Alert
Close

Watch the NASCAR race on Sunday at Martinsville Speedway. Join the Drive to End Hunger!

Highlights

Open

2015 LIFE@50+ MIAMI

Miami skyline viewed through palm trees.

Enjoy fun in the sun during Life@50+, May 14-16, 2015

AARP-iPad-ePub-app

AARP TV

Watch episodes of AARP Live and other AARP broadcasts.

Most Popular

Viewed


Books for Grownups - June 2010

AARP The Magazine and the Editors of Publishers Weekly have teamed up to let you know about the latest fiction, nonfiction, and how-to books of interest to you. Once you've checked out the selections below, visit Publishers Weekly's pages for reviews, author Q&As, and more.

 

editors'
picks

The Lotus Eaters

By Tatjana Soli (St. Martin’s Press, $24.99)
This suspenseful and eloquent novel illustrates the violence of the Vietnam War as witnessed by three photographers. It offers a harrowing depiction of how, as the country burned, love and hope triumphed.

A Ticket to the Circus

By Norris Church Mailer (Random House, $26)

Norris Church Mailer delivers an entertaining account of her journey from working as a spunky, hippie art teacher in rural Arkansas to serving (and surviving) the literary world that seemed to revolve around her husband, Norman Mailer.

Crossing Mandelbaum Gate

By Kai Bird (Scribner, $27)
Kai Bird, the Pulitzer-winning author of American Prometheus, crafts a compelling hybrid of memoir and history as he weaves together recollections of his childhood in Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt; the stories of his wife’s parents, who survived the Holocaust; and the results of his own rigorous scholarship on the region.

Complete
Book List

Elysiana

By Chris Knopf (Permanent Press, $28)
Reminding us that Mother Nature never gets old, here’s a story of weather setting the scene on a New Jersey resort island in the summer of 1969. This unsentimental crime novel follows the schemes of various needy, wounded people as a hurricane bears down.

Anthill

By E. O. Wilson (Norton, $24.95)
He may be older than the boomers, but Wilson—Harvard professor, myrmecologist (look it up!), and Pulitzer-winning nonfiction author—embodies the spirit of that generation. In this sparkling fiction debut, his keen eye for the natural world and his grasp of environmental science are embodied in the character of a young boy discovering the natural world.

The Lotus Eaters

By Tatjana Soli (St. Martin’s Press, $24.99)

This suspenseful and eloquent novel illustrates the violence of the Vietnam War as witnessed by three photographers. It offers a harrowing depiction of how, as the country burned, love and hope triumphed.

Something Red

By Jennifer Gilmore (Scribner, $25)
Gilmore takes an extended, documentary-style look at the loyalties that divide a suburban American family in the 1970s (and no, it’s not the Louds!). The pages overflow with the cultural and political ferment (spoilage?) of the era: think energy crisis, Jimmy Carter, and Old School espionage.

Mississippi Vivian

By Bill Crider and Clyde Wilson (Five Star, $25.95)
Set in small-town Mississippi in the summer of 1970, this funny, country-fried mystery involving an insurance scam gets the Southern atmosphere and period details just right.

A Ticket to the Circus

By Norris Church Mailer (Random House, $26)
Norris Church Mailer delivers an entertaining account of her journey from working as a spunky, hippie art teacher in rural Arkansas to serving (and surviving) the literary world that seemed to revolve around her husband, Norman Mailer.

In Pursuit of Silence

By George Prochnik (Doubleday, $25)
Silence is golden—but noise is the far more stimulating commodity in this smart rumination on our modern soundscape. Hopscotching from health advice to spirituality, Prochnik investigates the culture of noise (traffic, TV, iPods, car-stereo tournaments) and the search for silence (which he finally finds—ahhh!—in a Trappist monastery).

Strange Days, Indeed

By Francis Wheen (Public Affairs, $26.95)
The 1970s is the most deranged of decades in this rollicking, lurid retrospective, which appropriates Richard Nixon’s paranoid persecution complex as the tenor of the times. Writing like a very sober—and very British—Hunter S. Thompson, Private Eye deputy editor Wheen offers a vivid, entertaining guide to an era.

The Coming Population Crash

By Fred Pearce (Beacon, $26.95)
“Demography is destiny,” explains Pearce. “But not always in the way we imagine.” We needn’t fear overpopulation, he reports, so much as a devastating incipient population crash. His analysis reveals how political and cultural shifts have shaped—and been shaped by—global population trends.

Crossing Mandelbaum Gate

By Kai Bird (Scribner, $27)
Bird, the Pulitzer-winning author of American Prometheus, crafts a compelling hybrid of memoir and history as he weaves together recollections of his childhood in Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt; the stories of his wife’s parents, who survived the Holocaust; and the results of his own rigorous scholarship on the region.

Skinny Italian

By Teresa Giudice with Heather Maclean (Hyperion $19.99)
In this authentic yet dishy look into food and family, Giudice—infamous for flipping tables and gushing over her “juicy” husband, Joe, on Bravo’s Real Housewives of New Jersey—offers a simple rundown of Italian standards: pesto and puttanesca sauces, veal piccata, steak pizzaiola, almond biscotti, and the classic bellini. Giudice’s anecdotes make this particular guilty pleasure irresistible, because somehow, somewhere, don’t we all long to be “Italiano”?

In the Green Kitchen

By Alice Waters (Clarkson Potter, $28)
Just when you thought you could get out of the kitchen, the queen pulls you back in: restaurateur and chef extraordinaire Waters showcases basic cooking techniques every cook can (and should!) master. (Recipes that utilize each method are presented as well.) Derived from a Slow Food Nation event she helped organize where notable chefs and foodies demonstrated foundational procedures, Waters highlights a set of techniques universal to all cuisines.

How to Never Look Fat Again

By Charla Krupp (Springboard, $26.99)
In How Not to Look Old, Krupp helped readers fend off the ravages of age. In this second outing, she puts her style and beauty savvy—gleaned from her work at Glamour, InStyle, More, and People: Style Watch—to work helping women discover and celebrate their slimmer side. The photos are good, but Krupp hits some sore spots: tube socks, anyone?

The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain

By Barbara Strauch (Viking, $26.95)
Your mind is getting older, but it’s also getting (mostly) better, argues New York Times health editor Strauch in this comforting treatise on our aging gray matter. Drawing on the latest neuroscience research, she separates fact from myth regarding competence and contentment as we age. So get off the couch—or onto it—and do some puzzles, already!

For Better

By Tara Parker-Pope (Dutton, $25.95)
New York Times “Well” blogger Parker-Pope explores the science that can explain why a marriage succeeds. Examining areas such as monogamy, love, sex, children, money, and housework, she translates the science into practical advice. With scientists having calculated that strong marriages have a 5-to-1 ratio of positive to negative interactions, for example, you’ll have to offer five good deeds, kind words, or loving gestures to offset a single infraction!

AARP Bookstore

Discounts & Benefits

From companies that meet the high standards of service and quality set by AARP.

Cirque Du Soleil

Members save up to 20% on live Cirque du Soleil shows with their AARP membership card.

Member Benefit AARP Regal 2

Members pay $8 for Regal ePremiere tickets purchased online. Conditions apply.

Movies Unlimited

Members save 10% on purchases of DVDs & Blu-ray discs from Movies Unlimited.

Member Benefits

Join or renew today! Members receive exclusive member benefits & affect social change.