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Jazz Greats You Must See Live

Celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month by catching one of these acts

  • Douglas Kirkland

    Herbie Hancock

    En español | The particulars of this jazz pioneer’s hotly anticipated studio collaboration with saxophonist and hip-hop producer Terrace Martin (who worked on a lot of Kendrick Lamar’s landmark disc, To Pimp a Butterfly) remain a mystery. Nevertheless, the pianist, keyboardist and composer superstar is embarking on a world tour featuring Martin, bassist James Genus, guitarist Lionel Loueke and drummer Vinnie Colaiuta. It’s a show no true jazz fan should miss. 

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  • Jerris Madison

    Dianne Reeves

    After winning her fifth Grammy for the 2014 disc Beautiful Life, the majestic singer and superb storyteller is set to release a new live album based on her performance at the world-renowned Marciac Jazz Festival in France. 

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  • Jenny Bagert

    Terence Blanchard

    The esteemed trumpeter and composer continues his mesmeric marriage of music, motions and the imaginary with the release of the soundtrack from The Comedian, starring Robert DeNiro — and, more impressively, Champion, an opera about Emile Griffith, a welterweight boxer who dealt with racism and homophobia in the 1960s.

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  • Toshi Sakurai

    Chick Corea

    When this fiery virtuoso plays the piano, he brings indefatigable verve that’s matched with romantic bravado and compositional heft. His latest disc, The Musician, captured his 70th birthday celebration at the famed Blue Note Jazz Club in 2011. Now on an extensive worldwide tour with his trio (with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Brian Blade) and his noteworthy Chick Corea Elektric Band, this award-winning star shows no signs of slowing down. 

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  • Bryan Adams

    Diana Krall

    After her sleek exploration into 1970s pop on her 2015 disc, Wallflower, the übertalented pianist and singer returns to her jazz roots on her new disc, Turn Up the Quiet, which showcases her interpretations of songs from the Great American Songbook.

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  • Anna Webber

    Kevin Eubanks

    After leading The Tonight Show with Jay Leno band from 1995 to 2010, this virtuosic guitarist has superbly rejuvenated his jazz recording career. His third disc since leaving late-night television, East West Time Line features such fellow jazz luminaries as trumpeter Nicholas Payton, bassist Dave Holland and drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts.

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  • Christopher Drukker

    Regina Carter

    If you’re a lover of modern jazz violin, you can’t go wrong with Regina Carter, the pioneering woman who became both the first African American and first nonclassical musician to play Italy’s coveted Niccolò Paganini violin. On her new disc, Ella: Accentuate the Positive, she celebrates the centennial legacy of Ella Fitzgerald, bringing an invigorating modernity that’s steeped firmly in the now.

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  • AARP Offer

    Sign up for the AARP Lifestyle Newsletter to find out about new movies, great games and travel ideas each month. By joining AARP today, you can also save on movie tickets, restaurants, airfare, hotels and more and have even more fun!

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  • Tracy Love

    Terri Lyne Carrington

    Whether she’s playing behind such icons as Wayne Shorter or Herbie Hancock or leading her own scintillating ensembles — such as the trio with pianist Geri Allen and bassist Esperanza Spalding, or her latest combo, Social Science — this incredibly versatile drummer, composer, bandleader and educator continually brings fresh ideas to jazz without forgoing its multifacted legacy.

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  • Jimmy King

    Donny McCaslin

    This exhilarating tenor saxophonist played on David Bowie’s final disc, Blackstar. Later that year, he released his own tribute to the Thin White Duke with the poignant yet captivating Beyond Now, which reaped commercial and critical acclaim in jazz, rock and electronica circles alike. Now he’s one of the hottest jazz tickets in the world.  

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  • Mark Higashino

    Dee Dee Bridgewater

    This spellbinding singer, actress and recent NEA Jazz Master honoree always delivers, thanks to her virtuosic chops, expansive repertoire and electrifying stage presence. On her forthcoming disc, Memphis (out in September), she retools classic soul music from her birthplace. It’s destined to become another Bridgewater classic. 

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  • Bill Douthart

    Hudson

    Power groups are often iffy endeavors because oftentimes mammoth-sized egos and lackluster chemistry kill the vibe. Nevertheless, this formidable foursome — drummer Jack DeJohnette, guitarist John Scofield, bassist Larry Grenadier and keyboardist John Medeski — proved it had a winning rapport at the 2014 Woodstock Jazz Festival. Now, on its forthcoming eponymously titled debut (out June 9), Hudson displays its sparkling ingenuity while covering songs by Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix and Robbie Robertson. 

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  • Philippe Salomon

    Eliane Elias

    On her recent Grammy-award winning disc, Made in Brazil, this talented singer, pianist and arranger recorded in her home country — a first since moving to the United States in 1981. For a victory lap, she returned to Brazil to make her newest and equally rewarding disc, Dance of Time, which in part celebrates the 100th anniversary of the first samba recording.

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  • Mark Higashino

    Dave Holland

    Without question, he’s one of the finest bassist, composers and bandleaders around. This year, he can add being an NEA Jazz Master to his stellar 50-plus years career, which catapulted in the 1960s when he played with such masters as Miles Davis and Stan Getz. Now leading his new ensemble, AZIZA, this stately jazz veteran continues to push conventional envelopes.

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  • Columbia Artists Management

    Chucho Valdés

    For a real treat, check out this five-time Grammy winner in concert: The influential Afro-Cuban jazz pianist and bandleader composes mesmerizing blends of technically precise European classical music with the improvisational fire of American bebop and Afro-Latin rhythms.

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  • Henry Leutwyler

    Wayne Shorter

    The perpetually inquisitive and innovative tenor and soprano saxophonist may well be our greatest living jazz composer. At 84, his performances bristle with a creative, almost combustible energy.

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