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NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: Impact of Diet and Lifestyle Factors on Cancer Incidence: Prostate Cancer

Cancer Sites | Prostate

For a copy of these publications and others related to the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, visit the National Cancer Institute.

History of diabetes mellitus and subsequent prostate cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
A history of diabetes is associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer, and high levels of routine physical activity strengthen this relationship. These were the findings of the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, which collected data on 328,216 men ages 50-71. During 5 years of follow-up, 11,193 prostate cancer cases were ascertained. The inverse relationship between diabetes and cancer was similar for organ-confined and advanced prostate cancer.

Multivitamin Use and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study
Taking multivitamin supplements does not appear to be associated with early or localized prostate cancer; however, larger amounts and higher frequency of multivitamin consumption may be related to an increased risk of advanced and fatal prostate cancer. After studying the multivitamin consumption and nutritional habits of 295,344 men ages 50-71, the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study found that:

  • Regular multivitamin use was unrelated to overall risk of total and organ-confined prostate cancer
  • Those who took multivitamins more than 7 times per week were at an increased risk of advanced and fatal prostate cancer compared with never users

Supplemental and Dietary Vitamin E Intakes and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Large Prospective Study
Supplemental vitamin E does not protect against prostate cancer, but increased consumption of vitamin E from foods is associated with a reduced risk of the disease, according to a study that analyzed data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study for 295,344 men ages 50-71. With over 10,000 incident prostate cancer cases, including 1,476 advanced cases, this is the largest prospective study to date to examine the role of vitamin E in prostate cancer prevention.

Prospective Study of Adiposity and Weight Change in Relation to Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality
Does being obese or even overweight increase a man's risk of developing prostate cancer and dying from it? No to developing the disease, yes to dying once it develops.

Further information about the study or individual reports may be obtained by contacting Nancy Wood of AARP at media@aarp.org or 202-434-2583.

« back to list of NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study reports

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