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Life After Divorce

More boomers are calling it quits after years of marriage

Someone to watch over me

Caregiving adds to the burden of aging alone — and it, too, typically affects women. A 2009 National Alliance for Caregiving/AARP survey found that 66 percent of caregivers were female, with women providing on average 21.9 hours per week vs. 17.4 hours for males. And, according to a National Alliance for Caregiving/Evercare survey, the average out-of-pocket expense for caregivers is $5,531 a year, $8,728 if helping from a distance and $5,885 if the caregiver and care recipient live together.

Older men may make out better financially than women, but they don't fare so well at finding someone to take care of them when they're older. "They often don't have alternative care networks the way women do," says Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University. "If a man gets divorced, his support in later life is gone. Plan B may be to remarry because he needs a caregiver."

After divorce, children often live with their mothers. If dads move away or don't stay close, adult children may not be willing to be caregivers when needed.

Remarriage for either ex is murky territory, too. "If you acquire a stepson when you're 60, will he help you when you're old?" asks Cherlin. "We're creating complex family relationships where we're related to more people but obligated to fewer." Even if there is a close bond, children may not live close by.

When asked who they'll turn to when they're older, single men often cite paid help, says Teresa Cooney, a gerontologist at the University of Missouri. But paid help is pricey, and can be hard to find. Up to half of the 5.4 million adults with Alzheimer's have no identifiable caregiver. Former spouses often step in, mainly to spare their children, or because no one else can, says Cooney.

New configurations

The end of a marriage often leads to the formation of a new family, with relatives or friends assuming the caregiving role of a spouse. It can also lead to some unexpected living arrangements.

After her marriage of 32 years ended in 2008, Ellen Rittberg, 60, of Long Island, N.Y., moved to her mother's home to save money. A year into the arrangement, her mom broke her pelvis; Rittberg decided to stay. Now they care for each other. "It is mutual love and companionship," says the mother of three and grandmother of two. "I went from being embarrassed that I was living with my mother to feeling so lucky we're close, and that I can do this."

Next: Where will I live after a divorce? »

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