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Traveling With Your Pet 101

Small dog perched on woman's shoulder while on plane.

Richard Atrero de Guzman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

9 things you should know about taking your little one on a plane, train or into a hotel.

Flying

1. Airlines’ policies on pets in the cabin vary, but American Airlines and Delta Air Lines allow dogs or cats (Delta also allows birds) to fly in carriers that can fit under the seat; the fee is $125 each way on domestic flights (international travel, however, gets complicated). Southwest Airlines charges $95. Service animals fly free. 

2. Airports that serve more than 10,000 passengers a year are now required to have pet-relief areas inside terminals — often small patches of fake grass with a cute red fire hydrant, for discreet pit stops.

Close up of a dog on train.

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Riding

3. On most routes, Amtrak allows animals that are 20 pounds or less to ride in a pet carrier for $25 if the trip is less than seven hours.

Two dogs laying on a hotel bed.

Ken Gillespie/Getty Images

Lodging

4. Seventy-five percent of luxury, midscale and economy U.S. hotels now allow pets, according to a recent American Hotel & Lodging Association survey.  

5. Walt Disney World is testing pet inclusivity by welcoming dogs at 4 of its 26 resort hotels. Though fees start at an additional $50 a night, Rover gets a bag of toys and treats. 

6. Some hotel chains, including Red Roof Inn and Kimpton Hotels, welcome pets for free. Other hotels charge a fee but include pet perks. The Cypress Inn in Carmel, Calif., where your dog can stay for an extra $30 per night, hosts “yappy hours” most evenings. Humans sip wine; pooches eat grilled chicken. 

7. Vacation rentals are a good option for traveling with Spot. About 25 percent of homes listed at Home-Away are billed as pet friendly.

Couple eating outdoors at restaurant with two dogs.

Holger Leue/Getty Images

Dining

8. Many restaurants are allowing diners to eat with their dogs in outdoor patio areas, in part thanks to loosening city laws.   

9. Lastly, before setting off, find pet-friendly businesses at your destination, or at points along the way, at bringfido.com or gopetfriendly.com.

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