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A Meditation Technique That Changes the Brain

Science says the ancient practice has benefits beyond reducing stress, lowering blood pressure

Short-term effects

While Grant’s study involved people who had practiced Zen meditation for 1,000 hours or more, Fadel Zeidan, a psychological researcher, wondered whether a briefer meditation experience could have an effect.

“I was curious whether things can happen immediately,” says Zeidan. “We live in this drive-through society. We want things quick and easy.”

For three years, from 2005 to 2008, Zeidan tested the pain sensitivity of some small groups of college undergraduates at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He then gave them simple mindfulness instructions and had them practice for 20 minutes at a time on three consecutive days. He found that the students had a higher tolerance for pain than when they started.

“Pain is undeniable ... and it happens in the moment,” says Zeidan, a mindfulness practitioner. “Mindfulness teaches, ‘You can let it go.’ ”

The college students’ brief training also made them noticeably less anxious, Zeidan says. And they felt less pain even when not meditating. “We found out that meditation has a lasting effect on cognition even with short-term training,” he says.

Fighting depression

In recent years, clinical psychologists have used this insight to develop mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, which has proved effective for helping people deal with anxiety and depression. It has even been shown to prevent a recurrence of depression.

In Albuquerque, Krause underwent her training with Michelle DuVal, who teaches classes at a local health center and at the Univerity of New Mexico. DuVal sees about 600 students a year, most of whom are in their 40s and 50s.

DuVal, whose father was a meditation teacher, had a high-pressure career as an independent filmmaker when she realized about five years ago that her life was out of control.

“I got really stressed and couldn’t handle it anymore,” DuVal recalls. “My dad said, ‘Why don’t you try meditating?’ I tried it and very quickly started realizing the benefit.” Last year, she took over for her father when he retired.

Not a religion

Although mindfulness meditation practices are often associated with Buddhism, DuVal says her teaching is not religious. “What it means to meditate itself isn’t religious,” she explains. “It’s something that you do with your mind, basically.”

Mindfulness meditation seems to have something for everyone, DuVal says. In a recent class, “some people were just stressed out at their jobs,” she says. “Other people are facing life-threatening illnesses. I had a woman with stomach cancer. I had a man who had broken his back in several places and was in chronic pain.”

Learning to adopt a mindful attitude “changes everything,” DuVal says, “because the whole world comes from your mind. We train them in putting their minds into the present, where stress cannot and does not exist.”

Resting the mind

A key point is realizing that whatever we experience, “it’s not outside of us,” DuVal says. “It’s our relationship to things happening in our life that causes the stress. It’s how we look at them. How we think about them.”

Michael Haederle is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in People, the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

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