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Hispanic Attitudes on Aging

Research from AARP shows that, although they feel like society can limit people’s ability to live as they choose, Spanish-dominant and bilingual Hispanic Americans are optimistic about aging. In fact, a majority of Hispanic adults age 35 to 55 surveyed have positive rather than negative feelings about turning 50:

  • 70% feel like life is more meaningful at 50
  • 65% report feeling like reaching age 50 is an important milestone
  • 57% feel that 50 is still young

This result is especially striking when these survey respondents are compared to non-Hispanic adults age 35 to 55, who are significantly less likely to describe life as more meaningful at 50, to see turning 50 as an important milestone, or to describe themselves as feeling happy or optimistic about turning 50.

In particular, Hispanic adults age 35 to 55 are more likely than non-Hispanics (63% vs. 45%) to say that getting older is more about what you have accomplished in life than your age and that turning 50 is a time to celebrate (76% vs. 55%). And although a majority of Gen-X Hispanics are likely to say it is important to enjoy all stages of your life even as you get older (83%), they fear ageism in the workplace, saying that employers prefer younger workers to older ones (66%).

Among Hispanics age 35 to 55, men and women experience aging differently: While men are more likely to say staying fit is harder as they age (61% vs. 45%), they also are more apt to believe getting older is about life accomplishments (70% vs. 56%), and to feel more attractive as they age (54% vs. 41%).

This research was conducted in November 2017 as part of a national omnibus survey among Hispanic adults and non-Hispanic adults age 18 to 64. 

For more information, contact Angela Houghton at ahoughton@aarp.org. Media inquiries should be directed to AARP’s Media Relations Office at media@aarp.org.

Suggested Citation:

Houghton, Angela. Hispanic Attitudes on Aging. Washington, DC: AARP Research, February, 2019. https://doi.org/10.26419/res.00261.001

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