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5 Great Seasonal Jobs for Retirees

Working after retirement in the spring, summer, fall or winter can pay bills and keep you busy

Working after retirement doesn't require a commitment to year-round employment. Some retirees, whether they need the income or simply enjoy staying busy, prefer to take on seasonal jobs that last just part of the year.

One of those retirees is Jim Brush, 67, who drives a stretch limo filled with tuxedo-clad prom goers in the spring and decked-out wedding parties in the summer. Pay is typically $18 an hour, and the extra cash is welcomed. Although he and his wife have two grown children, and he receives a pension, they still have a sizable mortgage to pay.

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5 Great Seasonal Jobs for Retirees

Jim Brush, 67, drives a stretch limo during prom and wedding seasons. — Scott Goldsmith/Aurora

Brush, who lives in Pittsburgh, retired five years ago from his position as a Pennsylvania state dog warden, where he had worked for 25 years. In his pre-retirement days, Brush spent plenty of time in the car cruising county roads to inspect kennels and patrolling for stray pets. Knowing his way around comes in handy today. Brush also chauffeurs passengers for non seasonal events, such as airport runs.

Besides driving, Brush fills his year with other seasonal employment. Snow removal is in hot demand in Pittsburgh's blustery winters, and he does landscaping during the spring and fall months. He even tends bar from time to time. "I want to keep busy earning money while I still have the energy and the desire," he says.

While you might not have the experience or stamina to sign on as a ski instructor in Squaw Valley or a white-water rafting guide in Colorado, great seasonal jobs are out there that are right for you. Here are five to consider. Pay ranges, which will vary based on factors such as experience and where you live, are derived from U.S. Department of Labor data.

1. Limo Driver

The nitty-gritty: Routine duties include keeping the car in ship-shape each day. You'll help passengers into the car, hold open doors, provide umbrellas if it's raining. Loading and unloading heavy luggage can call for some strong muscles. Other drawbacks: driving for long periods can take a mental toll, especially in crowded city streets. Then, too, remaining seated for several hours at a time isn't as easy as it sounds.
The hours: For weddings and proms, drivers are busy from April to June and usually book in three- to five-hour increments. Proms are evening and night shifts. Weddings vary from morning to night bookings. Other trips are often booked by the hour.
Median pay range: Pay can range from $7.67 to more than $16.84 per hour. Those figures vary widely depending on experience, where you live, the number of hours worked and customer tips.
Qualifications: Most limo companies provide on-the-job training. A good driving record is vital — no more than two moving violations in the past five years, and no reckless or drunk driving violations. If you're 70 or older, insurance restrictions might be a stumbling block. Patience, punctuality and level-headedness are de rigueur. A basic understanding of auto mechanics can also be useful. Street smarts count.

Are you computer savvy with a knack for numbers? Read on.>>

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