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9 Ways to Make Friends and Boost Brain Health

Staying socially engaged helps ward off memory loss and dementia

  • Women taking a picture of themselves, Socializing for Brain Health

    Fend Off Dementia — With Friends

    En español l When you're young, making friends seems effortless. But the older you get, the more challenging it can become. And that can spell trouble, because a mountain of studies tells us that staying socially engaged stimulates the brain in areas critical to learning and memory. So how do you refresh your social network? Try these nine ideas. — Radius Images / Alamy

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  • Two couples eating at retro diner, Socialization and brain health (Radius Images/Alamy)

    Go Deep

    You don't have to be a social butterfly to reap the benefits of social engagement. "A few close relationships is just fine," says Laura L. Carstensen, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. "It's not the number, but rather the richness and depth of relationships that counts." — Yellow Dog Productions/Getty Images

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  • Man talking to woman in bookstore, Risk reaching out (Yellow Dog Productions/Getty Images)

    Risk Reaching Out

    Friendships don’t just happen; you have to work at finding and strengthening them. So be brave and ask the person next to you in line at the grocery store if she’s enjoying the magazine she’s leafing through. Or invite people over for a potluck dinner and ask each guest to bring a friend.
    — Radius Images / Alamy

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  • Attend a concert, Socialization and brain health (Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images)

    Just Say Yes

    If someone invites you for tea, lunch or the ballet, go — even if you don't know an arabesque from an assemblé. The more you put yourself out there, the more people you'll meet. It is not a lifetime commitment, just a fun outing. — Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

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  • Couple in open convertible car, Socialization and brain health (Laura Doss/Corbis)

    Get on the Road

    Dozens of tour companies now cater to older adults including Elder Treks and Road Scholar (formerly Elderhostel). Also, many colleges have active alumni associations that sponsor trips. When was the last time you checked in with yours? — Laura Doss/Corbis

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  • People cleaning beach, Socialization and brain health, Volunteerism (Monty Rakusen/cultura/Corbis)


    Any time you reach out to others you boost brain health, too. Programs such as Experience Corps, sponsored in part by AARP, train seniors to tutor inner city kids in 20 cities across the country. (Find them at experiencecorps.org; 202-434-6400.) Encore.org offers a road map to paid as well as volunteer opportunities such as teaching business skills to low-income people or planting community gardens. (Find them at encore.org; 415-430-0141.) — Monty Rakusen/cultura/Corbis

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  • Women at local market, Socialization and brain health, Local participation (Richard Schultz/Corbis)

    Think Local

    Community activities give you a chance to meet a diverse group of people who live nearby. Check newspaper listings and drop by that gallery opening or book reading. If you attend and enjoy chatting with someone, jot down his email or phone number so you can stay in touch. — Richard Schultz/Corbis

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  • Adult students around a computer, Socialization and brain health, Learning (Image Source/Getty Images)

    Pursue Your Passion

    When you do something that sparks your interest — cooking classes, a jewelry-making workshop — chances are you’ll meet someone who shares a similar curiosity. See him or her every week and a new friendship is born.
    — Image Source/Getty Images

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  • Join Facebook, Socialization and brain health (Blend Images/Alamy)

    Join a Social Network

    Social media sites, like Facebook, offer the chance to reconnect with old friends and reinforce ties to new ones. Terrified of technology? Check out SeniorNet, which offers workshops on computer use and Internet safety. Also meetup.com links like-minded people on just about every interest you may have.
    — Blend Images/Alamy

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  • Aerial view Miami Beach area, Socialization and brain health, Relocation (Hoberman Collection/UIG/Getty Images)

    Consider a Move

    Many of us want to grow old in the same place we've always lived. But for some, a move to another community — perhaps one with shops and restaurants, within easy walking distance or a college town — is an invigorating option. — Hoberman Collection/UIG/Getty Images

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