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The Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) examined the latest evidence on how music influences brain health. Here is their final report, part of our efforts for Brain Health Awareness in June 2020, and just in time for people be able to use this information to help support their health and well-being during the pandemic. When we gathered at AARP in Washington, DC at the end of February, Dr. Sanjay Gupta moderated the lively meeting of diverse experts debating whether music-related activities could maintain or improve brain function in older adults.  


“We know that music is a powerful stimulator of the brain. It has the potential to be a critical tool to preserve and enhance brain health. For now, let's stop for a moment and listen to the music,” said Jacobo Mintzer, M.D., Executive Director of the Roper Saint Francis Research and Innovation Center and Governance Committee lead for this report.


The GCBH issue experts were able to reach 13 points of consensus around music and healthy aging and 5 for treatment of disease or injuries causing cognitive impairment over the next several months as the report developed. Although more research is needed, the GCBH issue experts have concluded that listening and making music holds significant potential to support brain health as people age. The GCBH has adopted 10 recommendations for individuals to incorporate music into their lives to promote mental well-being, increase social connection, and stimulate thinking skills. These recommendations as well as practical tips are provided in the final report and were approved by the GCBH Governance Committee in June 2020. Liaisons from numerous civic and nonprofit organizations with expertise in music and brain health reviewed drafts and helped refine the report. The result is a cache of helpful information for adults 50+, health care providers, and communities particularly useful now when social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic limits options for social gatherings and other brain healthy activities.

Among the report’s recommendations is to dance, sing or move to music – these activities not only provide physical exercise but can relieve stress and are fun ways to socialize with friends and family, and can be adapted to be done virtually even if you can’t physically be together. Although listening to music that you know and like tends to cause the strongest response in the brain, try listening to new music to engage your brain. Personalized play lists you can put together for yourself or loved ones by using music apps on computers or smart phones are good options, and these apps may suggest other new music you might be interested in. If you notice you are having trouble hearing, don’t delay getting your hearing checked. Also try making music yourself by learning to play a musical instrument, though singing may be the simplest way to get started (if you aren’t already singing in the shower!)  

To complement the GCBH’s report, AARP surveyed 3,185 American adults age 18 and older about their attitudes and engagement in music-related activities and their self-perceptions of brain health. The survey found that adults who engage in music making and listening are more likely to self-report their overall health, brain health, and cognitive function as excellent or very good. While the survey can’t establish cause and effect, the survey shows that music is a very popular leisure activity that is engaging to many people of all ages with promising potential for brain health benefits. Full survey results can be found in the sidebar.

To find out more about how music can boost brain health, read this article by Rachel Nania.

Music on Our Minds: The Rich Potential of Music to Promote Brain Health and Mental Well-Being cover image

Click image to view full PDF

Available in Spanish translation.

Tune Up Your Brain infographic thumbnail

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Infographic

Tips to engage in music for better brain health.

Also available in Spanish, French, Chinese and Arabic translation. 

 

 

2020 AARP Music and Brain Health Survey

Listening to music related to higher mental well-being, lower levels of anxiety and depression. Learn more.

AAIC Conference Poster

GCBH survey poster

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Poster presented at the 2020 Alzheimer's Association International Conference.

Music Issue Specialists

JONATHAN BURDETTE, MD

Wake Forest School of Medicine

KUEI-MIN CHEN, PhD, RN, FAAN

Kaohsiung Medical University (Taiwan)

SUZANNE B. HANSER, Ed. D., MT-BC

Berklee College of Music

JULENE K. JOHNSON, PhD

University of California, San Francisco

MORTEN L. KRINGELBACH, D.Phil    

University of Oxford (United Kingdom) and University of Aarhus (Denmark)

DANIEL J. LEVITIN, PhD    

McGill University (Canada)

PSYCHE LOUI, PhD

Northeastern University

MARY S. MITTELMAN, Dr. P.H    

New York University

FRANK RUSSO, PhD    

Ryerson University (Canada)

GOTTFRIED SCHLAUG, MD, PhD

Baystate Medical Center and University of Massachusetts

MICHAEL H. THAUT, PhD    

University of Toronto (Canada)

MARK J. TRAMO, MD, PhD     

University of California, Los Angeles

        


Suggested Citation: 

Global Council on Brain Health (2020). “Music on Our Minds: The Rich Potential of Music to Promote Brain Health and Mental Well-Being” Available at www.GlobalCouncilOnBrainHealth.org

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26419/pia.00103.001