Alert
Close

Watch the NASCAR race on Sunday at the Atlanta Motor Speedway. Join the Drive to End Hunger!

Stevie Nicks Is Still On Hyperdrive

An interview with the hard-working Fleetwood Mac frontwoman

Stevie Nicks sings during a concert.

Singer Stevie Nicks in a recent performance at the Farm Bureau Live Pavilion in Virginia Beach, Va. — Tina Fultz/Zumapress

Stevie Nicks — lead singer and cowriter of Fleetwood Mac — is on a multimedia tear. After a sold-out world tour this year she's just released the DVD In Your Dreams (a visual bookend to her acclaimed 2011 solo album of the same name), and she's drawing new fans through her guest appearance on the hit show American Horror Story, which airs early next year. She slowed down long enough to answer our questions about the seemingly timeless appeal of her music.

Q: You're a very private person, but In Your Dreams was filmed in your home.

A: I had two good reasons for allowing that. First, Dave [Stewart, of the Eurythmics] said to me, "I think this album is going to be really magic. We should film it."

"Are you kidding?" I asked him. "That means I'll have to wear makeup and get dressed every day."

Dave said, "Yeah, you may have to wear a little makeup, but I know how to shoot women — I've been doing it since Annie Lennox. And I use cameras that film in soft light, so we won't have to change the ambiance [of your home]. And if you don't like it, no one will ever see it."

Second, I started thinking about the Tom Petty documentary Runnin' Down a Dream, where you get to see the Traveling Wilburys — and then, in the blink of an eye, two of them [Roy Orbison and George Harrison] are gone. So I thought, "We don't live forever — let's do this!"

Q: Fleetwood Mac had to cancel the Australia and New Zealand legs of the tour so bass player John McVie could undergo cancer treatment.

A: Yes, but he's doing well. He's going to have a little operation in January, but he'll come through with flying colors. There's nothing wimpy about John.

Q: We're at that age where issues of vulnerability crop up.

A: Well, I lost my godson to an overdose of Xanax and alcohol at a frat party two years ago, three weeks before my mom died. And I see a lot of young people heading down a bad road, so I'm much more worried about their mortality rate than mine. It makes me realize life is precious, and that I need to keep in contact with all my friends.

The Takeaway: Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Welch commits suicide

Q: You're doing a longer concert set than you ever have. How do you stay healthy?

A: I do Weight Watchers and take a lot of vitamins, but I don't really work out — unless you count dancing around the house and the hotel room. We're always doing shows — those are my workout. If I have a day off, I stay in bed: I make myself a hot-water bottle and some tea, and I don't move.

Next page: Fleetwood Mac's enduring appeal. »

Topic Alerts

You can get weekly email alerts on the topics below. Just click “Follow.”

Manage Alerts

Processing

Please wait...

progress bar, please wait
 

Tell Us WhatYou Think

Please leave your comment below.

Discounts & Benefits

From companies that meet the high standards of service and quality set by AARP.

Cirque Du Soleil

Members save up to 20% on live Cirque du Soleil shows with their AARP membership card.

Regal Cinemas movie theater

Members pay $8 for Regal ePremiere tickets purchased online. Conditions apply.

Movies Unlimited

Members save 10% on purchases of DVDs & Blu-ray discs from Movies Unlimited.

Member Benefits

Join or renew today! Members receive exclusive member benefits & affect social change.