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AARP Experience Corps is looking for adults 50 years and older interested in tutoring K-3 students who are struggling to read.

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AARP Experience Corps Minneapolis/St. Paul

The AARP Experience Corps program in Minneapolis/St. Paul is hosted by Volunteers of America of Minnesota. Older adults provide literacy tutoring in kindergarten through third-grade classrooms. Tutors are community members who work with students one-on-one or in small groups under supervision of the classroom teacher. They get great personal satisfaction in working with the children and providing a vital service to their community and the national literacy movement.

The mission of Volunteers of America of Minnesota is to help people gain self-reliance, dignity and hope.

Program Launch: 1995

Program Data (2012 – 2013 school year)

  • Schools/centers served: 11
  • Students served: 696
  • Volunteer members: 73
  • Hours logged: over 21187

Program Impact

  • In the 2011-2012 school year:95 percent of teachers rated AARP Experience Corps volunteer members as being good or excellent in their overall quality of assistance.
  • Sixty-five  percent of EC students improved by one or more levels (from far below to below or below to on level, for example)  in reading over the course of the year which demonstrates reading improvement at a rate indicative of catching up.91 percent of volunteer members were satisfied with the guidance they received from AARP Experience Corps site coordinators and staff.

Contact

Project Manager
Paul Simone
7625 Metro Blvd.
Minneapolis, MN 55439
952-945-4164
Fax: 952-945-4105
paul.simone@voamn.org

Featured Quote

When I retired, I was most looking forward to not having to rush off to work in the morning. Now I am hustling off in the morning to a first-grade classroom of high energy, sometimes emotionally needy, children with coughs, runny noses and fingers and pencils in their mouths, and I wouldn't trade it. What makes it worth it? Seeing a girl who knew only seven letters of the alphabet after a year of intensive work in kindergarten now reading a few words, eager to work and proud of her accomplishments. Seeing children who push classroom limits intently focused on reading when given some individual attention and support. If one just looked at outward behavior for brief moments, it would be easy to miss the intense desire of children to learn. I am grateful for the chance to get to know them and support this desire.

—Volunteer tutor at Maxfield Elementary (St. Paul)

Experience Corps