importante que los residentes y las familias se mantengan tan involucrados e informados como puedan, y que las instalaciones les brinden información oportuna y precisa sobre lo que está sucediendo, no solo en relación con las vacunas, sino también con respecto a la COVID. Con las vacunas, estamos alentando a las personas a que hagan muchas preguntas sobre sus instalaciones. Y algunas cosas que pueden preguntar, por ejemplo, son, ¿cuándo se administrarán las vacunas? ¿Cuál es el proceso que se ha puesto en marcha? ¿Y cuál es el horario?

 

Y si, por alguna razón, el residente no puede hacerse ese tiempo, por ejemplo, personas que van a las visitas al médico, o algunas personas han sido hospitalizadas, ¿habrá días y horarios alternativos disponibles para que el residente sea vacunado? ¿Cómo obtendrá el hogar de ancianos el consentimiento para aquellas personas que no puedan darlo por sí mismas? ¿Y eso se puede arreglar con la mayor antelación posible antes de las clínicas que se están estableciendo?

 

Pregunte sobre las tasas de vacunación en el centro hasta el momento. ¿Y qué pasa si un residente opta por no vacunarse? ¿Se ofrecerá en el futuro si cambian de opinión y pueden vacunarse en algún momento en el futuro? Y también, pregunte qué tipo de procesos y protecciones se implementarán para proteger a todos los residentes, reconociendo que algunos residentes y personal se están negando en este momento a recibir la vacuna. Necesitamos asegurarnos de que las personas estarán protegidas.

 

Y si no obtienen respuestas satisfactorias a las preguntas, animamos a las personas a que hablen con la administración de la instalación. Pero también deben comunicarse con su programa de defensor del pueblo de atención a largo plazo para obtener ayuda. Y pueden encontrar un defensor del pueblo que defienda a los residentes en centros de atención a largo plazo. Pueden encontrar uno en su área visitando nuestro sitio web en www.theconsumervoice.org, todo en una sola palabra. Y allí pueden conseguir la información de contacto del defensor del pueblo local.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Y ese es un punto realmente importante para nuestros oyentes. Hay defensores del pueblo en todo el país. Y están ahí para ayudar a defenderlos en su nombre con los centros de atención a largo plazo. Esa dirección web que Lori acaba de proporcionar fue www.theconsumervoice.org. También hay una línea directa para el localizador de cuidados para ancianos. Ese número es 800-677-1116. Eso es 1-800-677-1116. Nuevamente, si tienes problemas con las instalaciones donde se encuentran tus seres queridos, llama a ese número. Solicita comunicarse con el defensor del pueblo. Y deberían ayudarte. Bien, gracias por eso, Lori.

 

Clarence, vamos contigo. Hemos escuchado muchas quejas de consumidores sobre no poder recibir una vacuna, o incluso sobre cómo inscribirse para vacunarse en algunos casos. ¿Cuáles son los desafíos a los que se enfrentan los Gobiernos locales en la distribución de la vacuna? ¿Y qué se está haciendo para abordarlos? ¿Y qué recursos locales necesitan los Gobiernos para ayudar?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Gracias de nuevo por invitarme. Creo que uno de los mayores desafíos para los Gobiernos locales y la mayoría de los funcionarios municipales es que no somos directamente responsables de la distribución en la mayoría de las ciudades de Estados Unidos porque no tenemos nuestros propios departamentos de salud. Pero, por lo general, trabajamos en colaboración con los funcionarios de nuestro condado para hacer llegar la información a nuestros residentes. Y lo único que estamos animando a hacer a nuestros socios, y lo están haciendo, es a defenderse.

 

Y Lori habló sobre las formas en que pueden tener acceso y también, si no obtienen la información que necesitan, ¿a dónde pueden ir? La mayoría de las veces, y el nivel de Gobierno más confiable, es el Gobierno local y las ciudades, pueblos y aldeas de todo Estados Unidos. Y lo que nos preocupa profundamente es que esa responsabilidad que tenemos como líderes confiables esté en riesgo porque no hemos podido poner el dinero directamente en manos de los líderes de la ciudad, para poder ayudarlos a tener acceso a la vacuna.

 

A mis alcaldes y concejales les preocupa mucho que las personas con mayor riesgo, que han sufrido de manera desproporcionada las infecciones por COVID, sufran enfermedades y muertes, especialmente en las poblaciones negras, indígenas y de color. Y muchos de ellos no han tenido acceso a la vacuna por varias razones. Pero puedo decirles que el sistema de salud y que el acceso y esta desconfianza en el día a día está provocando que nuestros residentes no se comuniquen tanto y reciban la inyección que sabemos que es fundamental para tener una vida sana y a largo plazo.

 

No hay duda de que existe una gran desconexión entre la oferta y la demanda y una falta de comprensión. Entonces, lo que estamos tratando de hacer es asegurarnos de sentarnos con esos trabajadores de la salud y de sentarnos con los departamentos de salud y los líderes estatales y compartir las preocupaciones de nuestras comunidades, nuestros residentes, para que puedan entender esas variables, y luego pueden superarlas.

 

Claramente, les diré, que la brecha tecnológica en el acceso es un gran desafío para la primera ronda de población de mayor edad en Estados Unidos. Estamos en primera línea. Nos lo tomamos en serio. Estamos presentes. Y eso es lo importante. Pero tenemos que asociarnos con los sistemas de salud pública de nuestros condados y estados.

 

Bill Walsh: Gracias, Clarence. Como la mayoría de nuestros oyentes sabrán, cada estado está manejando su programa de distribución de vacunas de maneras un poco diferentes. Un recurso que AARP ha creado para ayudar a las personas a comprender lo que está sucediendo donde viven está en nuestro sitio web. Hemos creado guías estado por estado. Pueden consultarlas en www.aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Simplemente elijes tu estado y obtendrás un resumen bastante fácil de leer de sus planes de distribución, números de teléfono útiles y también preguntas para hacerle a tus profesionales de la salud. Le agradezco a todos nuestros invitados. Y como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes… oh, continúa.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es muy importante tener ese tipo de información. Y les diré, hay ciudades como Dallas que tienen campos de registro donde la gente ingresa, que no tienen tecnología y tienen barreras idiomáticas. Por lo tanto, los líderes de la ciudad están trabajando con AARP, y AARP es un gran socio para obtener la información.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, bueno, gracias. Como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes, para hacer una pregunta, presiona n* 3. Responderemos esas preguntas muy pronto. Pero antes de hacerlo, quería traer a la vicepresidenta ejecutiva y directora de Activismo Legislativo y Compromiso de AARP, Nancy LeaMond. Bienvenida, Nancy.

 

Nancy LeaMond: Gracias, Bill. Gracias por invitarme.

 

Bill Walsh: Nancy, ¿qué está haciendo AARP para luchar por los mayores de 50 años a medida que se implementan las vacunas y para asegurarse de que sepan cómo recibir las vacunas en sus estados?

 

Nancy LeaMond: Bueno, durante meses, y en realidad parecen años, pero durante meses, AARP ha pedido que se tomen medidas para mejorar la salud y la seguridad económica de los adultos mayores en EE.UU. y de todas las personas en el país durante la pandemia. A medida que continúan aumentando el número de muertos, las tasas de hospitalización, el número de casos y el impacto económico de la pandemia, es un momento crítico para todos nosotros. Y aunque estamos viendo una enorme demanda de vacunas contra la COVID, sabemos que muchos de ustedes están increíblemente frustrados por no haber podido recibir la vacuna, o simplemente obtener información clara sobre cuándo podrán hacerlo. Y cuando buscan información [INAUDIBLE] simplemente en línea, necesitamos centros de llamadas 1-800 en cada estado, donde puedas hablar con alguien y obtener respuestas a tus preguntas. Esta es la tarea más importante a la que se enfrenta la nueva administración. No hay tiempo para retrasos ni obstáculos.

 

AARP está redoblando nuestros esfuerzos para brindar a las personas mayores de 50 años información confiable sobre las vacunas. De hecho, como acabas de mencionar, acabamos de publicar guías en línea para cada estado, en las que se explica cómo obtener vacunas en el lugar donde vives. Y los actualizaremos a medida que obtengamos más información. Continuamos luchando para que los adultos mayores tengan prioridad para recibir las vacunas contra la COVID-19 porque la ciencia ha demostrado claramente que las personas mayores tienen un mayor riesgo de muerte. Ha habido 420,000 muertes por COVID-19. Y el 95% de ellos han sido personas mayores de 50 años. El 40% de las muertes por COVID también han sido personas que viven y trabajan en hogares de ancianos, a pesar de ser solo el 1% de la población.

 

Ahora, a nivel federal, nos complació ver el enfoque de la Administración de Biden en la distribución de vacunas, incluida la protección de los residentes y el personal de atención a largo plazo que han sido devastados por esta pandemia. Y también instamos a que las vacunas estén disponibles a través de los centros móviles de vacunas para aquellos que están atrapados en sus hogares. También estamos agradecidos de ver propuestas para nuevos pagos de estímulo económico, fondos adicionales para asistencia nutricional, licencia por enfermedad y familiar paga para mantener a las familias saludables, y ayuda a los Gobiernos estatales y locales que se han visto tan afectados por esta crisis. Instamos a una acción federal rápida sobre estas políticas.

 

AARP también ha sido muy activa a nivel estatal. Nuestros comprometidos voluntarios de 16 oficinas estatales de AARP están participando en grupos de trabajo formales dirigidos por sus gobernadores y departamentos de salud estatales. Esto incluye Idaho, Carolina del Norte, Tennessee, California y muchos otros. Y los defensores de AARP en cada estado están instando a los gobernadores y legisladores estatales a mejorar la información y la coordinación sobre el lanzamiento de la vacuna contra la COVID-19.

 

Mientras tanto, abogamos por proteger programas como servicios para personas mayores, atención domiciliaria y comunitaria, asistencia energética para personas de bajos ingresos y programas de asistencia laboral y de desempleo. Nada de este trabajo, luchar por nuestros casi 38 millones de miembros, sería posible sin la dedicación y pasión del personal, los voluntarios y los defensores de base de AARP en todo el país. Y sabemos que muchos de ellos están en esta llamada hoy.

 

Para mantenerte actualizado sobre todos estos esfuerzos y encontrar resúmenes de los planes estatales para la distribución de vacunas, visita www.aarp.org/elcoronavirus. Muchas gracias. Gracias, Bill, y gracias a todos nuestros panelistas expertos.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muchas gracias por esa actualización, Nancy. Y como recordatorio para nuestros oyentes, para hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3. Ahora es el momento de abordar sus preguntas sobre el coronavirus con el Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka y Clarence Anthony. Presiona * 3 en cualquier momento en el teclado de tu teléfono para conectarte con un miembro del personal de AARP y compartir tu pregunta. Ahora me gustaría traer a mi colega de AARP, Jean Setzfand, para ayudar a facilitar sus llamadas hoy. Bienvenida, Jean.

 

Jean Setzfand: Muchas gracias, Bill. Encantada de estar aquí para esta importante conversación.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, ¿quién es el primero en la línea?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra primera llamada es de Celestine de Míchigan.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Celestine. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con la llamada.

 

Celestine: Quería hacer una pregunta. Tengo 75 años y he estado tratando de averiguar cuándo podré ponerme esa vacuna.

 

Bill Walsh: ¿Cuándo podrá recibir la vacuna?

 

Celestine: Sí, estoy en Míchigan, Burton.

 

Bill Walsh: Bueno, muy bien. Dr. Johnson, ¿quiere abordar eso?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, con gusto. Gracias por la pregunta. Estoy más familiarizado con mi estado natal de Colorado. Ciertamente, la edad de 75 años encaja en una de las prioridades de la guía de los CDC sobre quién debe vacunarse. Y ciertamente lo estamos haciendo para las personas mayores de 70 años. En realidad, otros estados lo están haciendo para personas mayores de 65 años. Sin duda, debería calificar para una vacuna temprana. Parte de la pregunta, y Bill, tal vez AARP tiene algunos recursos para Míchigan, es una especie de método.

 

Por ejemplo, en Colorado tenemos una línea directa de vacunas a la que las personas pueden llamar para que puedan ser emparejadas con los proveedores que están proporcionando la vacuna. Mencionaré que solo en nuestro sistema de salud aquí, tenemos 100,000 personas mayores de 70 años. Por lo tanto, incluso las personas que son una prioridad, puede llevar varias semanas. Pero ciertamente necesitas estar en una lista para recibir una vacuna. Y no sé si alguno de nuestros otros expertos puede brindar más consejos locales sobre cómo manejar eso en Míchigan.

 

Bill Walsh: Clarence, ¿tienes alguna recomendación para Celestine sobre los recursos locales a los que podría contactar?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. En realidad, volvía a tu recomendación, en primer lugar. Sí incluye una de las barreras, y es tratar de volver atrás y mirar los sitios web estatales para identificar dónde se puede acceder a la vacuna. La otra cosa es, una vez más, vuelve al uso de la tecnología, poder hacer cosas simples como pedirles a sus hijos, un vecino o un miembro de la familia que lo ayuden a acceder en línea para recibir la vacuna, porque la mayoría de las veces, tienes que registrarte para obtener una cita, lo que, de nuevo, puede ser una barrera para algunos. Y creo que la otra cosa es acceder a parte de la información del departamento de salud del condado y ver si pueden ayudarte a registrarte. Lo que está planteando Celestine es claramente un problema de coordinación e información porque no hay duda de que debería estar en ese primer nivel de prioridad. Espero que tenga ese sistema de apoyo a su alrededor.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro.

 

Steven Johnson: Bill, solo iba a decir, otro recurso sería su médico local. Ciertamente cumplo ese papel para todos mis pacientes que me llaman. Y puedo indicarles cómo pueden inscribirse en la lista, etc., por ejemplo, a la línea directa de vacunas. Entonces, si Celestine tiene un médico de atención primaria, imagino que sería una fuente de consejo.

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una muy buena sugerencia. Y mientras hablamos, nuestro excelente personal aquí en AARP ha buscado las pautas para Míchigan. Y tengo un par de consejos para ti, Celestine. Puedes llamar al Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de Míchigan. Tienen un número gratuito para averiguar si eres elegible y cómo reservar una cita. Ese número es 888-535-6136. Eso es 888-535-6136. O puedes enviarles un correo electrónico a covid19@michigan.gov. También vemos aquí que, en Míchigan, las personas mayores de 65 años son elegibles para vacunarse primero. Eso suena como una buena noticia para ti, Celestine. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Myriam de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Myriam. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Myriam: Ahora que estoy escuchando toda esta información, estoy un poco inquieta de querer ir a un hogar. Los dos somos ancianos, mi esposo y yo. Tenemos 90 años. Y tenemos que salir de nuestra casa e ingresar a un hogar de salud. La pregunta es, ¿cómo se supone que voy a entrar en un hogar, un hogar para personas mayores, si todo esto está sucediendo?

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una excelente pregunta. Lori, ¿puedes abordar eso para Myriam y otras personas que podrían estar interesadas?

 

Lori Smetanka: Claro. Sé que ha sido una gran preocupación para las personas a lo largo de esta pandemia, pensar si necesita ayuda adicional o si está buscando mudarse a una residencia de vida asistida o para personas mayores donde puede obtener algunos servicios adicionales. Y creo que debes hacer preguntas antes de ingresar a una instalación, que podría ayudar a determinar, en primer lugar, si tal vez podrías recibir algunos servicios en tu propia casa. Tal vez tu Agencia local sobre el Envejecimiento pueda trabajar contigo para ayudarte a evaluar si realmente puedes lograr que las personas vengan a tu propia casa y te brinden apoyo adicional.

 

Pero si crees que estás pensando en mudarte a otra residencia donde puedas obtener algunos servicios adicionales, haz preguntas sobre cómo están manejando la crisis de COVID. Pregunta qué protecciones están implementando para sus residentes allí y cómo se aseguran de que ellos y el personal estén protegidos. ¿Tienen suficientes personas disponibles para brindar servicios? ¿Tienen suficientes equipos de protección y mascarillas para todos, por ejemplo? ¿Y cuáles son las tasas de vacunación que hay? Para que sepas si otros residentes y personal están siendo vacunados o no. Y también, pregunta sobre cualquier brote relacionado con COVID. Puedes encontrar que algunos de los lugares que estás viendo no han tenido brotes. Y es más probable que dirijas tu atención a esos antes que a otros. Pero hacer preguntas, creo, es una muy buena idea.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muchas gracias, Lori. Y gracias, Myriam, por esa pregunta. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Karen de Wisconsin.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Karen. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Karen: Sí. Mi pregunta está relacionada con la vacuna en sí. Si alguien en su hogar ha recibido la vacuna, ¿es posible que, en los pocos días posteriores a la inyección, transmita el virus a otras personas en el hogar?

 

Bill Walsh: Pregunta interesante. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede responder esa pregunta de Karen?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esa es una excelente pregunta. Las dos vacunas que están disponibles, y realmente, las otras tres o cuatro vacunas que se encuentran en estados avanzados de desarrollo, ninguna de ellas son vacunas vivas. No hay riesgo de que alguien que reciba la vacuna transmita el virus a otras personas.

 

Sin embargo, existe la duda de si la vacuna protege completamente contra la infección o si evita que más personas se enfermen. Una de las preguntas sin respuesta es, si alguien recibe una vacuna, y dentro de un mes se expone a la COVID-19, ¿podría adquirir tal vez una infección más leve y luego transmitirla? Pero en términos de las secuelas inmediatas de la vacuna, no hay riesgo de que nada de la vacuna se transmita a otras personas.

 

Bill Walsh: Supongo, sin embargo, que habla del punto que estabas haciendo antes sobre la necesidad de un distanciamiento social continuo y el uso de mascarillas, incluso una vez que te hayas vacunado.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que ese es el consejo principal. Hay una comunicación reciente de los CDC sobre los trabajadores de la salud que no necesariamente necesitan ponerse en cuarentena durante dos semanas completas si han recibido la vacuna. Esa es una pequeña información que es un poco diferente. Pero creo que hasta que sepamos más, nos gustaría que las medidas que todos han tomado para evitar la adquisición de COVID-19 hasta ahora continúen exactamente de la misma manera después de sus vacunas, hasta que sepamos más.

 

Bill Walsh: Y sé que la ciencia todavía es poco clara en esto, Dr. Johnson, pero ¿tenemos una idea de cuánta protección le brinda la primera dosis? Obviamente, la FDA recomienda que las personas reciban dos dosis de estas dos primeras vacunas. ¿Cuánta protección tienen las personas si acaban de recibir una vacuna?

 

Steven Johnson: Creemos que una dosis proporciona cierta protección. Y en los estudios iniciales de la vacuna Pfizer, las personas que estaban a 10 días de su primera dosis parecían tener un riesgo bajo de desarrollar una infección. Pero no sabemos hasta qué punto protege esa primera dosis, ni cuánto tiempo protege. A menudo, una dosis de refuerzo está destinada no solo a fortalecer el sistema inmunitario, sino también a prolongar el tiempo de protección. Y si has seguido las noticias, el país de Israel ha sido muy agresivo en el despliegue de la vacuna, y de hecho, han informado que creen que algunas de las personas que han recibido una dosis de la vacuna han adquirido COVID-19 entre las dos dosis. Entonces, me gustaría que la gente viera esa primera dosis como importante, pero también la segunda como esencial.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien. Bueno, gracias. Myriam, no sé si todavía estás en la línea, pero quería mencionar un recurso para ti y otras personas que tenían preguntas sobre la COVID y los hogares de ancianos y centros de vida asistida. AARP ha creado un recurso en línea para que puedas ver los detalles de cada instalación, o al menos la mayoría de ellas en todo el país. Y eso está en www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Hay un pequeño resumen de cada una de las instalaciones en todo el país, o al menos aquellas que están reportando datos. Y podría darte una idea del nivel de las tasas de infección en varias instalaciones y las precauciones que están tomando. Bien, Jean, volvamos a los teléfonos. ¿Quién es nuestro próximo interlocutor?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Dorothy de Massachusetts.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Dorothy. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Dorothy: Mi pregunta es, hay muchos de nosotros que no tenemos una computadora. Soy mayor. Tengo 87 años. Mi marido tiene 90 años. Los dos somos discapacitados y nadie ha hablado siquiera de qué hacer con las personas que no pueden salir de casa. Somos muchos los que todavía vivimos en casa y no se ha considerado enviar a alguien para que nos cuide, porque no podemos ir a sentarnos durante dos o tres horas. Apenas podemos estar de pie. Y ese es un gran problema, creo, para las personas mayores, y no ha habido ninguna pregunta al respecto. Gracias.

 

Bill Walsh: Déjame preguntarte, Dorothy. ¿Has recibido información sobre la vacuna? ¿Te has apuntado ya a alguna lista?

 

Dorothy: No, no lo hemos hecho. Ni siquiera pudimos hacernos pruebas porque las filas eran demasiado largas, tres o cuatro horas en el coche, era simplemente imposible.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo. Te escucho. Clarence, ¿puedes responder la pregunta de Dorothy? Creo que es una pregunta que tiene mucha gente.

 

Clarence: Sí, estoy de acuerdo con Dorothy. Esa es una de las barreras que estamos viendo con el sitio web de los departamentos de salud, el acceso a la tecnología. Creo que lo importante es levantar el teléfono y llamar a su departamento de salud local y asegurarse de que sepan que calificas y que... Tienen programas que realmente te ayudarían a vacunarte o te pondrían en línea para poder conseguirlo. Creo que ciudades como Nueva York, y esa no es una ciudad de tamaño común de ninguna manera, pero tienen un programa de transporte de vacuna para todos que ayuda a las personas de 65 años o más, llevándolas a los sitios de vacunación y no tienen que esperar, si no que las hacen pasar derecho por el lugar.

 

La ciudad de Tallahassee, Florida, ofrece autobuses hacia y desde el sitio de vacunación. Y ese tipo de cosas son realmente útiles. Pero sí creo que hay casos especiales que tendremos que considerar, y son aquellos que no pueden hacer fila. No pueden salir durante dos horas. Y muchos de los departamentos de salud y estados están comenzando a considerar esos programas. Pero en este momento, esa es la barrera más grande que estamos viendo a nivel nacional.

 

Bill Walsh: Correcto. Bien, gracias, Clarence. Y Dorothy, mientras Clarence hablaba, nuestro excelente personal de AARP estaba buscando información sobre Massachusetts y descubrió un par de cosas. Lo primero es que, a partir del 1 de febrero, las personas de 75 años o más en Massachusetts podrán programar una cita para recibir la vacuna. También tenemos un número para que llames. Es el Departamento de Salud de Massachusetts. Ese número es 617-624-6000. Eso es 617-624-6000, el Departamento de Salud de Massachusetts. Deberían poder darte información sobre dónde ir y cómo inscribirse para recibir la vacuna en Massachusetts. Bien, Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Eileen de California.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Eileen. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Eileen: Oh.

 

Bill Walsh: Eileen, ¿estás con nosotros?

 

Eileen: Hola. Tengo 95 años, tengo 17 medicamentos diferentes a los que soy alérgica y me preguntaba si debería ponerme esa inyección o no.

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una muy buena pregunta. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede abordar eso para Eileen y otras personas que tienen alergias a los medicamentos?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por tu pregunta. Y eso en realidad ha sido bien estudiado hasta ahora. Afortunadamente, tanto con la vacuna Pfizer como con la vacuna Moderna, el riesgo de una reacción alérgica es muy bajo. Al decir eso, ha habido algunas reacciones alérgicas. Y uno de los riesgos de una reacción alérgica son las personas que tienen antecedentes de varias alergias. Pero la única contraindicación real para la vacuna es si eres alérgica a los componentes de la vacuna.

 

Y la vacuna, además del material genético del virus, el ARN mensajero, hay algunas grasas que llamamos lípidos, y algunas otras sustancias químicas y así sucesivamente. En nuestro centro, hemos estado vacunando habitualmente a personas que tienen antecedentes de alergias. Y la única precaución adicional es que las personas con alergias sean monitoreadas en la clínica un poco más. La mayoría de las personas, una vez que han recibido la vacuna, pueden irse después de 15 minutos. Pero la recomendación es para las personas que tienen múltiples alergias, que esperen 30 minutos. Una reacción alérgica es algo que podemos manejar. Y todavía siento que los beneficios de la vacuna COVID-19 superan con creces los riesgos.

 

Bill Walsh: Para Eileen, ¿le recomendaría que se registre para recibir la vacuna y le diga a la persona que le está aplicando la inyección que "Soy alérgica a estos 17 medicamentos" para avisarles y que puedan observarla?

 

Steven Johnson: Creo que es una gran idea. Y de hecho creo que eso sucedería de todos modos. Cuando vas por tu vacuna, una de las partes rutinarias del asesoramiento es mirar tu lista de alergias. Y si hay algo en esa lista de alergias que preocupe, el personal sanitario debería detectarlo. Pero creo que puedes ayudar asegurándote de que tu lista de alergias esté completa e informando al proveedor de atención médica que administra la vacuna sobre esas alergias.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Gracias, Dr. Johnson. Jean, tomemos otra llamada.

 

Jean Setzfand: Suena bien. Tenemos muchas llamadas. También tenemos muchas preguntas en YouTube que he estado posponiendo, así que déjame ir por ellas. Linda de YouTube está haciendo una pregunta similar. He escuchado que uno no debe tomar medicamentos antiinflamatorios, como Aspirina, Advil, Motrin, antes de tomar la vacuna. ¿Pueden aclarar? Y si es así, ¿qué tan pronto después de recibir la vacuna puedes tomar esos medicamentos?

 

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por esa pregunta. Quiero asegurarme de que respondamos esto correctamente. Hubo... Esto está un poco fuera de tema, pero hubo preocupación en un momento de que los agentes antiinflamatorios pudieran tener un resultado adverso en las personas cuando desarrollan COVID-19. Y eso realmente ha sido refutado. En términos de agentes antiinflamatorios alrededor de la vacuna, si no es necesario tomar esos medicamentos adicionales, creo que es razonable no tomarlos.

 

Los medicamentos antiinflamatorios que más nos preocuparían serían los medicamentos de tipo esteroide porque los esteroides pueden debilitar su sistema inmunitario y, en consecuencia, pueden disminuir tu respuesta a la vacuna. Esos pueden ser medicamentos como prednisona o hidrocortisona, otros esteroides, etc. El otro problema que surge es si puedes usar antiinflamatorios o analgésicos después de la vacuna, solo porque pueden ocurrir algunos efectos secundarios, como dolor en el brazo y fiebre, etc.

 

Mi consejo es que las personas no se sientan enfermas, pero en general, les aconsejo que usen un medicamento como el acetaminofén, o algo así, para lidiar con los efectos secundarios relacionados con la vacuna. Pero el principal problema antiinflamatorio antes de la vacuna serían los esteroides.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias. Jean, tomemos otra pregunta.

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Frank de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Frank. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Frank: Mi mamá tiene unos 90 años. Sé que van a ir a los hogares de ancianos para vacunar a los residentes. Si ella se niega a vacunarse y yo tengo un poder notarial, ¿puedo anular eso para obligarlos a vacunarla? Y después del hecho, ¿cómo hacemos para ponerle la vacuna? Cuando digo “después del hecho” me refiero a van, les daban la vacuna a los pacientes, y ella no tiene eso. ¿Cómo nos ocupamos de eso?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien, Frank. Lori, ¿quieres abordar esa pregunta?

 

Lori Smetanka: Claro. Creo que si su madre está preocupada por la vacuna, creo que deberíamos intentar obtener su información sobre la seguridad de la misma y por qué es una buena idea que la reciba. Si es competente y capaz de tomar sus propias decisiones, entonces ciertamente deberías poder hacerlo. Y sabemos que para muchas personas, si dudan en colocarse la vacuna, muchas veces, educar ha sido el factor que los anima a reconsiderar y realmente a recibirla. Por lo tanto, si te preocupa su voluntad de vacunarse, tendría una buena conversación con ella y le pediría al personal que hable con ella o su médico sobre por qué es importante vacunarse.

 

Para las personas que pueden negarse la primera vez que se llevan a cabo las clínicas, las farmacias o cualquiera que sea el proceso en los hogares de ancianos, debería haber oportunidades en fechas posteriores para que las personas reciban la vacuna. Y te alentaríamos a que hables con la administración de la instalación sobre cómo se asegurarán de que las personas que tal vez más adelante cambien de opinión o quieran vacunarse, o incluso para las personas nuevas que ingresan, que la recibirán. Entonces, conversa con tu madre. Habla con el administrador y su médico sobre cuáles pueden ser los procesos y cómo asegurarse de que pueda vacunarse si lo necesita.

 

Bill Walsh: Bien, gracias por eso, Lori. Y gracias por todas esas buenas preguntas. Pronto responderemos más preguntas. Recuerda, para hacer una pregunta, y presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono para ingresar a la cola. Me gustaría acudir a nuestros expertos. Clarence, has escuchado en muchas de las llamadas que hemos recibido hasta ahora, la gente está teniendo problemas para averiguar por dónde empezar a inscribirse para la vacuna. ¿Cuál es tu consejo? ¿Cuál es el primer punto de contacto en el que las personas deberían pensar en sus comunidades si quieren comunicarse y averiguar cómo recibir la vacuna? Y supongamos que es posible que no tengan acceso a Internet.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es un desafío que estamos viendo ahora mismo en todo Estados Unidos. Mi primer punto de recomendación, como el Dr. Johnson compartió en cierto modo es que, me gusta la idea de hablar con tu médico para ver si tienen información o si pueden, mientras estás allí, acceder a dónde puedes encontrar esa información.

 

Volveré nuevamente a decirles que su ayuntamiento, el departamento de salud de su condado, es un lugar que está allí para orientarte y brindarte esa información. Lo que estamos viendo, en términos de nuestros alcaldes y concejales en todo Estados Unidos, es que se están asociando con grupos vecinales, asociaciones, organizaciones sin fines de lucro. La YMCA tiene un gran programa. Y, por supuesto, AARP tiene un gran programa para educar a todas las comunidades.

 

La única comunidad, de nuevo, que todavía está desequilibrada para mí y tiene mayor necesidad, son algunas de las comunidades más pobres y de personas de color. Pero los sitios de vacunación no están ahí. Tenemos que concentrarnos y tenemos que gestionar ese tipo de acceso porque la gente de color lo contrae tres y cuatro veces más y se muere porque no tiene acceso. Entonces, nuestros alcaldes y miembros del consejo, los líderes de la ciudad se están asociando con todos para tratar de obtener información.

 

Bill Walsh: Bueno, ese es un punto muy interesante. Iba a tocar eso a continuación. ¿Cuánto está viendo en términos de alcance a esas comunidades de todo el país? ¿Y estamos viendo mucha resistencia a vacunarse? Sé que en algunas comunidades de color existe cierta renuencia histórica a confiar en el establecimiento médico.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Bueno, la Liga Nacional de Ciudades está trabajando en una iniciativa con la directora ejecutiva de AARP, la Sra. Jenkins, que vamos a salir y comenzaremos a hablar sobre educación sobre la vacuna. No estamos hablando de que debas o no debas, porque creo que esas experiencias históricas que los estadounidenses negros han tenido con tantas cosas, no solo históricas, sino incluso mirando hoy, que estamos arrojando luz sobre las desigualdades. Y hay una falta de confianza en este momento.

 

Entonces, nuestro objetivo aquí es simplemente contar los datos de la vacuna y compartir, si tienes ciertos problemas de salud, es posible que esto no te afecte. Aún debes vacunarte, como ha indicado el Dr. Johnson. Creo que ese es un primer paso. Pero también debemos reconocer las limitaciones de transporte. Y nuevamente, cuando hablamos de poblaciones de 65 años o más, hay mucho por educar. Y creo que dependerá de todos, de la comunidad médica y cada parte de nuestra comunidad, lograr que la gente confíe en que esta vacuna es segura y que si desea vivir una vida de calidad, es importante recibirla.

 

Bill Walsh: Sí. Bueno, gracias, Clarence. Y, como mencionaste, AARP está haciendo todo lo posible para conocer los hechos sobre la vacuna. Si deseas saber cómo recibir la vacuna cerca de donde vives, visita www.aarp.org/coronavirus. Tenemos una herramienta allí donde puedes elegir tu estado y ver cuáles son sus pautas estatales locales. Si no tienes acceso a Internet, creo que Clarence dio buenos consejos. Llama a tu médico. Ese es un buen primer paso. Llama a tu departamento de salud local o estatal. O llama a tus funcionarios electos locales. Es por eso por lo que los elegimos, para ayudarnos a servirnos y asegurarnos de que, en tiempos de crisis, obtengamos las respuestas que todos necesitamos.

 

Permítame volver a hablar con usted, Dr. Johnson. Como hizo referencia Clarence, la COVID-19 ha tenido un impacto devastador en nuestros adultos mayores y personas de color. ¿Qué se está haciendo para proteger a quienes corren mayor riesgo en la pandemia? ¿Están siendo priorizados en la distribución de vacunas?

 

Steven Johnson: Permítanme comenzar con la edad. Creo que las personas mayores de cierta edad han sido una gran prioridad. Los trabajadores de la salud formaron parte de la fase inicial, los residentes del hogar de ancianos y el personal. Pero realmente, justo después de eso ha habido personas mayores de cierta edad. Como mencioné, los diferentes estados están usando diferentes límites de edad. En Colorado, estamos usando la edad de 70 en este momento. Lo que hemos aprendido es que este grupo de más de 70 años es realmente un grupo muy grande. Por lo tanto, aunque prioricemos a las personas, puede llevar semanas con la infraestructura y el suministro de vacunas actuales para que esta población esté completamente vacunada. Esa ha sido una gran prioridad.

 

Creo que es un conjunto de cuestiones más difíciles con respecto a las personas de color, y me gustaría que mis colegas también intervinieran en esto, porque creo que se trata de una cuestión multifactorial. Por un lado, ciertas personas de color pueden correr un mayor riesgo de exposición a la COVID-19 según las condiciones de vida, las circunstancias laborales, etc. Pero ese es un grupo que también puede tener menos acceso a la atención médica y puede tener algunos problemas de confianza, puede tener más dudas sobre las vacunas.

 

Creo que hemos visto tasas más bajas de vacunación. Sé que nuestros Gobiernos estatales y locales en Colorado están reconociendo esto como un problema. Es decir, a pesar de tener pautas sobre la edad, ciertas personas de color no se vacunan tan rápidamente como otras.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Déjame hacer un rápido seguimiento de eso. Todos hemos escuchado mucho sobre las vacunas Pfizer y Moderna que se están distribuyendo ahora. ¿Qué sabemos acerca de las otras candidatas, como AstraZeneca y Johnson & Johnson? ¿Ayudarán a garantizar un suministro suficiente? ¿Y qué sabemos de su eficacia?

 

Steven Johnson: Lo notable de las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer es que no solo son muy efectivas, sino que sus resultados son muy similares. Y son tan similares que nos sentimos cómodos recomendando a las personas que si se les ofrece una u otra, deberían recibir cualquiera de los dos porque la tasa de efectividad es aproximadamente del 95%, el potencial de efectos secundarios es similar, y así sucesivamente.

 

Se vuelve un poco diferente cuando hablamos de otras vacunas. Ya sabemos bastante sobre la vacuna AstraZeneca, que no es una vacuna viva, pero es una tecnología diferente a las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer. Y hay resultados más mixtos en términos de efectividad. Hay ciertos subgrupos que tienen una mayor tasa de éxito que otros. Por lo tanto, no es tan preciso como los datos de las vacunas Moderna y Pfizer. Como algunos de ustedes sabrán, la vacuna AstraZeneca se está utilizando en otros países, incluido el Reino Unido. La vacuna Johnson & Johnson es una tecnología muy similar a la vacuna AstraZeneca. Nuevamente, no es una vacuna viva. Lo emocionante de esa vacuna es que es una sola dosis. Y si tiene éxito, por supuesto, será mucho más eficiente que una serie de dos dosis.

 

Realmente esperamos tener esos resultados en cualquier momento. Creo que le dije de broma a Bill que podríamos saber algo durante la hora del programa. Es sorprendente lo rápido que se obtienen los resultados con la COVID-19. Pero deberíamos saber eso pronto. Y una vez que conozcamos los resultados, sabremos el impacto que tendrá en la cadena de suministro. Otra vacuna de la que somos parte aquí en University of Colorado es la vacuna Novavax, que es una tecnología diferente. Me alienta la cantidad de vacunas candidatas. Y, con suerte, estos candidatos posteriores serán tan exitosos como las dos vacunas que estamos usando actualmente.

 

Bill Walsh: Seguro que eso esperamos. Y si una de esas vacunas obtiene la aprobación, o vemos algunos datos sobre eso durante la llamada, lo anunciaremos aquí a nuestros oyentes en vivo. Escuchen, para nuestros oyentes, quiero mencionar algo. Estamos viendo un par de consultas de personas que dicen: "Estoy esperando que mi médico me llame sobre la vacuna". Este no es el momento para esperar a que tu médico llame. Este es un momento para valerse por sí mismo. No esperes a que suene el teléfono. Necesitas comunicarte para colocarte en la lista. Si eres un cuidador, comunícate en nombre de tus seres queridos. Este es un momento para abogar por ti mismo y por tus seres queridos porque sabemos que estos Gobiernos locales están luchando con la divulgación y la información. Por lo tanto, toma la responsabilidad de obtener la información que necesitas.

 

De acuerdo, Lori, quería preguntarte sobre los hogares de ancianos y las instalaciones de vida asistida. Hemos escuchado una enorme frustración de nuestros miembros por no poder ver a sus seres queridos, estar en contacto con ellos. ¿En qué momento crees que esas instalaciones pueden comenzar a aliviar las restricciones que han establecido? ¿Y crees que algunas de esas precauciones serán permanentes?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, estas son preguntas realmente geniales y también las escuchamos mucho de nuestros miembros, y son preguntas que nos hemos estado planteando. Todavía estamos tratando de obtener respuestas completas a esta pregunta de las agencias gubernamentales que han establecido las restricciones de visitas y hemos estado hablando con la agencia federal que supervisa los hogares de ancianos, los Centros de Servicios de Medicare y Medicaid. Y han indicado que revisarán la guía de visitas y posiblemente lo harán ahora que se distribuyen las vacunas. Pero no sabemos cuándo ni cómo será.

 

Continuamos abogando ante el Gobierno federal, con los legisladores y estamos trabajando con socios como AARP para establecer visitas seguras en las instalaciones lo antes posible, porque sabemos que los residentes y las familias están extremadamente frustrados por la prohibición actual. Quieren reunirse con sus seres queridos. Y también sabemos que las familias brindan mucho apoyo y cuidado a los miembros de la familia residentes que viven en centros de atención a largo plazo, porque demasiados centros no tienen suficiente personal disponible a diario para brindar atención. Ese ha sido un factor realmente importante.

 

Pero mientras tanto, en este momento, los centros de atención a largo plazo deben hacer todo lo posible para garantizar que se implementen las prácticas adecuadas de control de infecciones, que estén evaluando continuamente cómo pueden ofrecer visitas seguras, incluso ahora mismo, entre residentes y familias y deben trabajar para satisfacer las necesidades de cada residente. Muchas familias califican para visitas de cuidado esencial o visitas de cuidado compasivo. Y el objetivo es lograr que la mayor cantidad de miembros de la familia regresen lo antes posible y que se levanten las restricciones lo antes posible.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, gracias, Lori. Y nuevamente, oyentes, no tengan vergüenza de acercarse a los hogares de ancianos y las instalaciones de vida asistida donde residen sus seres queridos y hacerles preguntas difíciles. Quiero repetir un excelente recurso que AARP creó sobre lo que sucede dentro de los hogares de ancianos. Eso es www.aarp.org/nursinghomedashboard. Ve allí para obtener información sobre las tasas de infección en los hogares de ancianos donde residen tus seres queridos, las precauciones que se están tomando. Pero por supuesto, si tienes preguntas, levanta el teléfono y llámalos y defiende a tus seres queridos. Muchas gracias, Lori. Y gracias a todos nuestros invitados.

 

Pronto llegaremos a más preguntas de los oyentes. Pero quería dar una actualización rápida de alerta de la Red contra el Fraude, de AARP. A medida que continúa el lanzamiento de la vacuna contra el coronavirus, los estafadores buscan formas de aprovecharse. Están llamando, enviando correos electrónicos y mensajes de texto, y colocando anuncios falsos para convencer a las personas de que pueden saltar al frente de la cola de vacunas por una tarifa, o proporcionando su número de seguro social u otra información personal confidencial.

 

Sepan que cualquier oferta para saltarse la cola de vacunas es una estafa. Siempre recurran a recursos confiables, como tu médico o el departamento de salud local, para obtener orientación sobre la distribución de la vacuna. Visita www.aarp.org/fraude. Eso es www.aarp.org/fraude, para obtener más información sobre estas y otras estafas. O puede llamar a nuestra línea de ayuda de La Red contra el Fraude al 877-908-3360.

 

Ahora es el momento de abordar más preguntas con el Dr. Johnson, Lori Smetanka y Clarence Anthony. Como recordatorio, presiona * 3 en el teclado de tu teléfono en cualquier momento para comunicarte con un miembro del personal de AARP y entrar en la cola para hacer esa pregunta en vivo. Jean, ¿a quién tenemos en la línea ahora?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestro próximo interlocutor es Paul de Pensilvania.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Paul. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Paul: Gracias. Sí, gracias por atender mi llamada. Tengo 71 años. Todavía no me han vacunado, pero ciertamente estoy deseando hacerlo. Y me preguntaba si después de la vacunación, ¿tendré que seguir usando una mascarilla? ¿Y todavía tendré que evitar las reuniones, como las reuniones familiares, incluso si todos los asistentes han sido vacunados o han tenido COVID?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Dr. Johnson, creo que ya hemos tocado este tema antes. ¿Podrías reiterar tu guía para Paul y para otras personas que se estaban preguntando sobre eso?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, gracias por tu pregunta, Paul. No sabemos con precisión quiénes son los subgrupos que no están protegidos con la vacuna, primero. Número dos, no estamos seguros de cuánto dura la protección. Y número tres, no estamos seguros de si la vacuna previene la enfermedad y aún permite la infección. Creo que lo que recomendaría, de hecho, escuché al Dr. Fauci anoche en la televisión hablar de eso, es que la disponibilidad de la vacuna y recibir la vacuna en este momento no debería alterar las otras medidas preventivas que estamos tomando.

 

No aflojaría ninguna de las estrategias que ha utilizado hasta ahora para evitar la COVID-19. Ahora, dentro de 6 meses, o dentro de 12 meses, cuando sepamos un poco más sobre los efectos de la vacuna y conozcamos el estado de la pandemia, es posible que tengamos otros consejos. Pero ciertamente queremos errar a favor de la precaución, que la gente use las mismas medidas.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence, de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, me pregunto si estás viendo ejemplos de alcaldes en todo el país que están dando ese ejemplo de distanciamiento social y uso de mascarillas para las personas que viven en sus jurisdicciones.

 

Clarence Anthony: Campaña [INAUDIBLE], por así decirlo, durante los últimos 10 u 11 meses. Y existe este reconocimiento que es importante tener tu mascarilla, practicar el distanciamiento social y lavarse las manos. Y creo que algunos han sido atrapados sin hacerlo teniendo reuniones familiares y saliendo a cenar. Y lo que ha sido positivo es que la respuesta de la comunidad es que estás diciendo que deberíamos hacer eso, pero no lo estás haciendo. Entonces, creo que los líderes locales están diciendo: "No estamos viajando porque les hemos pedido que no viajen. Les hemos pedido que se pongan las mascarillas". Y creo que ha sido un cambio de comportamiento positivo al modelar eso con sus residentes.

 

Una de las cosas que también quiero mencionar aquí es que creo que, a medida que las personas que llaman escuchan, nuestras comunidades rurales, las que son comunidades de 20,000 o más pequeñas, es un área que creo que estamos muy preocupados por asegurarnos de que la información y la distribución de la vacuna llegue a esas ciudades. Y me atrevería a decir que muchas de las personas que llaman son de esas áreas. Y les insto a que vayan a sus departamentos de salud, llamen a su médico, a que sean su propio defensor porque a veces pensamos en Washington D.C., Chicago y otras ciudades importantes. Pero creo que una de las cosas que quiero destacar es que sabemos que están allí en las ciudades rurales más pequeñas, y AARP, la Liga Nacional de Ciudades y otros, queremos trabajar con ustedes para brindarles esta información. Quiero dejar eso en claro también.

 

Bill Walsh: Muy bien, gracias, Clarence. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Ann de Ohio.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Ann. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Ann: Hola. Mientras escuchaba, respondieron a mi pregunta sobre los hogares de ancianos y qué tan pronto podríamos regresar allí. Entonces, me retiraré y dejaré que alguien más continúe.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Muy bien.

 

Ann: Gracias.

 

Bill Walsh: Muchas gracias. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada, en realidad voy a sacar una de YouTube. Y tenemos una pregunta de Udah, pido disculpas si lo pronuncio incorrectamente. Pero Udah pregunta: "¿Cuánto tiempo dura la vacuna?"

 

Bill Walsh: Dr. Johnson, ¿tiene alguna idea sobre eso? No estoy seguro de que tengamos los datos para decirnos eso.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que tal vez una respuesta de tres palabras, no lo sé, sería suficiente. Estos ensayos de vacunas, estos ensayos de vacunas de Fase 3 se iniciaron en julio de 2020, por lo que apenas llevamos 6 meses. Y las personas que han sido parte de estos ensayos de vacunas, muchos de ellos continúan en los ensayos durante dos años o más. Ese es uno de los temas sobre los que debemos aprender. ¿Cuánto dura la protección? ¿Será necesario un refuerzo? Si es necesario un refuerzo, ¿cuándo es el momento? Creo que aprenderemos más sobre eso. Pero no lo sabemos ahora. Creo que la sabiduría convencional es que habría meses de protección. Pero cómo eso se traduciría en años, tendremos que resolverlo cuando lleguemos allí.

 

Bill Walsh: Bien, muchas gracias. Jean, ¿quién es el siguiente en la línea?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Jill de Nueva Jersey.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Jill. Bienvenida al programa. Y sigue adelante con tu pregunta.

 

Jill: Hola. Bueno, la mayor parte de mi pregunta fue respondida. Pero me preocupa mi tío que tiene 82 años. Tiene una cita para el 5 de abril que hizo a principios de enero. A medida que aumente la oferta, los ancianos que no están en residencias de ancianos o de vida asistida o lo que sea, ¿las otras personas subirán en prioridad? Yo supondría.

 

Bill Walsh: En prioridad. ¿Tu tío no se encuentra en una instalación en este momento?

 

Jill: No. Pero tiene muchos problemas médicos. No lo sé. Solo estoy preocupada por él.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. No, comprendo. Dr. Johnson, me pregunto si puede hablar un poco sobre la priorización. Su tío tiene 82 años. Estoy un poco sorprendido de saber que tendrá que esperar hasta el 5 de abril para conseguir una cita.

 

Steven Johnson: Aludí al hecho de que incluso cuando se usa un límite de edad, todavía hay muchas personas por encima de esa edad y, por supuesto, estamos viendo esto como una vacuna universal. Queremos vacunar a todo el mundo, esencialmente. En nuestra situación aquí en Colorado, llevará varias semanas vacunar a las personas mayores de 70 años. Habiendo dicho esto, abril parece estar más lejos de lo que hubiera predicho. Ciertamente espero que aquí en Colorado, inmunicemos a las personas mayores de 70 antes. Creo que con suerte a finales de febrero. Creo que quizás vale la pena hablar con su médico y averiguar cuál es la historia.

 

En cuanto a la otra parte de la pregunta, ciertamente, si hay éxito en aumentar la producción de las vacunas actuales, si existe la autorización de la vacuna AstraZeneca o Johnson & Johnson para que aumente el suministro y mejoramos la logística de administración las vacunas, presumiría que las personas dentro de una determinada prioridad obtendrían cita para vacunarse antes. Ese sería el enfoque ético.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Y mientras el Dr. Johnson hablaba, Jill, de nuestro personal obtuvo información sobre Nueva Jersey. Y en Nueva Jersey, las personas de 65 años o más son elegibles para la vacuna. Una cosa que puedes hacer es consultar la página de la vacuna contra la COVID-19 en Nueva Jersey o llamar a este número gratuito. Es 855-568-0545. Eso es 855-568-0545. Eso es solo para Nueva Jersey, pero tal vez puedan darte información sobre cómo hacer que tu tío ingrese antes. Ciertamente parece ser elegible. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Tenemos otra pregunta procedente de Facebook. Y creo que esto alude a lo que Clarence habló antes, sobre las comunidades rurales. Efren dice: "Un problema que estoy encontrando es que las personas de edad avanzada tienen que viajar muy largas distancias, para esperar mucho tiempo para recibir una vacuna. ¿Hay algo que se pueda hacer para solucionar esto?"

 

Bill Walsh: Clarence, ¿quieres abordar eso? Este es un gran problema, creo, especialmente en las zonas rurales, pero no solo en las zonas rurales. Entrar en una lista de vacunas es una cosa. Llegar a la vacuna es otra muy distinta para las personas.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, creo que es así. Y muchas de mis respuestas pueden parecer científicas o profesionales, pero tengo la sensación de que tenemos que pensar en esto de manera lógica. Y una de las cosas que estoy viendo es que las farmacias y las tiendas de comestibles que se están utilizando, a menudo tratamos con comunidades rurales que no tienen esas farmacias o no tienen esa farmacia de alta calidad con renombre. Entonces, lo que tenemos que hacer no es crear resultados o crear planes que no se adapten a las personas reales en las zonas rurales o en los vecindarios que son desiertos alimentarios, que no tienen ese tipo de instalaciones, incluso en las comunidades urbanas.

 

Estamos trabajando con nuestros alcaldes para trabajar con los departamentos de salud y abogar a nivel estatal para colocar sitios de vacunas en esas iglesias, tal vez, si podemos empaquetarlas y refrigerarlas, por supuesto, de manera adecuada, centros comunitarios y si tienen una tienda de comestibles. No tiene que ser un Harris Teeter o, en Florida, de donde soy, un Publix. Podría ser otra tienda de comestibles sin nombre.

 

Solo tenemos que pensar en las personas y nuestra estrategia. Y creo que nuestros alcaldes y concejales defienden a sus residentes y están escuchando. Eso es lo que creo que debemos hacer, es crear planes reales que sean efectivos, porque ahora mismo tenemos escasez. Y cuando hay escasez, no creo que realmente pienses en los que están en ese tipo de comunidades rurales. Y debemos hacerlo.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Y me encanta su sugerencia sobre iglesias, centros comunitarios, tiendas de comestibles, como lugares donde se pueden administrar las vacunas. ¿Qué hay de las clínicas móviles? ¿Sabes algo sobre ellas? Esa parece una forma de llegar a la gente de las zonas rurales.

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí, hemos escuchado no solo de las clínicas móviles, sino las bibliotecas móviles, porque, de nuevo, algunas de esas comunidades no las tienen en su área. Hemos estado luchando por eso también. Y espero que podamos conseguirlo. Nuevamente, creo que hay estados, Nueva Jersey, Pensilvania y otros, Florida, que tienen escasez. Y tenemos que encontrar una manera de hacerle llegar a aquellos que tienen más dificultades, porque creo que ahora mismo, eso es lo que nos preocupa.

 

Bill Walsh: Claro. Bien, gracias, Clarence. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestra próxima llamada es Grace de Nueva York.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Grace. Bienvenida al programa. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Grace: Gracias. Mi pregunta es... aparentemente estuve enferma con el virus en abril. Y en ese momento, le decían a la gente que se quedara en casa si tenías fiebre, y eso hice. Tuve fiebre durante aproximadamente una semana. Estaba enferma. Terminé quedándome en casa durante todo el mes. En ese momento, no me hice la prueba de PCR. Después de eso, hice la prueba de PCR en mayo y fue negativa. En junio, me hice una prueba de serología y fue positiva, diciendo que había estada expuesta.

 

Me han hecho la prueba de PCR un par de veces desde entonces debido a los requisitos previos para algunas pruebas médicas. Todas negativo. Y me hicieron la prueba de anticuerpos el sábado 23 de enero, y dice que todavía doy positivo para anticuerpos. Y entonces, creo que ese es el resultado que queremos obtener de la vacuna. ¿Alguien tiene algún conocimiento a través de un médico? Y me pondré en contacto con mis médicos. Pero, ¿alguien sabe si uno es positivo para los anticuerpos, debería colocarse la vacuna?

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede manejar esa pregunta?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esa es una buena pregunta. En primer lugar, creo que los resultados de las pruebas que has mencionado indican que probablemente tuviste COVID-19. Y parece probable que esa enfermedad que tuviste esté relacionada. Por supuesto, no puedes estar segura. Ciertamente, las personas que tienen pruebas de sangre de COVID-19 anterior son candidatos para la vacuna. Y, de hecho, algunas de esas personas fueron incluidas en los ensayos de vacunas. E incluso las personas que tenían análisis de sangre positivos para COVID-19 habían mejorado la protección al recibir la vacuna.

 

Una de las preocupaciones es que la COVID-19, la infección en sí, no necesariamente previene la reinfección. Creemos, a partir de estudios de trabajadores de la salud, etc., que probablemente exista alguna protección después de una infección que dura varios meses más o menos. Pero los CDC han revisado sus pautas y realmente dicen que las personas que han desarrollado COVID-19, siempre que sus síntomas se hayan resuelto y estén fuera del período de cuarentena, deberían ser candidatas para la vacuna. Solo hay un tipo de precaución, y es que si, como parte de su tratamiento, recibe las terapias con anticuerpos, que llamamos anticuerpos monoclonales o plasma convaleciente, se recomienda que espere 90 días porque la preocupación es que esos anticuerpos pueden interferir con la eficacia de la vacuna. Pero según lo que has dicho, me inscribiría en la vacuna y la recibiría tan pronto como esté disponible para ti.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, Dr. Johnson, gracias por esa respuesta. Y Grace, gracias por esa llamada. Jean, déjame recordarles a nuestros oyentes, en realidad. Si deseas hacer una pregunta, presiona * 3 en tu teléfono en cualquier momento para ingresar a la cola. Jean, ¿quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Nuestro próximo interlocutor es Arvin de Nueva Jersey.

 

Bill Walsh: Hola, Arvin. Continúa con tu pregunta.

 

Arvin: Mi pregunta es, ¿las personas que reciben la primera vacuna y no pueden recibir la segunda porque no está disponible, tuvieron que volver a recibir la primera vacuna nuevamente para obtener la segunda?

 

Bill Walsh: Esa es una pregunta interesante. Dr. Johnson, ¿puede abordar eso? Me pregunto si esto se está convirtiendo en algo común en todo el país. Que la gente ha recibido la primera vacuna, pero debido a la escasez o lo que sea, no ha recibido la segunda. Supongo que aquí hay dos preguntas. Una es, ¿en qué momento debería regresar y, supongo, volver a recibir una primera dosis? Y segundo, ¿tienes que recibir la misma vacuna? ¿O puedes conseguir una diferente?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, esta ha sido una historia en desarrollo. Los Centros para el Control de Enfermedades tienen un comité llamado Comité Asesor sobre Prácticas de Inmunización, y ese es realmente el organismo nacional que proporciona recomendaciones sobre vacunas. Y ciertamente, desde el principio, hubo recomendaciones de que no se deben intercambiar las vacunas, y se deben recibir las vacunas en los intervalos exactos que se recomiendan, que son tres semanas de diferencia para la vacuna de Pfizer y cuatro semanas para la vacuna de Moderna.

 

Ha habido un poco de relajación en la última guía de este organismo de vacunación de que la segunda dosis se puede administrar hasta seis semanas después de la primera dosis, y que si la segunda dosis del fabricante no está disponible, se puede administrar la segunda dosis del otro fabricante. Hay un poco más de flexibilidad. Creo que es realmente importante, en términos de nuestra distribución de vacunas a nivel nacional, minimizar este tipo de situaciones. Pero esas son un par de adaptaciones que se enumeran en las recomendaciones de la vacuna, para que las personas puedan recibir esa segunda dosis y obtener esa protección.

 

Bill Walsh: Ahora, si estás fuera de esa ventana de seis semanas, a la pregunta de Arvin, ¿qué debes hacer? ¿Debería verlo como si la dosis inicial ya no fuera válida y volver a la fila para recibir una primera dosis?

 

Steven Johnson: Bueno, esa es una pregunta para la que no sé la respuesta porque no creo que realmente la haya. En el tipo actual de clasificación de vacunas en el que estamos, creo que la probabilidad de recibir tres dosis de vacuna en el futuro previsible parece poco probable. Creo que probablemente vamos a tener algunas situaciones en las que alguien reciba una segunda dosis de vacuna fuera de la ventana que recomendamos. Y creo que los CDC lo reconocen. Por lo tanto, creo que una segunda dosis en cualquier momento probablemente se reconocerá como una segunda dosis.

 

Como una especie de fenómeno relacionado, necesitamos aprender cómo sabemos que las personas están realmente protegidas. ¿Hay análisis de sangre que podamos hacer? Entonces, especialmente para las personas que reciben la vacuna en un tiempo poco ortodoxo, o las personas cuyo sistema inmunitario está debilitado, ¿cómo podemos determinar que han desarrollado una respuesta adecuada a las vacunas? Pero sospecho que esta guía seguirá evolucionando a medida que más y más personas se involucren en este tipo de situaciones.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien, Dr. Johnson. Muchas gracias por eso. Jean, ¿de quién es nuestra próxima llamada?

 

Jean Setzfand: Tenemos otra pregunta procedente de Facebook de Nene. Y ella pregunta: "Hay tantos rumores sobre lo que hay en la vacuna y que causa muertes. ¿Cómo puedo estar segura de que no estoy en peligro de esto?"

 

Bill Walsh: Hm. Dr. Johnson, ¿qué hay de la información errónea sobre el contenido de la vacuna y el daño que podría causar?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, creo que parte de la preocupación es el hecho de que las dos vacunas que están disponibles son una tecnología relativamente nueva, este ARN mensajero, que es un nuevo tipo de vacuna. Pero realmente, estas vacunas se han estado estudiando durante muchos años. Y el perfil de seguridad se ve muy bien en este momento. Y en realidad es inusual en la historia de las vacunas que haya algún efecto secundario de una vacuna que no se descubre hasta años después. Y si piensas en el hecho de que cientos de miles, y ahora millones, de personas han recibido la vacuna, todos los días, estamos obteniendo otro millón de días de exposición, y así sucesivamente

 

Me siento cómodo como proveedor de atención médica. Recibí la vacuna y no dudé. Y, por supuesto, cuando hacemos algo en medicina, siempre miramos los beneficios de hacer algo versus los riesgos de no hacer algo. Y el riesgo de no recibir la vacuna y luego desarrollar COVID-19 es realmente una gran preocupación.

 

Bill Walsh: Lori, me pregunto si podrías opinar sobre esto también. Tal vez desde el punto de vista del cuidador familiar, si estás escuchando información diferente o afirmaciones sobre las vacunas, ¿hay buenas fuentes que podrías indicarle a la gente para conocer los hechos?

 

Lori Smetanka: Hemos estado dirigiendo a las personas a los CDC, sin duda, para obtener la información más actualizada sobre las vacunas. Y han estado actualizando y revisando su guía de forma regular. Y creo que tienen un buen conjunto de recursos no solo para los profesionales sino también para los miembros de la familia, los consumidores y la persona promedio que puede necesitar buena información sobre la vacuna y las preguntas que puedan estar relacionadas con ella. Por lo tanto, hemos estado alentando a las personas a que visiten el sitio web de los CDC en www.cdc.gov.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence, ¿qué pasa a nivel local? Hablaste de esto un poco antes, pero ¿puedes reiterar cuáles son las mejores fuentes de información tanto sobre COVID como sobre las vacunas a nivel local?

 

Clarence Anthony: Sí. Voy a respaldar la recomendación del Dr. Johnson sobre la primera, y es ir a tu médico si tienes acceso a un médico, al departamento de salud de tu condado, y luego al ayuntamiento, alcaldes y líderes a nivel local. Realmente tienen mucha información y utilizan diferentes técnicas para intentar conseguir esa información y conseguir acceso. Y es tan importante que tú, nuevamente, te defiendas a ti mismo aquí porque si estás calificado para recibir la vacuna, deberías poder tener acceso a esa vacuna porque se trata de tu salud y se trata de tu vida y tu calidad de vida. Por eso, queremos ser útiles. Por lo tanto, comunícate con tus líderes locales.

 

Bill Walsh: Muchas gracias, Clarence y a todos nuestros... Adelante, Dr. Johnson.

 

Steven Johnson: Sí, estaba leyendo la guía de los CDC y se menciona que si las personas reciben una segunda dosis más de seis semanas después de la primera, no es necesario reiniciar la serie. El consejo es recibir esa segunda dosis. Y desafortunadamente, si se retrasa más allá de cierto punto, todavía se cuenta como una segunda dosis. No es posible reiniciar la vacuna en este momento.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Gracias por esa aclaración. Y gracias a todos nuestros invitados. Estamos cerca del final. Y quería pedirle a cada uno de nuestros tres expertos cualquier pensamiento o recomendación final que nuestros oyentes deberían llevarse de la discusión de hoy. Dr. Johnson, ¿le gustaría ir primero?

 

Steven Johnson: Sí. Solo diría que confíen en la ciencia, confíen en las vacunas, reciban las vacunas lo antes posible. Pero continúen usando las otras medidas de seguridad que sabemos que ayudan a evitar que se contraiga COVID-19.

 

Bill Walsh: De acuerdo, muchas gracias. Lori Smetanka, ¿tienes alguna idea o recomendación para terminar?

 

Lori Smetanka: Sí, absolutamente. Para ustedes y sus seres queridos en centros de atención a largo plazo, manténgase informados sobre lo que está sucediendo en el centro. Hagan muchas preguntas al administrador sobre lo que está sucediendo. Y si necesitan ayuda, comuníquense con su programa de defensor del pueblo de atención a largo plazo para obtener ayuda.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y Clarence Anthony, te daré la última palabra.

 

Clarence Anthony: Bueno, lo único que diré es gracias a AARP por esta oportunidad de mejorar esta importante conversación sobre los desafíos y las preguntas que los residentes tienen sobre el acceso a la vacuna. Y solo quiero decir, como dijo el Dr. Johnson, crean en la ciencia, defiéndanse y asegúrense de tener acceso a la vacuna porque se trata de la calidad de vida que te gustaría tener. Y los alcaldes y concejales de sus ciudades son socios. Y gracias de nuevo por invitarnos.

 

Bill Walsh: Está bien. Y gracias a cada uno de nuestros invitados por estar hoy en el panel. Ha sido una discusión realmente informativa. Y gracias a nuestros socios, voluntarios y oyentes de AARP por participar hoy. AARP, una organización de membresía sin fines de lucro y no partidista, ha estado trabajando para promover la salud y el bienestar de los adultos mayores en el país durante más de 60 años. Frente a esta crisis, estamos brindando información y recursos para ayudar a los adultos mayores, y a quienes los cuidan, a protegerse del virus, prevenir su propagación a otros, mientras se cuidan.

 

Todos los recursos a los que hicimos referencia hoy, incluida una grabación del evento de preguntas y respuestas de hoy, se podrán encontrar en www.aarp.org/coronavirus a partir de mañana, 29 de enero. Una vez más, esa dirección web es www.aarp.org/coronavirus. Ve allí si tu pregunta no fue respondida y encontrarás las últimas actualizaciones, así como información creada específicamente para adultos mayores y cuidadores familiares.

 

Esperamos que hayas aprendido algo que pueda ayudarte a ti y a tus seres queridos a mantenerse saludables. Sintoniza esta noche a las 7:00 p.m., hora del este, para un evento especial en vivo, Un mundo virtual aguarda, donde exploraremos recursos para ayudarte a aprender, crecer y desarrollar nuevas habilidades para cuidar tu mente, cuerpo y salud durante la pandemia. Gracias y que tengan un buen día.

 

Con esto concluye nuestra llamada.

 

 

7 p.m. ET – A Virtual World Awaits: Finding Fun, Community and Connections

This live Q&A event highlighted the virtual resources available to help older people heal, make friends and build community. The experts also addressed mental wellness and self-care through positive activities – like meditation, yoga and dance – and highlighted the wealth of resources available via the web, social media, apps, podcasts and the AARP Virtual Community Center.

The experts:

  • Dr. Andrea Bonior
    Clinical Psychologist,
    Best-Selling Author, Detox Your Thoughts

  • Jo Ann Allen
    Journalist, Writer and Podcaster,
    Host, Been There Done That 

  • Heather Nawrocki
    Vice President,
    Fun and Fulfillment, AARP

For the latest coronavirus news and advice, go to AARP.org/coronavirus.


Replay previous AARP Coronavirus Tele-Town Halls

  • October 7Coronavirus: Boosters, Flu Vaccines and Wellness Visits
  • September 23 - Coronavirus: Delta Variant, Boosters & Self Care
  • September 9 - Coronavirus: Staying Safe, Caring for Loved Ones & New Work Realities
  • August 26 - Coronavirus: Staying Safe, New Work Realities & Managing Finances
  • August 12 - Coronavirus: Staying Safe in Changing Times
  • June 24 - The State of LGBTQ Equality in the COVID Era
  • June 17 - Coronavirus: Vaccines And Staying Safe During “Reopening”
  • June 3 - Coronavirus: Your Health, Finances & Housing
  • May 20 - Coronavirus: Vaccines, Variants and Coping
  • May 6 - Coronavirus: Vaccines, Variants and Coping
  • April 22 - Your Vaccine Questions Answered and Coronavirus: Vaccines and Asian American and Pacific Islanders
  • April 8 - Coronavirus and Latinos: Safety, Protection and Prevention and Vaccines and Caring for Grandkids and Loved Ones
  • April 1Coronavirus and The Black Community: Your Vaccine Questions Answered
  • March 25Coronavirus: The Stimulus, Taxes and Vaccine
  • March 11 - One Year of the Pandemic and Managing Personal Finances and Taxes
  • February 25Coronavirus Vaccines and You
  • February 11 - Coronavirus Vaccines: Your Questions Answered
  • January 28 - Coronavirus: Vaccine Distribution and Protecting Yourself
    & A Virtual World Awaits: Finding Fun, Community and Connections
  • January 14 - Coronavirus: Vaccines, Staying Safe & Coping and Prevention, Vaccines & the Black Community
  • January 7 - Coronavirus: Vaccines, Stimulus & Staying Safe
  • Dec 3 - Coronavirus: Staying Safe & Coping This Winter
  • Nov 19 - Coronavirus: Vaccines, Staying and A Caregiver's Thanksgiving
  • Nov 12 - Coronavirus: Coping and Maintaining Your Well-Being
  • Oct 1 - Coronavirus: Vaccines & Coping During the Pandemic
  • Sept 17 - Coronavirus: Prevention, Treatments, Vaccines & Avoiding Scams
  • Sept 3 - Coronavirus: Your Finances, Health & Family (6 months in)
  • Aug 20 - Your Health and Staying Protected
  • Aug 6 - Coronavirus: Answering Your Most Frequent Questions
  • July 23 - Coronavirus: Navigating the New Normal
  • July 16 - The Health and Financial Security of Latinos
  • July 9 - Coronavirus: Your Most Frequently Asked Questions
  • June 18 and 20 - Strengthening Relationships Over Time and  LGBTQ Non-Discrimination Protections
  • June 11 – Coronavirus: Personal Resilience in the New Normal