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List of Coronavirus-Related Restrictions in Every State

Some states have begun rolling back reopenings

People walking through a park on a fall day

Noam Galai/Getty Images

En español | Governors across the country are issuing orders and recommendations to their residents on the status of schools, businesses and public services as their states respond to the coronavirus outbreak.

All states have taken coronavirus-related actions, but restrictions vary, and so does the length of time the measures are in place. Here’s a look at each state’s restrictions: 


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• Alabama: At the direction of Gov. Kay Ivey (R), the state health officer has amended a safer-at-home order to remain in effect until 5 p.m. Dec. 11. People over age 6 must wear masks in indoor public spaces, when using a transportation service or when outdoors in gatherings of 10 or more. Nonwork get-togethers are allowed, but individuals from different households must maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Restaurants, bars and breweries can offer dine-in services, but party size is capped at 8 people. Tables or booths must be placed 6 feet apart or, if within 6 feet, must be separated by partitions. Hair salons and similar personal-care businesses must also keep clients 6-feet apart or separate clients by partitions if within 6 feet. Retail stores and gyms are among businesses that must implement sanitation and social distancing practices. Beaches are open, but patrons must practice social distancing. As of Oct. 2, hospital, nursing and long-term care facilities have been allowed to permit residents to receive one visitor at a time, subject to other restrictions.

• Alaska: Gov. Mike Dunleavy (R) modified a travel mandate that requires those arriving in Alaska to show a negative COVID-19 test or agree to be tested on arrival ($250). Self-quarantining for 14 days is no longer an option for nonresidents (Alaska residents returning to the state can opt to self-quarantine for two weeks). Critical infrastructure workers are exempt. Previously, Dunleavy permitted all businesses, including restaurants, hair salons, gyms, museums and entertainment venues to reopen at 100 percent capacity. Safeguards are recommended. In group gatherings, individuals from separate households are encouraged to maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. Local authorities and private businesses can enact stricter requirements.

• Arizona: Gov. Doug Ducey (R) and the Arizona Department of Health Services released requirements and guidelines for gyms, movie theaters and water parks to reopen. Under the new guidance, the businesses can operate at a limited capacity if certain benchmarks are met. Restaurants can offer indoor dining service but must limit occupancy. Large gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited, but local authorities can approve them if certain safety precautions are met.

• Arkansas: Under the direction of Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R), the health department continues to modify coronavirus-related orders and directives. The state moved to phase 2 of its reopening plan on June 15. Restaurants can expand to 66 percent seating capacity for indoor or outdoor dining services as long as other restrictions are followed. Gyms, fitness centers, hair salons and spas can operate if they have safety precautions in place. Visitor centers at state parks and shops can reopen, and residents can rent cabins and lodges. With an approved plan, indoor and outdoor entertainment venues can hold events of up to 66 percent capacity. For gatherings of 100 people or fewer, no approved plan is required. Everyone age 10 or older must wear a mask whether indoors or outdoors if they are with nonhousehold members and if social distancing cannot be maintained. (Face coverings aren’t required at private residences.)

As of July 1, family and friends of those in nursing homes and care facilities have been permitted to visit if the facilities have met state health department requirements. Previously, Hutchinson issued an order protecting businesses from liability for damages or injury relating to coronavirus exposure. There is an exception for “willful, malicious or intentional misconduct.”

• California: Under the direction of Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), the health department has issued a partial stay-at-home order. Under the state’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy, each county falls into one of four color-coded tiers: purple (where the virus is most widespread), red, orange and yellow (where the virus is minimally widespread). With the new order, individuals who live in a purple tier county are prohibited from engaging in activities outside the home or gathering with others between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. The order takes effect at 10 p.m. Nov. 21 and lasts until 5 a.m. Dec. 21.

Previously, Newsom permitted gatherings statewide, but no more than three households can attend, and the space must be big enough to allow people to practice social distancing. In the purple tier, only outdoor gatherings are allowed. Restaurants can offer only outdoor dining, and retail stores must limit capacity to 25 percent. Hair salons and barbershops can offer indoor services, with restrictions. Gyms and fitness centers can open only outdoors. Many other nonessential businesses, such as nightclubs, theme parks and concert venues, remain closed.

Once in the red tier, restaurants can resume indoor dining at 25 percent capacity or 100 patrons, whichever is fewer. Retail stores can operate at 50 percent capacity, and museums can open indoors at 25 percent capacity. For counties in the orange tier, bars and breweries that don’t serve food are among businesses that can open for outdoor services. For counties in the yellow tier, most businesses can reopen but must still follow safety precautions.

For a full list of restrictions, visit covid19.ca.gov. Newsom has ordered everyone to wear a face mask in public spaces; children under age 2 and people with certain medical disabilities are among those exempt. He also signed a bill into law that requires businesses to report COVID-19 outbreaks to local officials and any employees who may have been exposed to the virus while at work.

• Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis (D) announced changes to the state’s safer-at-home and stay-at-home orders. Counties fall into one of six color-coded levels of risk, depending on the incidents of COVID-19. Level green is the least restrictive, under which businesses can operate at 50 percent capacity or 500 people, whichever is smaller. In level-blue counties, restaurants, indoor event venues and houses of worship can operate at 50 percent capacity or 175 people, whichever is smaller. In yellow counties, public and private gatherings cannot exceed 10 participants or people from more than two households. Restaurants can operate at 50 percent capacity, with a maximum of 50 people per room (the maximum might be higher for larger establishments). In orange counties, public and private gatherings cannot exceed 10 participants or people from more than two households. Restaurants can operate at 25 percent capacity, with a maximum of 50 patrons per room. In red counties, restaurants must halt indoor dining, but outdoor table service, delivery and takeout are permitted. Gatherings with members outside the household are prohibited, and indoor events are closed. Limited exceptions include gatherings at houses of worship, which can operate indoors at 25 percent capacity or 50 people (whichever is smaller). Outdoor events are limited to 25 percent capacity or 75 people (whichever is smaller). Retail stores can operate at 50 percent capacity and personal-care services at 25 percent capacity. Gyms can operate at 10 percent capacity, with a maximum of 10 people. No counties are in the most restrictive purple level.

A mask mandate remains in effect. People 11 and older must wear a face covering in indoor public spaces or while using public transportation or ride-hailing services. Workplaces can deny service or admission to customers who aren’t wearing a face mask. An organization can request a waiver from the state for certain indoor activities if wearing a mask during an activity is not practical.

• Connecticut: Gov. Ned Lamont (D) rolled the state back to phase 2.1 (from phase 3) of its reopening plan. Restaurants must restrict indoor dining services to 50 percent capacity and close by 10 p.m., among other restrictions. Personal-service businesses and libraries can remain at 75 percent capacity, among other phase 3 rules. Indoor performing arts centers can operate at 50 percent capacity with a cap of 100 people, and parties must maintain a 6-foot distance between each other. At private residences, indoor and outdoor gatherings are capped at 10 people. At commercial venues, indoor gatherings are capped at 25 people and outdoor gatherings are capped at 50 people. Previously, Lamont ordered anyone over age 2 to wear a face covering in public places, indoors or outdoors, when social distancing cannot be maintained. People who qualify for a medical exemption must have written documentation. Travelers arriving from states with high COVID-19 infection rates must self-quarantine for 14 days. Most recently, Lamont signed an order authorizing local health directors to impose a $10,000 fine per violation on businesses that hold events over gathering capacity limits. 

• Delaware: Gov. John Carney (D) announced new restrictions on gatherings. Effective 8 a.m. Nov. 23, indoor gatherings at private residences cannot exceed 10 people. Gatherings at places for weddings, funerals and performances are among those that must limit capacity to 30 percent of the venue’s fire occupancy or 50 people (whichever is smaller). Outdoor public gatherings are capped at 50 people, but larger groups can gather with permission from the health department. Restaurants must limit indoor dining to 30 percent of the venue’s fire occupancy. Previously, Carney signed an order combining coronavirus-related restrictions. Individuals must wear a face covering when in public places, including grocery stores and on mass transit. Face coverings aren’t required outdoors when social distancing can be maintained. Retail stores, houses of worship and most other businesses can operate at 60 percent capacity, with restrictions. Exercise facilities and senior and adult day-care centers must remain at 30 percent capacity. The Division of Public Health has recommended not socializing with anyone outside your household and not spending holiday dinners with anyone outside your household, even family members.

• District of Columbia: Mayor Muriel Bowser (D) issued adjustments to Phase 2 of the District’s reopening plan, effective Nov. 25. Outdoor gatherings of more than 25 people (down from 50) are prohibited. Indoor gatherings are capped at 10 people. Restaurants can continue to offer indoor dining at 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions, such as spacing tables 6 feet apart and limiting the size of a party to six people. However, restaurants must stop alcohol service at 10 p.m. And effective Dec. 14, restaurants will be required to restrict occupancy to 25 percent of its indoor capacity. Houses of worship must operate at 50 percent capacity or 50 people, whichever is smaller. Gyms and recreation facilities cannot hold indoor group classes. Outdoor group classes must be capped at 25 people. Retail establishments can reopen for indoor shopping but must limit occupancy to 50 percent. Hair salons and barbershops may reopen, but customers must make appointments, along with other safeguards. The Smithsonian Institution decided to temporarily close its museums, galleries and the National Zoo, starting Nov. 23, as a public health precaution, although it isn’t required to do so. The institution’s outdoor gardens will remain open. Under Phase 2 guidelines, museums can operate at reduced capacity and with other safety protocols in place.

Previously, Bowser updated a travel advisory for individuals arriving in D.C. People arriving in the District from an area with a high rate of infection must get tested 72 hours before arrival and then tested again three to five days after arriving. D.C. residents returning from out-of-state travel must limit activities for two weeks or get tested upon their return. Travelers from Maryland and Virginia are exempt. Bowser ordered people older than 2 to wear a mask when leaving their residences if more than fleeting contact with others is likely.

• Florida: Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) signed an order lifting most coronavirus-related restrictions and moving the state to Phase 3 of its reopening plan, under which all businesses can reopen. Restaurants and bars are no longer subject to occupancy restrictions. However, city or county governments can impose occupancy limits on restaurants and bars (to as low as 50 percent capacity) if authorities state in the local order why the restriction is necessary for public health. DeSantis’ new order also removes fees or penalties for individuals who don’t follow social distancing practices, including mask mandates. The order went into effect Sept. 25.

• Georgia: Gov. Brian Kemp (R) signed an order extending restrictions related to COVID-19 through Nov. 30. People living in long-term care facilities and other at-risk individuals, such as those with severe lung or heart disease, must continue to shelter in place. Kemp has strongly encouraged everyone to wear face masks while outside the home but stopped short of requiring it. Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed, but individuals must maintain a 6-foot distance from each other. Restaurants must adhere to strict sanitation and social distancing guidelines. Gyms, hair salons and movie theaters are among businesses that can operate, with restrictions.

• Hawaii: Gov. David Ige (D) replaced a stay-at-home order with a safer-at-home order for residents of the island of Lanai. Residents are now encouraged, but not required, to stay and work from home. Most of the state is under the Act With Care plan for reopening, which allows many businesses to resume operations, with restrictions. Oahu is under tier 2, in which most businesses are limited to operating at 50 percent capacity and gatherings of more than five people are prohibited. Previously, Ige extended a partial quarantine between islands. Interisland travelers who arrive in Kauai, Hawaii, Maui or Kalawao must self-quarantine for 14 days (travelers to Kauai and Maui can bypass the mandate with a negative COVID-19 test result). People arriving in Hawaii from out of state must show a negative COVID-19 test result or self-quarantine for 14 days. Earlier, Ige issued an order requiring people to wear a face mask while inside a business or while waiting in line to enter one.

• Idaho: Amid a surge of coronavirus cases, Gov. Brad Little (R) signed an order rolling the state back to a modified approach to stage 2 of its reopening plan. Indoor or outdoor gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, and social distancing must be maintained at gatherings that are permitted. Religious and political gatherings are exempt. Restaurants and bars can continue to operate. Customers must remain seated, and tables must be spaced 6 feet apart. Little stopped short of issuing a statewide mask mandate, but masks are required at long-term care facilities. Businesses may remain open, but they should encourage teleworking when possible.

• Illinois: Due to a spike in coronavirus cases, Gov. J.B. Pritzker (D) moved all counties to tier-3 restrictions and announced new guidelines. Effective Nov. 20, businesses should have employees work remotely as much as possible. Restaurants and bars must close between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. and cannot offer indoor service. Outdoor dining is permitted, but reservations are required, tables must be spaced 6 feet apart, and party size is limited to six people. Grocery stores must limit capacity to 50 percent, and retail stores, to 25 percent. Gyms and fitness centers must also limit capacity to 25 percent and cannot hold indoor classes. Personal-care services must limit capacity to 25 percent, with a maximum of 25 people. Indoor gatherings are limited to household members. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 10 people, and social distancing must be maintained. A statewide mask mandate requires anyone over age 2 to wear a face covering when indoors in a public space or when outside if a 6-foot distance between people cannot be maintained.

• Indiana: Gov. Eric Holcomb (R) announced the state will move away from its stage 5 restrictions and toward a county-by-county approach. Counties designated as red (the highest risk of virus spread) must limit social gatherings to 25 people. Counties designated as orange must limit social gatherings to 50 people. A statewide mask mandate remains in effect. People must wear a face covering when in an indoor public space, when outdoors if social distancing cannot be maintained and when using public transportation. Previously, Holcomb lifted nearly all restrictions on businesses.

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett announced that effective Nov. 15, Marion County indoor bars, gyms, museums and other entertainment venues must limit capacity to 25 percent. Restaurants must limit indoor dining services to 50 percent capacity and cannot seat parties larger than six.

• Iowa: Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed a proclamation imposing a mask mandate and tightening restrictions on gatherings to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. Individuals age 2 and older must wear a mask in public indoor spaces if within 6 feet of others from outside their household for 15 minutes or longer. Exceptions include when exercising, when participating in a religious gathering, or when eating or drinking at a restaurant. Social and recreational gatherings cannot exceed 15 people indoors or 30 people outdoors unless everyone lives in the same household. Restaurants and bars may remain open for on-premises dining but must close between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m., among other restrictions. Other nonessential businesses, such as amusement parks, movie theaters, museums, hair salons, barbershops, gyms, retail stores and massage parlors, can resume operations if safety precautions are taken.

• Kansas: Gov. Laura Kelly (D) issued a mask mandate, effective Nov. 25. Individuals over age 5 must wear a face covering in indoor public spaces, when obtaining health care services, while using transportation services, or in outdoor public spaces if a 6-foot distance between non-household members cannot be maintained. Businesses must also require employees, customers and visitors to wear a face mask when in an enclosed space where social distancing cannot be maintained, or when in an area where food is being prepared or packaged, among other circumstances. Counties can opt out of the mandate or issue their own. Previously, Kelly announced that counties should come up with their own plans to reopen businesses. A statewide plan to restart the economy in phases offers guidance, but counties aren’t required to follow it. The state Department of Health and Environment mandated a 14-day home quarantine for people arriving in Kansas who traveled to certain states or countries with widespread transmission or attended an out-of-state mass gathering and didn’t wear a mask and practice social distancing. The mandate also applies to anyone who traveled on a cruise ship on or after March 15.

• Kentucky: Gov. Andy Beshear (D) announced new restrictions amid a surge of COVID-19 cases. Private indoor gatherings are capped at 8 people and cannot include people from more than two households. Indoor event venues and theaters must limit occupancy to 25 people per room. Restaurants and bars must suspend indoor dining but can still offer outdoor dining, takeout and pickup. Gyms, fitness centers and other recreational facilities cannot hold indoor classes and must limit capacity to 33 percent. Retail stores and personal care services, such as hair salons, must limit capacity to 50 percent. The new order went into effect Nov. 20 and lasts until Dec. 13. Previously, Beshear extended a mask mandate that requires anyone over age 5 to wear a face covering while inside a public space, while using public transportation or while outdoors if social distancing cannot be maintained.

• Louisiana: Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) announced he is rolling the state back from phase 3 to a modified version of phase 2 restrictions of the state’s reopening plan. Effective Nov. 25 and lasting until Dec. 23, restaurants must reduce indoor dining capacity to 50 percent and must stop serving alcohol by 11 p.m., among other restrictions. Bars must suspend indoor food and drink consumption in parishes with a high rate of COVID-19. Outdoor service is permitted, but seating is capped at 50 patrons. For parishes with a low positivity rate, bars can reopen for indoor dining at a limited capacity, and alcohol service must stop at 11 p.m. Hair salons, beauty shops, and gyms are among businesses that must reduce capacity to 50 percent (down from 75 percent) and close waiting areas, among other restrictions. Retail stores must also limit capacity to 50 percent. Amusement parks, concert halls and children’s indoor play centers are among businesses that must remain closed. Indoor social gatherings are capped at 75 people or 25 percent capacity of the facility. Outdoor social gatherings of more than 150 people are permitted only if individuals from separate households can maintain a 6-foot distance from one another. People 8 and older must wear a mask in public spaces, indoors or outdoors, unless social distancing can be maintained. 

• Maine: Gov. Janet Mills (D) signed an order imposing tighter restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus. From Nov. 20 to Dec. 6, restaurants, bars, movie theaters and performing arts venues are among businesses that must close by 9 p.m. The state is in phase 4 of its reopening plan. Indoor gatherings are limited to 50 people, including restaurants, movie theaters and other businesses with indoor seating. A 6-foot distance between seating areas is required, among other precautions. Bars and tasting rooms can continue to offer outdoor dining. Gyms and other indoor businesses without seating must cap occupancy at 50 people. Retail businesses can allow five people per 1,000 square feet. Outdoor gatherings will remain limited to 100 people. Face coverings are mandatory statewide for anyone 5 and older in public spaces, even if social distancing can be maintained. A travel mandate requires those visiting Maine to show a negative COVID-19 test or opt to self-quarantine for 14 days. Travelers from some states, including Vermont and New Hampshire, are exempt.

• Maryland: Gov. Larry Hogan (R) again rolled back some of the state’s reopening plans in response to a spike in cases. Effective 5 p.m. on Nov. 20, retail stores and religious centers must restrict operations to 50 percent of the venue’s maximum occupancy (down from 75 percent). Fitness centers and personal-service businesses, such as beauty salons and barbershops, can operate at 50 percent capacity, with restrictions. Senior centers remain closed. Restaurants must restrict dine-in service to 50 percent capacity (down from 75 percent) and close for on-premises dining between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Restaurants continue to be prohibited from offering buffets, among other measures. Under Hogan’s direction, the health department has recommended a cap of 25 people on private indoor and outdoor gatherings. Previously, Hogan issued a mask mandate requiring people over age 5 to wear a face covering in the public spaces of all businesses or areas outdoors where social distancing cannot be maintained.

Montgomery County Executive Mark Elrich issued an order requiring tighter restrictions, effective Nov. 11. Restaurants and other food establishments must limit indoor dining to 25 percent maximum occupancy. Retail stores, fitness centers, places of worship and museums are among businesses that must also abide by a 25 percent capacity limit. The county health department also issued an order, effective 5 p.m. Nov. 24, prohibiting gatherings of over 10 people (down from 25). Baltimore Mayor Jack Young issued an order limiting indoor and outdoor gatherings to 10 people. Restaurants and other food establishments cannot offer indoor dining at more than 25 percent of maximum occupancy. Retail stores, indoor recreational facilities and places of worship are also among the businesses limited to 25 percent capacity.

• Massachusetts: Gov. Charlie Baker (R) tightened restrictions on the state’s reopening plan. An advisory takes effect Nov. 6, instructing residents to stay at home between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. Exceptions include going to work and the grocery store. Baker ordered certain businesses to close by 9:30 p.m., such as movie theaters, gyms, hair salons and casinos. Restaurants must stop table service at 9:30 p.m. but can still offer takeout and delivery. Baker is also reducing the limits on gatherings. At private residences, indoor get-togethers are capped at 10 people; those held outdoors at people’s homes are limited to 25 people. Indoor gatherings at event venues or public settings are capped at 25 people. Outdoor gatherings at event venues or public settings are capped at 100 people in low-risk communities and at 50 people in communities not considered low risk. Baker also modified a statewide mask mandate. Everyone over age 5 must wear a mask in public places, indoors or outdoors, even if social distancing is possible.

Previously, Baker ordered travelers entering the state to self-quarantine for 14 days or show a negative COVID-19 test result. Travelers from states with low rates of COVID-19 are among those who are exempt.

• Michigan: Under the direction of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) the health department ordered a pause that sets new restrictions on gatherings and certain businesses, effective Nov. 18. Indoor gatherings at private residences cannot include people from more than two households. Outdoor gatherings are allowed but capped at 25 people.

Restaurants, bars and other food establishments must close indoor dining. Outdoor dining, takeout and delivery are still permitted. Movie theaters, bowling alleys and casinos are among businesses that must close. Gyms can remain open with safety protocols in place and cannot offer group fitness classes. Personal care businesses, such as hair salons, can remain open but by appointment only. Previously, the health department ordered individuals 5 and older to wear a face mask at nonresidential gatherings.

On Oct. 2, the Michigan Supreme Court struck down orders from Whitmer outlining pandemic-related restrictions. The court ruled that a 1945 law Whitmer relied on to issue the orders was unconstitutional, and that Whitmer thus lacked the authority for her actions. In response to the ruling, the state health department has issued the new orders by drawing on another law.

• Minnesota: Due to a spike in cases, Gov. Tim Walz (D) announced changes tightening coronavirus-related restrictions. Effective Nov. 13 at 10 p.m., both indoor and outdoor gatherings are capped at 10 people, and members from no more than three households can be together at a social gathering. Event spaces that host a gathering, such as wedding receptions or funeral receptions, must limit gatherings to 50 people as of Nov. 27, and to 25 people as of Dec. 11. Walz closed bar counter service at restaurants and other food establishments. Restaurants may continue to offer indoor dining at 50 percent capacity, but with a cap of 150 people (down from 250). No indoor dining is permitted between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m. (takeout and delivery is okay). Previously, Walz ordered people age 5 and up to wear a mask when inside public spaces or outside when social distancing cannot be practiced. Under phase 3 of the state’s Stay Safe plan, gyms, movie theaters, concert halls and museums can open but must limit the number of visitors. Personal-care businesses, such as hair and nail salons, may reopen with safety and sanitation practices in place. Retail stores can continue to allow a limited number of customers inside.

• Mississippi: Gov. Tate Reeves (R) signed an order updating coronavirus-related restrictions. Health care facilities that perform nonelective procedures must reserve 10 percent of their capacity for COVID-19 patients. The order also alters restrictions on group gatherings. In certain counties where the rate of infection is high, indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people and outdoor gatherings to 50 if social distancing cannot be maintained. In those counties, individuals must wear masks when inside a school, business or public space. In the remaining counties, indoor gatherings are limited to 20 people and outdoor gatherings to 100 if social distancing cannot be maintained.

In all counties, some gatherings are exempt, such as those at religious organizations or students meeting in classrooms. Previously, Reeves ordered bars and restaurants to serve alcohol only to seated patrons and not after 11 p.m. Most businesses must limit customers or visitors to 75 percent capacity and implement safety precautions. Visitors to nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should spend time with family members only and avoid contact with other residents, among other restrictions.

• Missouri: Gov. Mike Parson (R) announced that the state will fully reopen on June 16. According to a press release issued by the governor’s office, “All statewide restrictions will be lifted, though local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations or ordinances in place.” Parson encouraged people to maintain social distancing and take precautions, such as practicing good hygiene and avoiding large crowds.

• Montana: Gov. Steve Bullock (D) directed individuals in counties experiencing four or more active cases of COVID-19 to wear a mask in indoor public spaces or when outdoors if 50 or more people are gathered and social distancing cannot be maintained. Children under age 5 are among those who are exempt. Previously, Bullock directed the state’s economy to reopen in phases. Phase 2 began June 1. All businesses can operate and should implement social distancing. Telework is encouraged where feasible. Gyms, fitness centers, pools, movie theaters and restaurants can increase capacity to 75 percent. People are encouraged to maintain a 6-foot distance from others when in public and to avoid gathering in groups of more than 50. People over 65 and other vulnerable populations are encouraged to stay at home. Senior centers and assisted living facilities cannot allow visitors.

• Nebraska: Gov. Pete Ricketts (R) announced changes to the state’s directed health measures. Effective Nov. 11, parties must maintain a 6-foot distance at indoor gatherings, including places such as gyms, churches and clubs. Bars and restaurants can operate at 100 percent capacity, but parties are limited to eight people and patrons must remain seated except in limited circumstances, such as when placing an order or using the restroom. Gatherings at theaters, arenas, stadiums, auctions and similar establishments are limited to 25 percent capacity if indoors (down from 50 percent) and 100 percent capacity if outdoors, but not to exceed 10,000 people in any setting. Ricketts announced most elective medical procedures are temporarily suspended to free up hospital beds. Businesses are encouraged to follow recommended guidance.

How Social Distancing Helps Everyone

• Nevada: Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) announced more restrictions in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19. Effective Nov. 24, private gatherings cannot exceed more than 10 people and cannot include members from more than two households. Public gatherings are capped at 25 percent capacity or 50 people, whichever is smaller. Large events are temporarily suspended. Businesses can remain open, but restaurants, bars and gyms are among those that must now operate at 25 percent fire code capacity. Retail and grocery stores can continue to operate at 50 percent fire code capacity with other safety and sanitation protocols in place. People over age 9 must wear a face covering whenever they leave home, indoors or outdoors, including at private gatherings. Sisolak said the new measures will last for three weeks.

• New Hampshire: Gov. Chris Sununu (R) ordered individuals over age 5 to wear face coverings in indoor or outdoor public spaces if social distancing with people outside the household cannot be maintained. Exceptions include individuals who are exercising, in school, or eating or drinking. The order went into effect Nov. 20 and lasts until Jan. 15. Restaurants can resume both indoor and outdoor dining services, but tables should be spaced 6 feet apart, among other guidelines. Gyms can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Previously, Sununu permitted retail stores, hair salons, barbershops and similar businesses to reopen, with restrictions. Travelers, visitors and residents arriving in the state after high-risk travel must meet self-quarantine restrictions.

• New Jersey: Gov. Phil Murphy (D) ordered tighter coronavirus-related restrictions for gatherings. Indoor gatherings are capped at 25 percent of a room’s capacity, with a maximum of 10 people. Gatherings for weddings, funerals or religious or political activities are among indoor events with looser restrictions (25 percent of the room’s capacity or 150 people). Movie theaters and other indoor entertainment venues must also limit capacity to 25 percent or 150 people (whichever is smaller). For now, outdoor gatherings of up to 500 people are allowed, though attendees must remain 6 feet from one another. As of 6 a.m. Nov. 23, outdoor gatherings are capped at 150 people. No gathering limit applies to outdoor religious or political events. Previously, Murphy ordered restaurants, bars and other food establishments to stop offering indoor service between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. (outdoor dining, takeout and delivery are okay). Seating at bar areas is prohibited; however, restaurants can place tables closer than 6 feet apart if a physical barrier is in place. Personal care businesses, such as nail salons and barbershops, must take appointments and perform temperature checks, among other requirements. Murphy ordered people to wear face coverings when outside in public spaces if social distancing cannot be maintained. Wearing cloth masks is required in grocery stores and other indoor public spaces, including indoor gatherings.

• New Mexico: Under the direction of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D), the health department issued a stay-at-home order effective Nov. 16. Exceptions include leaving the home for essentials, such as food or medication. Gatherings of more than five people are prohibited. Restaurants and other food establishments must close on-site dining but may offer takeout or delivery. Close-contact businesses, such as hair salons and gyms, must close. Tennis courts, golf courses and other outdoor recreational facilities must also close. Grocery stores, churches and certain retail stores can operate at 25 percent capacity with a cap of 75 people. Of the retail stores that can remain open, they must close by 10 p.m. Lujan Grisham will amend a travel order requiring people arriving in New Mexico from states with a high COVID-19 infection rate to self-quarantine for 14 days. The stay-at-home order lasts until Nov. 30

• New York: Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced new restrictions in response to the ongoing spread of COVID-19. Effective at 10 p.m. Nov. 13, indoor and outdoor private gatherings are limited to 10 people. Restaurants and gyms are among businesses that must close between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. Restaurants can still offer takeout and delivery during those hours. Previously, Cuomo announced guidelines for out-of-state travelers arriving in New York. To opt out of a 14-day quarantine requirement, travelers must get tested within three days before arriving, quarantine for three days upon arrival and then get tested again on day four. Both tests must be negative to opt out of the 14-day quarantine. Essential workers and travelers from border states are exempt. The state is in Phase 4 of its reopening plan. Among other restrictions, indoor dining can resume at 25 percent capacity in New York City. Restaurants in all other regions can resume dine-in service at 50 percent capacity. Zoos, nature parks, outdoor museums and other low-risk outdoor arts and entertainment venues can reopen at 33 percent capacity; indoor arts and entertainment venues can open at 25 percent capacity; and gyms and fitness centers can operate at 33 percent capacity. Movie theaters can reopen in some counties at 25 percent capacity, with no more than 50 people per theater. Individuals over age 2 must wear a face mask in public if social distancing cannot be maintained. The governor also issued an order permitting businesses to deny entry to anyone who is not wearing a mask. Cuomo extended a pause on evictions for those who cannot pay rent because of a COVID-19 hardship.

• North Carolina: Gov. Roy Cooper (D) signed an order tightening the restrictions for mask requirements. Unless at home, individuals age 5 and older must wear a face covering in any indoor place when around people outside the household whether or not social distancing can be maintained. Individuals must also wear a mask outdoors unless a physical distance of 6 feet among those outside the household can be consistently maintained. The new requirements mean masks must be worn while exercising in gyms or exercising outdoors within 6 feet of a non-household member. The amended mask mandate goes into effect Nov. 25 and lasts until Dec. 11.

Currently, the state is in a modified approach to Phase 3 of its reopening plan. Indoor gatherings are currently capped at 10 people. Outdoor gatherings are capped at 50 people. Social distancing must be practiced. Entertainment facilities such as bars and movie theaters can reopen with restrictions. Bars can offer only outdoor service and must restrict capacity to 30 percent or seven people for every 1,000 square feet. Large outdoor venues, such as stadiums, can also reopen but must limit capacity to 7 percent. Restaurants, gyms, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as hair salons can continue to operate with capacity limits, among other restrictions. Restaurants continue to be prohibited from serving alcohol after 11 p.m.

• North Dakota: Under the directions of Gov. Doug Burgum (R), the state health officer, Dirk Wilke, issued a mask mandate that required individuals age 5 and older to wear a mask in indoor public spaces and businesses or when outdoors when social distancing cannot be maintained. Burgum also ordered new restrictions on certain businesses amid a surge of COVID-19 cases. Restaurants and other food establishments must limit services to 50 percent capacity or 150 people (whichever is smaller). In-person dining is prohibited between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m., but takeout and delivery is still OK during that time. Event venues, like ballrooms, are limited to 25 percent capacity with a cap on the number of people. The cap differs based on the designation on each county under the state’s Smart Restart plan.

• Ohio: Gov. Mike DeWine (R) ordered a three-week curfew, effective Nov. 19. Individuals must stay in their homes between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. Exceptions include leaving to go to work, to grocery stores, or for other emergencies or essentials. People statewide are required to wear face coverings when inside a location that is not a residence, when using public transportation or when outside if a 6-foot distance between nonhousehold members cannot be maintained. Children younger than 10 and individuals with certain medical conditions are among those exempt. Stores are required to have signs about face coverings and to ensure that employees and customers wear masks. A Retail Compliance Unit will conduct inspections to make sure stores are complying with the order. Gatherings of more than 10 people have been prohibited since April, but DeWine announced that tighter restrictions will be issued that won’t allow dancing or games.

Under the current health advisory to reopen the state’s economy, gyms and other fitness venues can resume operations if they follow safety protocols. Restaurants can offer table service indoors, with restrictions. Restaurants and bars are banned from selling alcohol after 10 p.m. Retail stores may reopen, but certain sanitation and social distancing practices must be implemented. Hair salons and other close-care businesses can reopen, provided they abide by strict sanitation rules. Nonessential medical procedures may resume, and nonessential offices and construction and manufacturing businesses may restart operations. Some sports competitions can resume, but strict restrictions, such as daily symptom assessments, must be in place. DeWine also advised travelers arriving in Ohio from states with a high rate of COVID-19 to self-quarantine for 14 days, but he stopped short of requiring it.

• Oklahoma: Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) announced that effective Nov. 19, restaurants and bars must space tables 6 feet apart and close in-dining service by 11 p.m. (takeout and delivery are still allowed). Stitt also announced that as of Nov. 19, individuals must wear masks in state buildings. All counties are in the moderate (orange) phase for COVID-19 risk. Guidance for individuals in this phase encourages small gatherings, limiting travel and wearing a face mask in public spaces. Guidance for businesses includes offering teleworking options for employees when possible. Businesses should also implement sanitation and social distancing practices.

•  Oregon: Gov. Kate Brown (D) ordered a two-week freeze to try to stop the spread of COVID-19. The freeze starts Nov. 18 and lasts until Dec. 2. Indoor and outdoor gatherings are capped at six people and cannot include a mix of individuals from more than two households. Houses of worship must limit services to 25 people indoors or 50 people outdoors. Patients at long-term care facilities can no longer receive visitors. Restaurants can offer takeout and delivery, but not in-dining services. Grocery stores and retails stores are among places that must limit capacity to 75 percent. Gyms, museums and event venues are among businesses that must close. Personal services businesses, such as hair salons, and outdoor recreational facilities may remain open but must implement safety protocols. Previously, Brown ordered people 5 and older to wear face coverings in outdoor areas where a 6-foot distance cannot be maintained and in indoor public spaces.

• Pennsylvania: Under the direction of Gov. Tom Wolf (D), the health department updated coronavirus-related restrictions. Restaurants, bars and other businesses in the food industry must suspend alcohol sales for on-site consumption at 5 p.m. on Nov. 25 only. Indoor and outdoor limits on gatherings have been reduced, but the cap depends on the maximum occupancy of a space. The limits are to be determined by using an occupancy calculator. Restaurants that have self-certified can offer indoor dining at 50 percent capacity. Gyms, hair salons, nail salons, tattoo parlors and other close-contact businesses can reopen with restrictions. Individuals age 2 and older must wear a face covering in indoor public zones. Masks are also required outdoors if a 6-foot distance between non-household members cannot be maintained. Previously, the governor announced that Pennsylvania Turnpike tollbooths will stop taking cash.

• Rhode Island: Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) announced the state will enter a two-week pause in reopening, effective Nov. 30. Bar areas of inside restaurants and other food and drink establishments, gyms and recreational venues, such as bowling alleys, are among places that must close. Offices must close to the maximum extent possible. Restaurants can continue to offer indoor dining but must reduce capacity to 33 percent, and only members from the same household can sit at a table together. Retail stores must limit customers to one person per 100 square feet (or one person per 150 square feet if a big-box retailer). Houses of worship must limit capacity to 25 percent with a maximum of 125 people. Personal care services can remain open under phase 3 guidelines.

Previously, Raimondo issued a stay-at-home advisory between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. Sundays through Thursdays, and 10:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Raimondo also placed further restrictions on public and private gatherings. Social gatherings are now restricted to members of a single household, whether indoors or outdoors. Events with a licensed caterer or at a restaurant are capped at 25 people if indoors, or 75 people if outdoors.

Individuals older than 2 must wear a face covering in public spaces, whether indoors or outdoors, if social distancing cannot be maintained. Face masks are also required when using taxis, ride-hailing services or similar transportation services. Anyone arriving in Rhode Island from an area with a high community COVID-19 spread rate must self-quarantine for 14 days or provide results of a negative coronavirus test.

• South Carolina: Gov. Henry McMaster (R) issued an order lifting occupancy limits on restaurants. Eateries can operate at 100 percent capacity but must continue to require patrons to wear a face covering when inside except when they are eating or drinking. Tables must be spaced at least 6 feet apart, and alcohol sales are prohibited after 11 p.m., among other restrictions. Entertainment venues, such as theaters and concert halls, can reopen at 50 percent occupancy or 250 people (whichever is smaller). Masks are required. Other nonessential businesses can reopen; guidelines are recommended. Beaches are open, but the governor has authorized local authorities to close or restrict public access points if it’s necessary to protect visitors’ health.

• South Dakota: Gov. Kristi Noem signed an order putting the state’s “Back to Normal” plan in effect. The plan encourages employers to sanitize high-traffic areas and screen employees for illness. Retail businesses should operate in a manner that promotes social distancing and should consider limiting the number of customers inside their stores. The plan also encourages, but doesn’t require, older adults and other vulnerable individuals to stay at home.

• Tennessee: Gov. Bill Lee (R) signed an order removing many coronavirus-related restrictions for businesses and gatherings in 89 counties. (The remaining six counties are subject to the restrictions of their health departments.) People with COVID-19 or its symptoms are required to stay at home. Social distancing is still encouraged when individuals interact with others outside the household. Long-term care facilities may receive visitors if certain requirements are met. Lee extended a provision that permits local authorities to issue a face mask requirement. The order is in effect as of Thursday, Oct. 1.

• Texas: Gov. Greg Abbott (R) issued an order, effective Oct. 14, that permits most businesses to operate at 75 percent capacity as long as the business is in an area with a low number of COVID-19 hospitalized patients. Businesses in areas with high hospitalizations must limit occupancy to 50 percent capacity. Religious services, local government operations and recreational sports programs are among organizations with no occupancy limits. Personal care establishments, such as barbershops and nail salons, also don’t have limits on number of customers; however, there must be a 6-foot distance between work stations, among other precautions. Abbott’s order also reopens bars — with the additional approval of each county’s judge — but limits indoor service to 50 percent capacity. Anyone 10 or older must wear a mask in indoor public spaces or when outside if a 6-foot distance from others cannot be maintained. Counties with no more than 20 active COVID-19 cases are exempt. Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited in most circumstances unless local government officials approve them.

Due to a surge in cases, El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego imposed a curfew on residents between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. for social activities. The order lasts until Nov. 30.

• Utah: Gov. Gary Herbert (R) and the health department issued a new order on coronavirus-related restrictions, effective Nov. 24. Individuals over age 2 must wear a mask and socially distance from non-household members when in an indoor public setting. People over age 2 must also wear a mask when outdoors if within 6 feet of a person from another household. Masks aren’t required when an individual is actively eating or drinking, exercising outdoors or exercising indoors if not within 6 feet of a non-household member, among other exceptions. A previous order on gathering limits has expired and wasn’t renewed. Herbert encouraged people to keep holiday gatherings small, outdoors and with only those in the same household, but stopped short of requiring it. Restaurants may not serve alcohol after 10 p.m. All businesses can reopen if they take precautions.

• Vermont: Gov. Phil Scott (R) announced tighter coronavirus-related restrictions. Social gatherings between multiple households are prohibited (immediate family members who reside in different households can still get together). Bars are closed. Restaurants can continue to operate at 50 percent capacity but can now only seat one household per table and must close in-person dining by 10 p.m. (takeout and delivery is allowed). Scott put recreational sports on pause and announced that businesses must reinstate teleworking policies as much as possible. Previously, Scott ordered people 2 and older to wear a face covering in public spaces, indoors or outdoors, when physical distancing isn’t possible. Hair salons and barber shops can reopen, but they must take appointments and limit occupancy. Hotels, inns, bed-and-breakfasts and other lodging areas were allowed to resume operations May 22, but all nonessential travelers must follow a self-quarantine mandate. Alternatively, nonessential travelers can quarantine for 7 days followed by a negative COVID-19 test.

• Virginia: Gov. Ralph Northam (D) announced tighter restrictions to curb the countrywide surge in COVID-19 cases. Virginia is in phase three of its reopening plan. Under the new restrictions, indoor and outdoor gatherings, whether public or private, must be capped at 25 people (down from 250). Restaurants can continue to offer indoor service at full capacity but must now stop serving alcohol by 10 p.m. and close by midnight. A mask mandate remains in place that requires everyone 10 and older to wear a face covering in indoor public spaces. Indoor and outdoor swimming pools, gyms and fitness centers can operate at 75 percent capacity. Movie theaters, concert venues and other entertainment areas can reopen but must follow strict guidelines. Previously, Northam expanded a rent and mortgage relief program. Landlords can now apply for past-due payments dating back to April 1, 2020.

• Washington: Gov. Jay Inslee (D) signed an order that reinstates tighter restrictions on gatherings and some businesses. He prohibited indoor gatherings with people outside the household unless people quarantine for 14 days beforehand or quarantine for 7 days followed by a negative COVID-19 test result 48 hours before the gathering. Outdoor gatherings cannot exceed five people outside the household. Residents at long-term care facilities can receive outdoor visitors, but indoor visits are only allowed in limited circumstances, such as end-of-life care. Effective Nov. 18, restaurants and bars must shutter indoor service. Outdoor dining is permitted, but no more than five people can be seated at a table. Grocery stores, retail stores and personal care businesses, such as hair salons, are among places that must restrict occupancy to 25 percent. Places of worship must limit occupancy to 25 percent or 200 people (whichever is smaller). Gyms, fitness centers, movie theaters and other entertainment venues must close indoor services. The new restrictions last until Dec. 14. Previously, Inslee required masks in indoor public spaces or outdoors when social distancing can’t be maintained. 

• West Virginia: Gov. Jim Justice (R) announced he is revising a statewide mask mandate. Effective Nov. 14, individuals age 9 and older must wear a face covering in all indoor public spaces whether or not social distancing can be maintained. The mandate doesn’t apply when alone in a room, or when eating or drinking in a restaurant. Justice also postponed winter sports and announced that schools will be shuttered for seven days after Thanksgiving.

Previously, Justice rescinded an order prohibiting the general public from visiting nursing homes. New guidelines for visiting rules depend on the number of active COVID-19 cases in the community. The state is using a color-coded map to determine certain restrictions. Social gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted in green and yellow counties. Gold, orange and red counties must limit social gatherings to no more than 10 people. Religious services, weddings or events for essential businesses are among gatherings that are exempt. Restaurants can offer indoor service at 50 percent capacity, among other restrictions. Hair salons, gyms, museums and other businesses should follow safety and sanitation protocols.

• Wisconsin: Gov. Tony Evers (D) issued a stay-at-home order recommending — but not requiring — actions Wisconsinites should take to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Individuals should stay at home. Exceptions include leaving the house to go to work, buy groceries or pick up medications. Businesses should encourage remote work and take precautions where telecommuting isn’t possible, such as avoid congregating in conference rooms. For social gatherings, Evers recommended avoiding get-togethers with anyone outside the household. Previously, Evers ordered everyone age 5 and older to wear a face covering when indoors or in an enclosed space (other than his or her private residence) when other people are present. When outdoors, individuals are encouraged, but not required, to wear masks.

In May, the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the state Department of Health Services’ safer-at-home order, issued under Evers’ direction. Private businesses can enforce their own restrictions, such as requiring patrons to follow social distancing practices.

• Wyoming: Under the direction of Gov. Mark Gordon (R), the state health officer loosened some coronavirus-related restrictions. Restaurants, bars and other food establishments can increase the number of people in one party from 6 people to 8 people (larger parties are permitted when individuals are within the same household). Other restrictions on food establishments remain in place, such as a prohibition on buffet services. Indoor gatherings of 50 people in a single, confined space are allowed. If social distancing and other restrictions are in place, indoor events with up to 250 people are permitted. Gatherings at hotels, livestock auctions, grocery stores and faith-based organizations are among those that are exempt. Hair salons and gyms have also reopened, with restrictions.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect new information.

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