Concrete Change Website (2012)

Overview

The Concrete Change website acts as resource for planners and local leaders seeking rationale, support, and methodology for implementing visitability principles in home construction and renovation. Visitability incorporates three features that make homes accessible for people of all ages, but especially for older residents or the disabled. These accessibility features include a zero-step entrance, wide passage doors, and at least a half-bathroom on the main floor.  Visitability incorporates universal design and provides an attractive option for residents seeking to age in place.

Key Points

The key info toolbar on the Concrete Change website features useful topics for planners, community leaders, and local officials seeking information on visitability. Basic visitability information, construction concepts, policy strategies, and resources are provided in this toolbar. The Construction section of site examines costs and construction guidelines for creating accessible housing through visitability features. The Policy Strategies section examines state, federal and international policies that have been implemented to improve the visitability of homes. Resources are also provided in this toolbar and offer further information on visitability principles, as well as informative handouts and brochures.

A presentation on visitability concepts, given by Eleanor Smith of Concrete Change for the Montana Disability and Health program, is featured on the site and can be found here: http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/Publications/IntroVisitability.pdf. The presentation discusses cost and construction myths related to visitability principles and provides visual illustrations of home floor plans that incorporate visitability features.

How to Use

The site provides useful information and resources to spark local advocacy among planners, local officials, and community leaders looking to improve new home construction standards and incorporate visitability into their planning efforts. Planners and local officials can use the site to gain an understanding of the important role visitability plays in allowing older adults’ to age in place and remain in their homes and communities for as long as possible.

View website: Concrete Change Website (2012)

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