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Here's How You Could Save $2,017 in 2017

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    Spend Less, Save More ($2,017 To Be Exact)

    New Year's resolutions about money, specifically spending less and saving more, are among the most popular January vows, but they're often the hardest to keep. By adopting even a few simple cost-cutting measures, you could save some serious cash during the year. Consider these painless penny-pinching tips that could save you a whopping $2,017 in 2017.

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    De-Junk the trunk ($40 savings)

    Removing unnecessary stuff you're probably carrying around in your car — like spare tools, seasonal items and things you've been meaning to drop off at the thrift store — can help you save on gas. According to the Alliance to Save Energy website, removing 100 pounds of excess weight from your vehicle could save $40 per year in fuel costs.

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    File your own taxes ($119 savings)

    The National Society of Accountants says the average fee for professional preparation of an individual's federal and state tax returns is $159, and that's without itemized deductions. Taxpayers with income under $64,000 can file federal returns online for free through Free File at irs.gov, and H&R Block and TurboTax also offer free online filing for state and certain federal returns. Even if you use an easy online tool for itemized federal and state returns like TaxAct Plus for $40, you'll still save a nice chunk of change.

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    Say no to soft drinks ($657 savings)

    On average, Americans drink an astounding 44 gallons of soda a year. Few soft drinks have any nutritional value, and there's plenty of medical evidence that over-consumption of soft drinks — particularly those filled with sugar — can be very bad for your health. They're also bad for your bank account. Those 44 gallons are probably costing a family of four about $657 a year, according to MoneyAhoy.com, a financial website.

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    Drop a magazine subscription ($20 savings)

    Dropping even a single magazine subscription will save approximately $20, based on the average subscription cost estimates published on adage.com. Save a lot more by reading magazines, newspapers and books borrowed from the public library or available for free online.

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    Order prescriptions in three-month supplies ($64 savings)

    University of Chicago researchers estimate that the out-of-pocket cost for a one-month supply of an average-priced prescription is $20.44, whereas the average monthly out-of-pocket cost when an Rx is dispensed as a three-month supply is $15.10. That means you could save $64.08 in out-of-pocket costs per year, and that's just for a single prescription.

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    Tap into a little extra savings ($14 savings)

    Reducing your consumption of tap water can not only save you a little money but also help to conserve supplies of fresh water, an increasingly threatened natural resource. Studies show that turning off the tap while brushing your teeth alone will save 200 gallons every month. The average cost of water in the U.S. is $1.50 per 264 gallons, so yearly, you'll save around $14.

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    Package your own snacks ($150 savings)

    If you're a junk-food junkie, the best advice is to just kick the chips-and-candy habit. But if you continue to indulge even in moderation, you'll save a surprising amount of money by buying larger bags and splitting them into individual servings, rather than paying for pricey boxes of individually packaged snack foods. Money-saving guru Lauren Greutman says you can save $150 just by repackaging a year's supply of potato chips from economical 16-ounce bags into individual servings.

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    Choose your fonts wisely ($18 savings)

    According to an article published on Lifehacker.com, three printer fonts — Times New Roman, Calibri and Century Gothic — use considerably less printer ink than some others, especially the popular Ariel font. In fact, Consumer Reports found that Times New Roman used about 27 percent less ink than Ariel. Based on the average ink usage at our house, that's a savings of about $18 per year.

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    Brown-bag it an extra day each week ($520 savings)

    If you're a working stiff, you know that you can save a lot of money by carrying a lunch from home, rather than dining out every day. But that takes discipline and isn't as much fun. So here's the challenge for 2017: Brown-bag your lunch just one additional day per week, and, based on data from the website business.time.com, you'll save a hefty $520 this year alone.

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    Check the cost of checks ($15 savings)

    The use of personal checks is quickly becoming a thing of the past. But even if you use only one box of checks a year, the website bankrate.com says you'll save about $15 by purchasing them at a big-box store like Sam's Club or Wal-Mart, instead of ordering them through your bank. Plus, you usually get more checks in the box than when you order them through a bank.

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    Quit betting on a "sure thing" ($400 savings)

    Stop playing the lottery or gambling. The average American loses (net) almost $400 each year gambling. And here's something to think about: Statisticians say that you're significantly more likely to be killed in an auto accident while driving to a store to buy a Powerball or Mega Millions lottery ticket than you are to actually win one of those lotteries — assuming you survive.

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