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List of Coronavirus-Related Restrictions in Every State

All states have begun phased reopenings

People walking and riding bikes along a beach

Michael Heiman/Getty Images

En español | Governors across the country are issuing orders and recommendations to their residents on the status of schools, businesses and public services as their states respond to the coronavirus outbreak.

All states have taken coronavirus-related actions, but restrictions vary, and so does the length of time the measures are in place. Here’s a look at each state’s restrictions: 


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• Alabama: At the direction of Gov. Kay Ivey, the state health officer has amended a safer at home order until Oct. 2. People over age 6 must wear masks in indoor public spaces, when using a transportation service or when outdoors in gatherings of 10 or more. Nonwork gatherings are allowed, but individuals from different households must maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Restaurants, bars and breweries can offer limited dine-in services. Hair salons and similar personal-care businesses may also reopen, as long as social distancing and sanitizing measures are taken. Retail stores, athletic facilities and entertainment venues must continue to limit occupancy and implement sanitation and social distancing practices. Beaches are open, but patrons must practice social distancing. Hospital, nursing and long-term care facilities must limit visitors except for circumstances such as end-of-life care or supporting someone with a disability.

• Alaska: Gov. Mike Dunleavy modified a travel mandate that requires those arriving in Alaska to show a negative COVID-19 test, agree to be tested on arrival or opt to self-quarantine for 14 days. Critical infrastructure workers are exempt. Previously, Dunleavy permitted all businesses, including restaurants, hair salons, gyms, museums and entertainment venues to reopen at 100 percent capacity. Safeguards are recommended. In group gatherings, individuals from separate households are encouraged to maintain a 6-foot distance from one another.

• Arizona: Gov. Doug Ducey and the Arizona Department of Health Services released requirements and guidelines for gyms, movie theaters and water parks to reopen. Under the new guidance, the businesses can operate at a limited capacity if certain benchmarks are met. Restaurants can offer indoor dining service but must limit occupancy. Large gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited, but local authorities can approve them if certain safety precautions are met. The Republican governor has restricted residential evictions until Oct. 31.

• Arkansas: Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed an order expanding mail-in voting. Anyone with concerns about voting during the COVID-19 pandemic can qualify to vote by absentee ballot. The state moved to phase 2 of its reopening plan on June 15. Restaurants can expand capacity for dine-in services. Gyms, fitness centers, hair salons and spas can operate if they have safety precautions in place. Visitor centers at state parks and shops can reopen, and residents can rent cabins and lodges. With an approved plan, indoor and outdoor entertainment venues can hold events of up to 66 percent capacity. For gatherings of 100 people or fewer, no approved plan is required. Everyone age 10 or older must wear a mask whether indoors or outdoors if social distancing cannot be maintained.

 As of July 1, family and friends of those in nursing homes and care facilities have been permitted to visit if the facilities have met state health department requirements. Previously, Hutchinson issued an order protecting businesses from liability for damages or injury relating to coronavirus exposure. There is an exception for “willful, malicious or intentional misconduct.”

• California: Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) announced Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a plan that outlines coronavirus restrictions during the pandemic. Each county falls into one of four color-coded tiers: purple (where the virus is most widespread), red, orange and yellow (where the virus is minimally widespread). Most counties are in the purple tier, where restaurants can only offer outdoor dining and retail stores must limit capacity to 25 percent. Hair salons and barbershops can offer indoor services with restrictions. Gyms and fitness centers can only open outdoors. Many other nonessential businesses remain closed, such as nightclubs, theme parks and concert venues.

Once in the red tier, restaurants can resume indoor dining at 25 percent capacity or 100 patrons (whichever is fewer). Retail stores can operate at 50 percent capacity and museums can open indoor at 25 percent capacity. For counties in the orange tier, bars and breweries that don’t serve food are among businesses that can open for outdoor services. For counties in the yellow tier, most businesses can reopen, but still must follow safety precautions.

For a full list of restrictions, visit covid19.ca.gov. Newsom has ordered everyone to wear a face mask in public spaces; children under age 2 and people with certain medical disabilities are among those who are exempt.

• Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis (D) extended a mask mandate until Oct. 12. Everyone age 11 or older must wear a face covering in indoor public spaces or while using public transportation or ride-hailing services. Workplaces can deny service or admission to customers who aren’t wearing a face mask. Previously, the governor announced that a limited number of fans may attend the Denver Broncos game on Sept. 27.

The state is under a safer-at-home order. Residents 65 and older and other vulnerable individuals are urged, but not required, to stay at home. Indoor gatherings are allowed but must be limited to 100 people, among other restrictions. Outdoor events must have no more than 175 people. Restaurants can resume dine-in services at 50 percent capacity or 50 people (whichever is fewer), and bars at 25 percent capacity or 50 people (whichever is fewer). Polis has ordered restaurants and bars to stop serving alcohol at 11 p.m. Retail stores can allow customers inside, with limits in place. Hair salons and other personal-care businesses can resume services, also with limits on the number of clients. Outdoor visits at long-term care facilities are allowed with strict limitations.

• Connecticut: Gov. Ned Lamont announced he will sign an order imposing a $100 fine on anyone who violates the mask mandate. Anyone over age 2 must wear a face covering in public places, indoors or outdoors, when social distancing cannot be maintained. People who qualify for a medical exemption must have written documentation. Lamont further announced the order will impose fines on those who violate gathering rules. Indoor gatherings for social and recreational purposes are capped at 25 people, and outdoors at 100. Outdoor organized events, such as concerts, are capped at 500 people, and participants must maintain a 15-foot distance from one another (for example, blanket to blanket).

Previously, Lamont signed an order requiring travelers arriving in the state to announce their plans and disclose where they are staying, among other details. Travelers arriving from states with high COVID-19 infection rates must self-quarantine for 14 days. There is a $1,000 fine for failure to comply. Phase 2 of the state’s reopening plan began June 17. Restaurants are permitted to resume dine-in services at 50 percent capacity, and gyms are allowed to reopen, with restrictions. Hair salons, barbershops and casinos can reopen, with precautions in place.

• Delaware: Gov. John Carney signed an order combining coronavirus-related restrictions. Individuals must wear a face covering when in public places, including grocery stores and on mass transit. Face coverings aren’t required if outdoors when social distancing can be maintained. Retail stores, restaurants, hair salons and most other businesses can continue operating at 60 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Exercise facilities and senior and adult day-care centers must remain at 30 percent capacity. Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted if safety precautions are in place. Gatherings of more than 250 people must be approved.

• District of Columbia: Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered individuals who were traveling for nonessential reasons to self-quarantine upon arrival in the district if they are returning from a high-risk area. Travelers from Maryland and Virginia are exempt. Previously, she ordered people older than 2 to wear a mask when leaving their residences if more than fleeting contact with others is likely. Washington, D.C., is in phase 2 of the region’s reopening plan. People must continue to practice social distancing, and gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited. Restaurants can resume indoor dining with restrictions, such as spacing tables 6 feet apart and limiting the size of a party to six people. Retail establishments can reopen for indoor shopping but must limit occupancy to 50 percent. Bars and nightclubs are among nonessential businesses that must remain closed. High-contact sports are prohibited. Hair salons and barbershops may reopen, but customers must make appointments, and other safeguards must be in place.

• Florida: Halsey Beshears, secretary of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, announced bars can reopen at 50 percent capacity Sept. 14. (Previously, he ordered bars that derive more than 50 percent of their sales from alcohol to stop selling alcohol for on-premises consumption.) Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced that Miami-Dade County and Broward County can enter phase 2 on Sept. 14 along with the rest of the state. Under phase 2, restaurants can offer outdoor seating if tables are spaced 6 feet apart, and indoor service at 50 percent capacity. Movie theaters and other entertainment venues can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Gyms and fitness centers can operate at full capacity with safety protocols in place. Gatherings of more than 50 people are discouraged. Previously, DeSantis extended until Oct. 1 a moratorium on evictions for tenants adversely affected by COVID-19.

Several cities in Florida have a mask mandate. Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giménez announced that restaurants in Miami-Dade can reopen for indoor dining services with limited seating, but bars in Miami-Dade County remain closed.

• Georgia: Gov. Brian Kemp (R) signed an order extending restrictions related to COVID-19 through the end of September. People living in long-term care facilities and other at-risk individuals, such as those with severe lung or heart disease, must shelter in place. The order sets up a plan for guests to visit loved ones at long-term care facilities. For facilities with high infection rates, visits are permitted only in limited cases, such as end-of-life circumstances. Other facilities may allow outdoor-only or outdoor and indoor visits, depending on whether they meet certain criteria.

Kemp has strongly encouraged everyone to wear face masks while outside their homes but stopped short of requiring it. Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed, but individuals must maintain a 6-foot distance from each other. Restaurants must adhere to strict sanitation and social distancing guidelines. Gyms, hair salons and movie theaters are among businesses that can operate, with restrictions.

• Hawaii: Gov. David Ige announced he will reinstate a partial quarantine between islands. Interisland travelers who arrive in Kauai, Hawaii, Maui or Kalawao must self-quarantine for 14 days. Previously, he announced that, as of Sept. 1, travelers arriving in Hawaii from out of state must show a negative COVID-19 test result or self-quarantine for 14 days. Until then, a travel mandate remains in effect that requires all people entering Hawaii from out of state to self-quarantine for 14 days except for those who perform emergency response or critical infrastructure functions.

The state is under the Act With Care phase of its reopening, which allows many businesses to resume operations, with restrictions. Gatherings of up to 10 people are allowed, but individuals should practice social distancing. Earlier, Ige issued an order requiring people to wear a face mask while inside an essential business or while waiting in line to enter one.

Kauai Mayor Derek Kawakami and Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell ordered people to also wear masks outdoors when social distancing cannot be maintained. Caldwell recently re-closed city parks and facilities, including beaches, tennis courts and swimming pools, amid a resurgence of COVID-19 cases.

• Idaho: Gov. Brad Little announced that he is extending Stage 4 of Idaho’s reopening plan and that the state will move to a regional response going forward. Under Stage 4, gatherings of any size are permitted, but people should practice social distancing and follow hygiene recommendations. While businesses may resume operations, they should adhere to social distancing and sanitation recommendations.

• Illinois: Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced new guidance for youth and adult recreational sports. The level of play permitted depends on whether the sport carries a high, medium or low risk of exposure to COVID-19. The state is in phase 4 of a 5-phase plan to reopen the economy. As of June 26, gatherings of up to 50 people or 50 percent of a room’s capacity are permitted. Bowling alleys, theaters, performing arts centers and similar indoor venues can resume operations, with limits. Restaurants can reopen for indoor dining at 25 percent capacity but must space tables 6 feet apart, among other restrictions. Hair salons, gyms and other nonessential businesses can reopen if they have safety measures and other restrictions in place. Anyone over age 2 must wear a face mask when indoors at a public space or when outdoors at a public place where a 6-foot distance between people cannot be maintained.

 Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced that she is reinstating restrictions on some businesses. Among other rules, restaurants must limit a party’s size to six people, fitness classes must be capped at 10 people, and bars, breweries and similar alcohol establishments that don’t serve food cannot offer indoor service. The restrictions took effect July 24.

• Indiana: Gov. Eric Holcomb (R) signed an order extending stage 4.5 of the state’s reopening plan until Sept. 25. Under that stage, bars, nightclubs, movie theaters and other entertainment venues can reopen at 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Restaurants can operate at 75 percent capacity, retail stores at full capacity. Hair salons, gyms, hotels, government offices and other professional businesses may reopen. Reopened businesses are required to implement a safety plan that addresses sanitation and social distancing. Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted, indoors and outdoors, provided that social distancing is practiced. Adult day care facilities can allow outdoor visits. Individuals 65 or older and other vulnerable populations are encouraged to remain cautious when at work or out in the community. Holcomb also extended a mask mandate until Sept. 25. People must wear a face covering when in an indoor public space, when outdoors if social distancing cannot be maintained and when using public transportation.

• Iowa: Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed a proclamation closing bars, nightclubs, breweries and similar alcohol establishments in six counties until Sept. 20. The shuttered businesses can still offer carryout or delivery. Restaurants in those counties may remain open but must stop serving alcohol after 10 p.m. Previously, Reynolds permitted nonessential businesses, such as amusement parks, movie theaters, museums, hair salons, barbershops, gyms, retail stores and massage parlors, to resume operations if safety precautions are taken. Reynolds also allowed restaurants to reopen with a customer limit and a requirement to space parties 6 feet apart. Farmers markets can also operate, but only food vendors are permitted to sell, and social distancing measures must be in place. The governor has permitted social gatherings of more than 10 people if social distancing measures are implemented.

• Kansas: Gov. Laura Kelly signed an order prohibiting evictions and foreclosures due to pandemic-related financial hardship. The order lasts until Sept. 15. In July, Kelly ordered anyone over age 5 to wear a mask in indoor public spaces, when using public transportation or when outside if a 6-foot distance from others cannot be maintained. Previously, she announced that counties should come up with their own plans to reopen businesses. A statewide plan to restart the economy in phases offers guidance, but counties aren’t required to follow it. The state Department of Health and Environment mandated a 14-day home quarantine for all Kansans who traveled to a state with widespread transmission. The mandate also applies to anyone who traveled internationally or on a cruise ship on or after March 15.

• Kentucky: Gov. Andy Beshear signed an order requiring landlords to give tenants 30 days’ notice before eviction for failure to pay rent. The order also requires the landlord and tenant to meet during that time in order to try to work out an agreement, and it bans late fees on rent through Dec. 31. Previously, Beshear extended a mask mandate that requires anyone over age 5 to wear a face covering while inside a public space, while using public transportation or while outdoors if social distancing cannot be maintained. After closing bars for two weeks to stop the spread of COVID-19, Beshear issued an order allowing bars and restaurants to resume operating at 50 percent capacity, as long as parties can maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Food and beverage service must stop at 10 p.m. Private gatherings, which had been capped at 50 people, are now capped at 10. Fitness centers, bowling alleys, retail stores and movie theaters can operate, with restrictions.

• Louisiana: Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) signed an order moving the state to phase 3 of its reopening plan. Under the new restrictions, gyms, theaters, hair salons, museums and restaurants are among the businesses that can operate at 75 percent capacity. Bars must remain closed for on-premises food and drink consumption in parishes with a high rate of COVID-19. For parishes with a low positivity rate, bars can reopen at a limited capacity, and alcohol service must stop at 10 p.m. Amusement parks, concert halls and children’s indoor play centers are among businesses that must remain closed. Indoor social gatherings are capped at 250 people or 50 percent capacity of the facility. Outdoor social gatherings of more than 250 people are permitted only if individuals from separate households can maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. People 8 and older must wear a mask in public spaces, indoors or outdoors, unless social distancing can be maintained.

• Maine: Gov. Janet Mills signed an order permitting outdoor gatherings of five people per 1,000 square feet or 100 people (whichever is smaller). The limit for indoor gatherings remains at 50 people. Face coverings are mandatory for anyone 5 and older in public spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained. Previously, Mills modified a travel mandate that requires those visiting Maine who plan to stay in a lodging establishment to show a negative COVID-19 test or opt to self-quarantine for 14 days. Travelers from five states, including Vermont and New Hampshire, are exempt. Under a safer-at-home order, people over 60 are encouraged to limit interactions with those outside their household but aren’t required to stay at home. Campgrounds have been permitted to reopen, but they must take safety precautions. Most businesses can reopen, with restrictions. Bars and tasting rooms can offer outdoor dining, but the reopening of indoor dining has been postponed.

• Maryland: Gov. Larry Hogan (R) signed an order moving the state to stage 3 of its reopening plan at 5 p.m. Sept. 4. Indoor theaters may reopen at 50 percent capacity or 100 people per auditorium (whichever is smaller). Retail and religious facilities can operate at 75 percent capacity. Fitness centers and personal service businesses, such as beauty salons and barbershops, can operate at 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Restaurants can continue to offer in-dining services at 50 percent capacity, and cannot offer food buffet style, among other restrictions. Senior citizen activity centers remain closed. Previously, Hogan issued a mask mandate requiring people over age 5 to wear a face covering in the public spaces of all businesses or areas outdoors when social distancing cannot be maintained.

• Massachusetts: Gov. Charlie Baker signed an order tightening the restrictions on the reopening plan. The state is in step 1 of phase 3 of its reopening plan. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 50 people (down from 100). The limit on indoor gatherings remains at 25 people. The rules on face coverings have been updated to require everyone over age 2 to wear a mask in public places, including grocery stores and taxis, or when more than 10 people from different households are gathered. Previously, Baker permitted movie theaters, museums and fitness centers to reopen, with restrictions. Restaurants can continue indoor service but must space tables 6 feet apart, among other restrictions. Retail stores and close-contact businesses, such as nail and hair salons, can remain open but must follow precautions. Baker ordered travelers entering the state to self-quarantine for 14 days or show a negative COVID-19 test result. Travelers from states with low rates of COVID-19 are among those who are exempt.

• Michigan: Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed an order permitting gyms and fitness centers to reopen at 25 percent capacity as of Sept 9. Precautions must be followed. Whitmer also allowed contact sports to resume. Movie theaters in most regions remain closed. People age 5 and older must wear a face covering when inside an enclosed business or public space and when outside in crowded spaces. People who cannot medically tolerate masks, who are eating or drinking, or who are exercising are among those exempt. Businesses open to the public must refuse service to people not wearing a mask.

Previously, in response to a surge in COVID-19 cases, Whitmer ordered bars in all regions to stop indoor service. The mandate applies to food establishments that earn more than 70 percent of their gross receipts from alcohol sales. Outside service is still permitted. Whitmer’s order also amended rules for social gatherings. Indoor gatherings are capped at 10 and outdoor gatherings are capped at 100 (for two regions, the cap on outdoor gatherings is 250).

• Minnesota: Gov. Tim Walz ordered people age 5 and up to wear a mask when inside public settings or outside where social distancing cannot be practiced. The order takes effect July 25. Under the state’s Safely Reopen plan, gyms, theaters, concert halls and museums can open up but must limit the number of visitors. Restaurants can resume indoor dining provided that they adhere to restrictions, including requiring reservations. Indoor gatherings will still be capped at 10 people, but outdoor gatherings of up to 25 participants will be permitted. Previously, he allowed personal-care businesses like hair and nail salons to reopen, with safety and sanitation practices in place. Walz also issued an order permitting weddings, funerals and worship services to resume, but people not in the same household must maintain a 6-foot distance, among other restrictions. Retail stores can allow a limited number of customers inside.

• Mississippi: Gov. Tate Reeves (R) announced he will modify an order limiting spectators at K-12 extracurricular events to 25 percent capacity, as long as social distancing can be maintained. Reeves also announced he will extend a mask mandate. Everyone over age 6 should wear a face covering in indoor public places or when outdoors if social distancing isn’t possible. The group-gathering restrictions in his Safe Return order hold that across the state, indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people, and outdoor gatherings to 20. Some gatherings are exempt, such as those at religious organizations or students meeting in classrooms. All businesses may reopen as long as restrictions are in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Bars can serve alcohol only to seated patrons and cannot serve alcohol after 11 p.m. Elderly and vulnerable individuals are encouraged, but not required, to stay at home. Visitors to nursing homes and long-term care facilities should spend time with family members only and avoid contact with other residents, among other restrictions.

• Missouri: Gov. Mike Parson announced that the state will fully reopen June 16. A press release issued by the governor’s office said, “All statewide restrictions will be lifted, though local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations, or ordinances in place.” Parson encouraged people to continue to practice social distancing and take precautions, such as practicing good hygiene and avoiding large crowds.

• Montana: Gov. Steve Bullock directed individuals in counties experiencing four or more active cases of COVID-19 to wear a mask in indoor public spaces, or when outdoors if 50 or more people are gathered and social distancing cannot be maintained. Children under age 5 are among those who are exempt. Previously, Bullock directed the state’s economy to reopen in phases. Phase two began June 1. All businesses can operate and should implement social distancing. Gyms, fitness centers, pools, movie theaters and restaurants can increase capacity to 75 percent. People are encouraged to maintain a 6-foot distance from others when in public and avoid gathering in groups of more than 50. People over 65 and other vulnerable populations are encouraged to stay at home. Senior centers and assisted living facilities cannot allow visitors.

• Nebraska: For counties in phase 4 of Gov. Pete Ricketts’ reopening plan, indoor gatherings are permitted at 75 percent rated occupancy. Outdoor gatherings are permitted at 100 percent rated occupancy. Groups must maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Businesses are encouraged to follow recommend guidance. For counties in phase 3, restaurants and bars can operate at full capacity, but parties must be limited to eight people. Gyms, hair salons and similar businesses can operate at 75 percent capacity. Indoor gatherings of up to 50 percent occupancy are permitted but cannot exceed 10,000 people. Outdoor gatherings of up to 75 percent occupancy are allowed, up to 10,000 people.

How Social Distancing Helps Everyone

• Nevada: Gov. Steve Sisolak adopted a road to recovery plan. A COVID-19 response task force will review criteria for each county and come up with targeted measures to address counties with an increased risk of transmission. For now, restrictions remain in place. Gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited, and employees are encouraged to work remotely if possible. Restaurants are permitted to resume dine-in services, as long as they adhere to sanitation and social distancing guidelines. Bars and breweries are closed in some counties. Retail stores can allow customers on site in a limited capacity. Most other businesses can also reopen, with restrictions, including movie theaters, bowling alleys, gyms and hair salons. People over age 2 must wear a face covering whenever they leave home, including at outdoor public spaces when social distancing of at least 6 feet cannot be maintained.

• New Hampshire: Gov. Chris Sununu ordered individuals to wear face coverings at scheduled activities where 100 people or more are gathered, such as religious services, concerts or sporting events. Previously, Sununu permitted the state’s stay-at-home order to expire June 15. Restaurants can resume both indoor and outdoor dining services, but tables should be spaced 6 feet apart, among other guidelines. Gyms can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Previously, Sununu permitted retail stores, hair salons, barbershops and similar businesses to reopen, with restrictions. He reopened all seacoast beaches and lifted the restrictions on certain activities, such as sunbathing and picnicking. Hotels could reopen June 5, but out-of-state travelers must meet self-quarantine restrictions.

• New Jersey: Gov. Phil Murphy (D) announced restaurants will be able to resume indoor dining as of 5 p.m. Sept. 4. A 25 percent capacity limit will be mandated, and tables must be spaced 6 feet apart, among other restrictions. Movie theaters can also reopen Sept. 4 at 25 percent room capacity or 150 people (whichever is smaller). Indoor gatherings are capped at 25 percent of the room’s capacity with a maximum of 25 people. Outdoor gatherings of up to 500 people are allowed, though attendees must maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Previously, Murphy signed an order allowing practices and competitions for high-contact sports, such as football, group dance and wrestling. The activities must take place outdoors, among other restrictions. He ordered people to wear face coverings when outside in public spaces if social distancing cannot be maintained. Wearing cloth masks in grocery stores and other indoor retail businesses remains a requirement.

• New Mexico: Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced that the state will update its public health order to ease restrictions. Youth sports practices will be allowed, with a group limit of 10. As of Oct. 1, overnight camping at state parks will be permitted for groups of up to 10. Pick-your-own pumpkin patches may operate, provided that safety precautions are in place. Previously, the order permitted restaurants to resume indoor dining at 25 percent capacity. Outdoor dining is allowed if safety practices are followed. Houses of worship may operate at 40 percent capacity. Most retail stores may reopen at limited capacity. Gyms, hair salons and other close-contact businesses may also operate at limited capacity. Individuals are required to wear face masks in public, including while exercising at fitness centers. People traveling to New Mexico from states with a high COVID-19 infection rate must self-isolate for 14 days.

• New York: Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced indoor dining can resume at 25 percent capacity in New York City on Sept. 30 (New York City restaurants can currently offer outdoor dining, pickup and delivery). Restaurants in all other regions can resume dine-in service at 50 percent capacity. The state is in phase 4 of its reopening plan. Among other restrictions, zoos, nature parks, outdoor museums and other low-risk outdoor arts and entertainment venues can reopen at 33 percent capacity; indoor arts and entertainment venues can open at 25 percent capacity; and gyms and fitness centers can operate at 33 percent capacity. Movie theaters remain closed. Social gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed. Individuals over age 2 must wear a face mask in public if social distancing cannot be maintained. The governor also issued an order permitting businesses to deny entry to anyone who is not wearing a mask. 

Previously, Cuomo announced that travelers arriving in New York from states with high rates of COVID-19 must self-quarantine for 14 days. He also extended a pause on evictions for those who cannot pay rent due to a COVID-19 hardship.

• North Carolina: Gov. Roy Cooper (D) signed an order moving the state into phase 2.5 of a safer-at-home plan, effective at 5 p.m. Sept. 4. Gyms and fitness centers are now permitted to open but must limit capacity to 30 percent. Equipment must be spaced 6 feet apart, and customers must wear face masks inside the facility except when exercising strenuously. Restaurants, retail stores and personal care businesses, such as hair salons, can continue to operate with capacity limits, among other restrictions. Restaurants continue to be prohibited from serving alcohol after 11 p.m. The new order also expands the limits on gatherings. Gatherings of 50 or fewer people outdoors and 25 or fewer indoors are allowed if social distancing can be maintained. Entertainment facilities, such as bars and movie theaters, remain closed.

Previously, Cooper ordered people 5 and older to wear face coverings in public places where social distancing cannot be maintained. Visits to nursing homes and assisted living facilities are restricted except in compassionate care situations, such as end-of-life circumstances, or outdoor visits.

• North Dakota: Gov. Doug Burgum signed an order encouraging people to follow the state’s Smart Restart plan. It recommends that restaurants, cafés and similar food establishments operate at 75 percent capacity. Hair salons and other personal-care businesses should operate with sanitation measures in place. Gyms and fitness centers that hold classes should follow social distancing practices.

• Ohio: Under the direction of Gov. Mike DeWine, the Department of Health’s interim director issued an order permitting all sports competitions to resume this fall. But strict restrictions, such as limiting the number of spectators, remain in place. Previously, DeWine signed an order adopting a rule that bans restaurants and bars from selling alcohol after 10 p.m. DeWine said the order was an attempt to curb the behavior of people gathering indoors in close contact. People statewide are required to wear face coverings when inside a location that is not a residence, when using public transportation or when outside if a 6-foot distance between non-household members cannot be maintained. Children under age 10 and individuals with certain medical conditions are among those exempt. DeWine also advised travelers arriving in Ohio from states with a high rate of COVID-19 to self-quarantine for 14 days, but he stopped short of requiring it.

Under the current health advisory to reopen the state’s economy, gyms and other fitness venues can resume operations if they follow safety standards. Restaurants can offer table service indoors, with restrictions. Retail stores may reopen, but certain sanitation and social distancing practices must be implemented. Hair salons and other close-care businesses can reopen, provided they abide by strict sanitation rules. Nonessential medical procedures may resume, and nonessential offices, construction and manufacturing businesses may restart operations. Everyone using shared outdoor space must keep a distance of at least 6 feet except for family members. Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited.

• Oklahoma: Gov. Kevin Stitt signed an order allowing long-term care facilities to accept visitors under the state’s phased reopening plan. Phase 3, which began June 1, allows summer camps to open. Workplaces no longer have to restrict the number of staff members. Hair salons and other personal-care businesses can take walk-in clients. Businesses should implement sanitation and social distancing practices. Some cities require people to wear a face covering when in public.

• Oregon: Gov. Kate Brown lifted a stay-at-home order for Umatilla County after a decline in COVID-19 cases. The county can move to phase 1 of the state’s reopening plan. For counties in phase 1, restaurants and bars can resume indoor dining, but they must place tables 6 feet apart and take other precautions. Salons, spas and gyms are among businesses allowed to reopen with restrictions. Swimming pools, bowling alleys and movies theaters must remain closed. For counties in phase 2, additional businesses, such as movie theaters, pools and bowling alleys, can reopen with restrictions.

For all counties, social gatherings are capped at 10 people and cultural or faith-based gatherings at 25. Brown ordered people age 5 and older to wear face coverings in outdoor spaces where a 6-foot distance cannot be maintained and in indoor public spaces.

• Pennsylvania: Gov. Tom Wolf announced new restrictions on the state’s phased reopening plan. All counties are in the green phase, but restaurants must now limit indoor dining to 25 percent capacity. Indoor gatherings are capped at 25 people, and outdoor gatherings, at 250 people. Gyms, hair salons, nail salons, tattoo parlors and other close-contact businesses can reopen with restrictions. Previously, under Wolf’s direction, the Department of Health ordered individuals age 2 and older to wear a face covering in public places indoors and outdoors if a 6-foot distance from non-household members cannot be maintained. The governor announced that the tollbooths along the Pennsylvania Turnpike will stop taking cash.

• Rhode Island: Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) extended Phase 3 guidance for the state through Sept. 28. Restaurants can provide indoor dining services up to 66 percent capacity. Retail stores can resume operations with capacity limits. Close-contact businesses, such as gyms and hair salons, can also reopen with restrictions. Private indoor social gatherings are limited to 15 people or 50 people with a licensed caterer. Private outdoor social gatherings are capped at 15 people, or 100 people with a licensed caterer.

Previously, Raimondo ordered individuals over age 2 to wear a face covering in public spaces, whether indoors or outdoors. Face masks are also required when using taxis, ride-booking vehicles or similar transportation services. Anyone arriving in Rhode Island from an area with a high community COVID-19 spread rate must self-quarantine for 14 days or provide a negative test.

• South Carolina: Gov. Henry McMaster issued an order that makes certain recommendations for restaurants and other businesses requirements. Restaurants must require patrons to wear a face covering when inside the establishment except when they are eating or drinking. Dine-in service at restaurants is limited to 50 percent capacity, tables must be spaced at least 6 feet apart, and guests cannot congregate in a bar area, among other restrictions. Entertainment venues, such as theaters and concert halls, and other types of mass gatherings cannot exceed 50 percent occupancy or 250 people (whichever is smaller). Masks are required. Other nonessential businesses can reopen, and guidelines are recommended. Beaches are open, but McMaster has authorized local authorities to close or restrict public access points if it’s deemed necessary to protect visitors’ health.

• South Dakota: Gov. Kristi Noem signed an order putting the state’s “Back to Normal” plan in effect. The plan encourages employers to sanitize high-traffic areas and screen employees for illness. Retail businesses should operate in a manner that promotes social distancing and should consider limiting the number of customers inside their stores. The plan also encourages, but doesn’t require, older adults and other vulnerable individuals to stay at home.

• Tennessee: Gov. Bill Lee signed an order permitting contact sports to resume if safety measures are in place. Previously, under the direction of Lee, the state’s economic recovery group issued updated guidelines for businesses as they reopen. It recommends that restaurants space tables 6 feet apart and limit parties to 10 people, among other restrictions. Retail stores should limit customers, and gyms, hair salons, spas and similar close-contact businesses should implement strict social distancing and sanitation practices. Amusement parks, movie theaters and other large venues can also reopen but should separate people from different households or small groups by 6 feet and encourage customers to wear face masks, among other precautions. Previously, Lee issued an order permitting groups of up to 50 to gather. People not within the same household should practice social distancing.

The Metro Board of Health for Nashville and Davidson County ordered individuals in the region to wear masks in public. Gov. Lee has also given mayors in counties without a locally run health department permission to issue a face mask requirement.

• Texas: Gov. Greg Abbott (R) issued an order that loosens restrictions for many business services. In counties that meet certain criteria, most businesses, such as restaurants, gyms, office buildings and museums, can expand operations to 75 percent capacity. Bars must remain closed. Anyone 10 or older must wear a mask in indoor public spaces or when outside if a 6-foot distance from others cannot be maintained. Counties with no more than 20 active COVID-19 cases are exempt. Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited in most circumstances unless local government officials approve them. The occupancy limits don’t apply to worship services, government operations or youth camps.

• Utah: Gov. Gary Herbert signed an order updating the guidance for the reopening plan. The state uses a color-coded system. Most counties are in the yellow low-risk phase, under which all businesses can reopen if they take precautions. Restaurants must space tables 6 feet apart. Buffets may open, but staff must hand plates to patrons directly, among other restrictions. When playing sports, participants should be checked for symptoms. A few counties require people to wear a face mask in public places; other counties encourage, but don’t require, this practice. Herbert has mandated face masks for individuals inside state facilities. Private gatherings are capped at 50 people or fewer. Cultural arts and other events can exceed 50 people if certain guidelines are followed. For counties in the green new-normal phase, restrictions on private gatherings are lifted, but people are encouraged to take personal responsibility to stop the spread of COVID-19.

• Vermont: Gov. Phil Scott ordered people age 2 and older to wear a face covering in public spaces, indoors or outdoors, when physical distancing isn’t possible. Previously, he permitted restaurants and entertainment venues to expand capacity to 50 percent of maximum occupancy. Indoor events of up to 75 people and outdoor organized events of up to 150 are allowed. Long-term care facilities may allow residents to receive two visitors per day, but the visits must be outside, among other rules. Hair salons and barbershops can reopen, but they must take appointments and limit occupancy. Hotels, inns, bed-and-breakfasts and other lodging areas were allowed to resume operations May 22, but out-of-state travelers must follow a self-quarantine mandate.

• Virginia: Gov. Ralph Northam ordered additional restrictions on the Hampton Roads area. Restaurants, breweries and similar establishments cannot sell alcohol after 10 p.m. and must limit service to 50 percent capacity, among other measures. Private or public gatherings are capped at 50 people in that area. Virginia is in phase three of its reopening plan. Outside the Hampton Roads area, restaurants can offer indoor service at full capacity if parties are separated by 6 feet, among other restrictions. Bar seats and congregating areas must remain closed except for foot traffic. Indoor and outdoor swimming pools, gyms and fitness centers can operate at 75 percent capacity. Social gatherings of up to 250 people are allowed. Movie theaters, concert venues and other entertainment areas can reopen but must follow strict guidelines. Northam ordered everyone 10 and older to wear a face covering in indoor public spaces.

• Washington: Gov. Jay Inslee announced modified guidelines for the state’s phased reopening plan. In counties still in phase 1, individuals 65 and older and other high-risk populations remain under a stay-at-home order unless participating in a phase 1 activity. Permissible outdoor activities include golfing, hunting and fishing, as long as social distancing practices are followed. Outdoor social gatherings are limited to 5 or fewer people. Outdoor spiritual gatherings of up to 100 people are allowed. Restaurants can reopen indoor dining at 25 percent capacity and outdoor dining at 50 percent capacity. In-store retail businesses can operate at 30 percent capacity.

For counties in phase 2, outdoor social gatherings are limited to five people. Outdoor spiritual gatherings of up to 200 people are allowed. Gyms and fitness centers can have one customer for every 300 square feet. Restaurants can offer in-dining services at 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Hair and nail salons and housecleaning services can operate with restrictions; retail stores may allow customers inside in a limited capacity.

For counties in phase 3, outdoor social gatherings are capped at 10 people. Indoor spiritual gatherings are capped at 400 people or 50 percent capacity (whichever is smaller). Restaurants must limit capacity to 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Indoor movie theaters can operate at 25 percent capacity.

In all phases, masks are required in indoor public spaces or outdoors when social distancing can’t be maintained. Live entertainment, indoors or outdoors, is also prohibited in all counties.

• West Virginia: Gov. Jim Justice extended an order closing bars in Monongalia County through Aug. 31. In response to an outbreak of COVID-19 cases, Justice signed an order prohibiting the general public from visiting nursing homes. There are limited exceptions, including residents in end-of-life care. Previously, Justice ordered people age 9 and older to wear a face covering when in a confined indoor public space where social distancing cannot be maintained. He also issued guidance for businesses as they reopen. Restaurants can open for indoor service, with restrictions. Social gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted. Hair salons, gyms, museums and other businesses should follow safety and sanitation protocols. Private campgrounds and state park campgrounds were allowed to reopen as of June 10.

• Wisconsin: Gov. Tony Evers issued a mask mandate, effective Aug. 1. Individuals ages 5 and older must wear a face covering when indoors or in an enclosed space (other than their private residence) when other people are present. When individuals are outdoors, masks are encouraged but not required. Previously, the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the state Department of Health Services’ safer-at-home order, issued under the direction of Evers. Evers issued a statement in response to the ruling, asking Wisconsinites to continue to do their part to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Private businesses can enforce their own restrictions, such as requiring patrons to follow social distancing practices.

• Wyoming: Under the direction of Gov. Mark Gordon, the state health officer extended an order on coronavirus-related restrictions through Sept. 15. Indoor gatherings of 50 people in a single, confined space are allowed. If social distancing and other restrictions are in place, indoor events with up to 250 people are permitted. Gatherings at hotels, livestock auctions, grocery stores and faith-based organizations are among those that are exempt. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 50 percent of a venue’s capacity or 1,000 people (whichever is smaller). Previously, under Gordon’s direction, the state public health officer allowed restaurants to resume indoor service if precautions are taken, such as adequately spacing tables and requiring staff to wear face masks. Hair salons and gyms have also reopened, with tight restrictions.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect new information.

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