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How does hospice work?

En español | The individual must have a prognosis of six months or less to live and certify that he or she doesn’t wish to pursue curative treatment.

The medical professional then makes a referral to hospice. Members of the hospice staff will conduct an assessment of the patient’s overall needs, as well as establish a care team. Along with the primary caregiver, the hospice team and the patient will outline an appropriate care plan.
 
Hospice comes to the patient in a nursing home, hospice facility, hospital or at home. In hospice care, the patient may access a range of goods and services, such as:

  1. Physician services;
  2. Regular home visits by registered and licensed practical nurses;
  3. Home health aides to assist in activities of daily living, such as dressing and bathing;
  4. Social work and counseling services;
  5. Medical equipment, such as hospital beds and oxygen;
  6. Medical supplies, such as bandages and catheters;
  7. Pain management and symptom control;
  8. Volunteer support to assist caregivers and family members;
  9. Specialized services, such as nutrition counseling and physical, speech and occupational therapy.

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