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The Power of 50+ Voters: Who Are They?

Courting the prized senior voting bloc

The Power of the 50+ Voter

Part 1: Who Are They?


Don’t miss below —

Part 2: How Do They Vote?

Part 3: Their Political Activities & Attitudes

Part 4: On the Issues

 

 

Three of the five generations old enough to vote are 50 plus (the only exception being the very youngest of the boomers). The others are Generation X, made up of those born from 1965 to 1980, and the Millennial Generation, made up of those born after 1980.

The U.S. population is becoming more diverse, generation by generation, reflecting the nation’s changing racial and ethnic makeup. The progression of change can be seen across the five generations shown in this chart, including the three generations that include all 50-plus Americans.

 

Source: “The Generation Gap and the 2012 Election,” Pew Research Center, Nov. 3, 2011.

Households headed by older Americans controlled roughly two-thirds of the nation’s assets at the time of the last official count, and some experts believe their share of the national wealth has increased in the time since.

 

Source: Computations by Brad Edmondson from U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, “Wealth and Asset Ownership: Mean Value of Assets for Households by Type of Asset Owned and Selected Characteristics: 2004.”

While statistics on political contributions by age are hard to come by, the few on-point studies and surveys available show that older Americans tend to be the big givers. Of those who gave a total of at least $250 in political contributions in 2012 and 2013, for example, 57 percent were age 50 or older.

 

Source: “Political Polarization in the American Public,” Detailed Tables (Table 5.3: Political Contributions), Pew Research Center, June 2014.

More Americans are working later in their lives than ever before, partly out of choice and partly out of economic necessity.

 

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Civilian Labor Force Participation Rates, 2013.

Social Security was not intended to be the sole source of income for the nation’s retirees. But over the years it’s become a vital source of income for Americans 65 and older — so much so that it kept 36 percent of them (almost 14 million) out of poverty in 2009.

 

Source: Social Security Administration, Social Security Fact Sheet; AARP Public Policy Institute, “Social Security Is a Critical Income Source for Older Americans: State-Level Estimates, 2007–2009,” September 2011.

It’s all about life expectancy. On average, women in the United States live five years longer than men, though the gap in life expectancy has been narrowing. That’s why women make up an increasingly larger share of America’s 50-plus population as you move up the age scale.

 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 Statistical Abstract.

More Slideshows

Part 2: How Do They Vote?

Part 3: Their Political Activities & Attitudes

Part 4: On the Issues

 

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