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Scam Alert

The Impostor Scam Strikes Again

If you were a victim of investment fraud, watch out

En español | If you've recently lost money in an investment scam, there could be a new bull's-eye on your back.

Sign up for AARP's Money Newsletter.

Watch out for con artists who claim to be with the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC), a very real Washington organization that helps clients of failed brokerage firms recover their money.

Phone scam offers help recovering lost investments

Impostor scam offers to help recover lost investments for a "recovery fee." — Photo by Mike Kemp/age fotostock

Here's how the often two-step scam works:

First, you're phoned or emailed by a supposed SIPC rep, who promises recovery of money you lost in fraudulent investments. But first you need to send a "recovery fee."

If you comply, all you can expect is more requests for money, until you wise up.

Second, if you're wise enough to give nothing, you may be contacted a few weeks later by another SIPC impersonator. This time, you're told that the assets of the company that defrauded you have been seized, and your vanished money is going to be returned.

This time, you're not asked to send a fee, just to fill out an application form that — surprise — asks for your Social Security number and other personal information. Perfect for identity theft or future scam attempts.

A spokesperson for SIPC tells Scam Alert that the corporation learned of this scam in mid-June from numerous people who'd received the calls. Most had previously lost money in investment fraud. "But we also heard from a few who in the past had been approached, but never invested in what later proved to be a fraudulent investment," the spokesperson says.

The SIPC says it has no information on how the impersonators identified their targets.

But in a similar scam last year that zeroed in on people who'd lost money in Bernard Madoff's infamous Ponzi scheme, it was clear how the names were obtained. They'd been made public during the long official investigation of Madoff.

Many of the now-imprisoned financier's victims were contacted by people claiming to be, not from the SIPC, but from a bogus sound-alike agency — the International Security Investor Protection Corporation, or ISIPC, supposedly based in Geneva.

For a while there was a website bearing this solid-sounding name, inviting Madoff victims to file claims for restitution. To do so, they had to provide detailed personal information. Of course, no restitution ever appeared.

Next: What's the most frequent impostor scam? >>

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