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Finding Your Way

Your Options for Treating Rotator
Cuff Tears

What's the best treatment for you?

It's a fact of life: As we get older, we're more likely to get hurt when we exercise or take on certain everyday tasks. Routine activities like playing tennis or placing items on shelves can result in a common problem the rotator cuff injury.

Tears in the rotator cuff are not a huge health setback. But they can limit movement and cause serious pain. There are several ways to treat rotator cuff tears, including surgical and nonsurgical treatments. You'll want to understand your options before you make a decision.

To help you, my agency, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), offers a guide called Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears. It explains in plain language how this common, age-related injury is treated and the pros and cons of these treatments.

The good news is that most treatments work. But some options may be better for certain patients. Older or sicker patients, for example, often do better without surgery.

Knowing how your rotator cuff works helps you understand how it can be injured. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that hold the "ball" of your upper arm bone firmly in your shoulder socket. Your rotator cuff allows you to lift and rotate your arms. The tendons can tear much like a piece of leather. Sometimes, the tendon is only slightly damaged. Other times, the tendon suffers a complete tear, meaning that it has torn away from the bone.

Rotator cuff injuries are more common as we age. More than half of adults older than 60 have a partial or complete rotator cuff tear compared with only 4 percent of adults under 40.

Natural wear and tear can cause this injury. An accident, such as falling, also can cause your rotator cuff to tear. So can overuse from repeated actions, such as lifting, painting or throwing.

To choose a treatment, it's important to know how nonsurgical and surgical treatments compare for their ability to relieve pain and restore movement and function.

There are three common ways to treat such tears without surgery: physical or occupational therapy; oral medicines, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen; or steroids taken as a pill or an injection.

Your doctor will make a recommendation based on the damage to the tendon of your rotator cuff. Physical therapy may be enough to improve the pain and weakness, or surgery may be a better choice. In some cases when physical therapy does not improve symptoms, surgery is needed.

In most rotator cuff repair surgeries, a surgeon stitches the torn edges of the muscle or tendon back together or connects the tendon back to the ball of your upper arm bone. The three types of surgery to treat a rotator cuff tear are:

  • Arthroscopic surgery: The surgeon makes very small cuts into the muscles of your shoulder and uses an arthroscope (a small tube attached to a camera and tiny surgical instruments) to repair the tear.
  • Open surgery: The surgeon makes a larger opening into the muscles of your shoulder and repairs the tear with regular surgical instruments.
  • Mini-open surgery: The surgeon uses an arthroscope for the first part of the surgery and then makes an opening large enough to use other surgical instruments for the repair.

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