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son helps his father with paperwork

En español | Helping parents or other loved ones manage their financial and legal affairs may involve serving as power of attorney for finances or health care, managing income and budgets and being prepared to carry out their long-term wishes. It can be daunting, but being organized and informed can help.

AARP's Caregiving Question and Answer Tool helps you understand legal and financial documents and connect with resources and technology.

 
 

Money Issues and Budgeting Q & A Home

Q: Can I get paid to be a family caregiver?

A: It depends. Some states have programs that help people pay caregivers, including family members. — Read full answer.

 

Q: Is there any technology that will help me organize all the things I need to do for my loved one?

A: Yes. There is technology available via web and mobile devices that help caregivers organize tasks for their loved ones and themselves. — Read full answer.

 

Q: What do I need to do to get my family member/friend’s legal affairs in order?

A: Identify and organize the right documents. In addition, make sure your loved one has a will, a health care power of attorney and a power of attorney for financial decisions. — Read full answer.

 

 
 

Legal Terms and Documents Q & A Home

Q: What is a power of attorney?

A: A power of attorney is a legal document in which an individual chooses to authorize another person to act on his or her behalf for any purpose spelled out in the document. — Read full answer.

 

Q: How do I get power of attorney on behalf of my parents?

A: It is important to realize that a power of attorney is a voluntary authorization that your parent has to have the legal mental capacity to create. — Read full answer.

 

Q: How do I get legal guardianship of my loved one?

A: The process differs by state and jurisdiction, but generally, you will need an attorney to prepare a petition to the appropriate court for guardianship. — Read full answer.

 

Q: What is an advance directive?

A: Advance directives are documents that communicate your medical preferences in the event you are unable to make health care decisions for yourself. — Read full answer.

 

Q: How do I talk to my parents about their long-term wishes?

A: First, come up with an icebreaker on the topic such as: “I’m starting to think about estate planning. Do you have any advice?” A talk of this scope will likely take place over time. — Read full answer.

 

Q: What do I need to do to get my family member/friend’s legal affairs in order?

A: Identify and organize the right documents. In addition, make sure your loved one has a will, a health care power of attorney and a power of attorney for financial decisions. — Read full answer.

 

 
 


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