Javascript is not enabled.

Javascript must be enabled to use this site. Please enable Javascript in your browser and try again.

Skip to content
Content starts here
CLOSE ×

Search

Leaving AARP.org Website

You are now leaving AARP.org and going to a website that is not operated by AARP. A different privacy policy and terms of service will apply.

5 Things to Rent, Not Buy

Live it up and keep costs down by leasing these unique items 

spinner image graphic with images of prices and things you can rent

A home on wheels

spinner image illustration with RV
iStock

A new 19-foot RV will set you back $70,000 or more. Instead, rent 1 of 4 standard models from Cruise America or choose from hundreds of RV-rental listings by individual owners (available by the day, week or month) on sites such as RVshare and Outdoorsy.

Outdoors outfitting

spinner image illustration with camping gear
iStock

Camping gear for a family can run well over $1,000. Plan B: Have a set shipped to your destination by Outdoors Geek or Gear to Go OutfittersMountain Side Gear Rental offers kits that include not only a tent and sleeping bags but extras like a cookstove and biodegradable camp soap (cost: $157 for three nights).

spinner image Image Alt Attribute

AARP Membership

Join AARP for $12 for your first year when you sign up for Automatic Renewal. Get instant access to members-only products and hundreds of discounts, a free second membership, and a subscription to AARP The Magazine

Join Now

A better view

spinner image man's hands holding camera
iStock

Going on safari? Rent a ­super-telephoto Leica camera lens for about $100 a week from BorrowLenses.com (cost to buy: $1,600). Or capture some aerial footage of your home (and have a little fun with a grandchild). Try out a DJI Mavic drone from Camera Lens Rentals for $151 for three days (cost to buy: about $1,000).

Your personal egg dispenser

spinner image woman standing near chicken coop
iStock

For really fresh eggs, rent chickens and a coop from sites such as Rent-A-Chicken or RentACoop. Two egg-laying hens from RentACoop, feed and gear cost $240 for four weeks. Expect about a dozen eggs a week (cost to buy a high-quality coop: $500; pullets, $20 apiece).

See more Health & Wellness offers >

Bling for the red carpet

spinner image illustration with jewerly
iStock

For your special event, rent an 18-karat white-gold chandelier necklace­, dripping with 4.31 carats of diamonds, from Adorn (cost to buy: $27,375). Have an active social calendar? A regular supply of jewelry from Flont runs $59 to $379 per month, depending on the cost of the items you wish to borrow.