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Join Jeff Gordon, AARP, and AARP Foundation in solving the problem of senior hunger in America.

 

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Poverty and Aging

AARP Foundation Resources on Hunger and Food Insecurity

Get involved. AARP Foundation Can Help.

 

Locate Food Assistance Programs at Benefits QuickLINK.

You'll find  helpful state, federal, and private benefits programs available where you live.  By answering a few questions, you will get fact sheets, applications, and websites for programs that can help you save money and cover costs of everyday expenses.  It’s fast, private, and secure.

To help locate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) resources in your state and community, Benefits QuickLINK has a SNAP Map that lists all the SNAP/Food Assistance programs, including those programs available in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

You can find out if you or someone you care about is eligible, locate a program near you, download an application or complete one on-line.  Benefits QuickLINK also includes applications in Spanish and other languages.

Reach Out to Your Community with the SNAP “Create the Good” Tool Kit
AARP’s Create the Good is where good people get connected to opportunities to create good in whatever way works for them – by finding service opportunities in their communities that fit their lives and connect them to other like-minded people in their communities.  Download the SNAP Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Create the Good Tool Kit to help a neighbor, family member or fellow parishioner get nutrition assistance benefits.

Learn More about Hunger and Food Insecurity among Older Americans
Five million Americans age 60 and older – over 11% of all older Americans – have experienced some type of food insecurity, struggling to afford enough healthy food to meet their basic needs. Of these, about 2.5 million were at-risk of hunger and about 750,000 suffered from hunger due to financial constraints.  Learn more about this growing problem with these AARP resources:

  • AARP Nutrition Assistance Programs Fact Sheet: Nutrition assistance programs play a vital role in promoting the well-being and independence of older Americans.  Learn more about the various nutrition assistance programs available to older adults in this fact sheet by the AARP Public Policy Institute as well as information about the funding sources that support these programs.

  • Going Hungry in America: In this riveting five-part series in AARP Bulletin Today, journalist Peter Jaret explores the complexities and the politics of hunger among older Americans:

 

  1. How Could It Happen Here?: With food and energy prices soaring, millions of older Americans are going hungry—and, increasingly, going it alone as their safety net frays.  AARP Bulletin Today investigates the causes and consequences of hunger in the generations that helped to build the Great Society.
  2. Food Programs Feel the Squeeze: Soaring food and energy prices have left nonprofit emergency food operations—food banks, soup kitchens and the like—struggling to help the growing number of Americans who are turning to them for help.
  3. What Happened to the Food Surplus?: Four years ago, volunteers at the Community Food Bank in Fresno, Calif., filled grocery bags for the city’s neediest residents with such healthy and appetizing foods as rice, peanut butter, chicken, apricots, bread, nuts, spinach, milk, carrots and butter. Now things have changed.
  4. Food Stamps: Poverty's Barometer: As food and fuel prices rise, there’s one sure-fire way experts can chart the consequences of economic hardship: enrollment in the nation’s food stamp program.
  5. ‘What Can We Do?': In Detroit, amateur gardeners plant seeds and tend vegetable gardens in vacant lots and the yards of foreclosed and boarded-up houses—nurturing new hope for some of the city’s poorest residents.